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Jam from Passionfruit Shells

Keep the shells from Black Passionfruit, and when you have sufficient, make a delicately flavoured & scented deep pink jam.

To each half dozen complete shells (or more if they are very small), you will need the juice of half a lemon
and about 900ml. (One & a half Imperial pints) of water. Use rainwater if you have it.
Halve the shells and simmer with the lemon juice & water for about 30 minutes, or until the liquid is deeply coloured.
Strain off the liquid & measure it. (You could also use this delicious syrup on fruit salad, without proceeding further.)
Scrape the pith from the shells with a spoon and cut up, discarding the outer shell. Return to the liquid.
To each 300ml. (half Imperial pint) of liquid add 300gm. (Just over 10 ozs.) warmed sugar, and dissolve over a slow heat.
Bring to the boil and boil briskly until it reaches setting point.
Pour into hot jars, and either seal immediately, or cover loosely with a tea-towel until perfectly cold, and then seal.

Yield: approximately 450gm.or 1lb.from each half dozen shells.
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Scrumptious Jam

This recipe goes back to the turn of the 20th.century, and originally came from Western Australia.

2 lbs. ripe satsuma plums
12 large figs - nice and pink inside if possible
12 large passionfruit
3 lbs. sugar
Cut plums up small (stones & all). Cut figs up too. Put sugar on, and stand overnight.
In the morning stir fruit around for a while, and boil fast until all is mushy.
Remove plum stones. Add passionfruit pulp. Boil all again for just half an hour.
Take from stove, cool, and bottle before it starts to set.

Note from Margaret: This really is scrumptious! But I would be inclined to bottle and seal while hot.
However, this sometimes causes the passionfruit pips to rise to the top, as can also happen with the peel in marmalade.
If you want to be certain to avoid this, I would still bottle while hot, and cover the open jars with a clean tea towel. Later stir each jar well with a very clean fork while jam is still warm. Cover again with the tea towel until the jars and the jam are completely cold. Then seal.

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Jam and preserves should either be sealed very hot, or left to get competely cold. Otherwise condensation forms on the inside of the covers, and eventually drips onto the surface of the jam, causing mould.

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Contact Margaret RainbowWeb

URL - http://www.users.on.net/~arachne/pfruitjam.html