Kolb's Four Dominant Learning Skills  

The accommodator has the opposite learning strengths of the assimilator and is best at CE and AE. Their greatest strength lies in doing things, in carrying out plans and experiments and involving themselves in new experiences. They tend to be more of a risk taker than people with the other three learning styles are. We have labelled this style 'accommodator' because they adapt themselves to specific immediate circumstances. In situations where the theory or plans do not fit the facts, they will most likely discard the plan or theory. The opposite style type, the assimilator, would be more likely' to disregard or reexamine the facts! The accommodator is at ease with people, but is sometimes seen as impatient and 'pushy'. The accommodator's educational background is often in technical or practical fields such as business. 

The converger's dominant learning abilities are AC and AE. His/her greatest strength lies in the practical application of ideas. We have called this learning style the converger because a person with this style seems to succeed in situations such as conventional intelligence tests, where there is a single correct answer or solution to a question or problem. The converger's knowledge is organised in such a way, through hypothetical-deductive reasoning; he/she can focus it on specific problems. Hudson's research on this style of learning shows that converger's are relatively unemotional, preferring to deal with things rather than people. They tend to have narrow technical interests and choose to specialize in the physical sciences. 

The diverger has the opposite learning strengths of the converger and is best at CE and RO. His/her greatest strength lies in imaginative ability. The diverger excels in the ability to view concrete situation from many perspectives. We have labelled this style diverger because a person with this style performs better in situations that call for generation of ideas such as a brainstorming' session. Hudson's work on this learning style shows that divergers are interested in people and tend to be imaginative and emotional. They have broad cultural interests and tend to specialise in the arts. 

The assimilator's dominant learning abilities are AC and RO. Their greatest strength lies in their ability to create theoretical models. They excel in inductive reasoning - in assimilating disparate observations into an integrated explanation. Like the converger, the assimilator is less interested in people and more concerned with abstract concepts. For him/he: it is more important that the theory be logically sound and precise. Basic sciences rather than applied sciences are favoured.