David Ian Grove

 

David Grove, 2020

 

Text Box:

If the coronavirus pandemic has sparked your interest in the history of infectious diseases and the people and stories around finding their causative organisms, then Tapeworms, Lice and Prions or Pioneers in Infectious Diseases may be just the book for you.

 

Pioneers in infectious diseases: from Hippocrates to the coronavirus

Independently published at www.amazon.com 2020

- paperback: 373 pages with multiple portraits ISBN-13: 979-8670742948

- ebook (kindle)

 

Medicine in the Bible: a 21st century perspective

Independently published at www.amazon.com 2020

- paperback: 256 pages with 23 illustrations ISBN 9798620406630

- ebook (kindle)

 

Tapeworms, lice and prions: a compendium of unpleasant infections

Oxford University Press, 602 pages including 228 illustrations,

Oxford and New York,.

- hardcover ISBN 2014 978-0-19-964102-4

- ebook

 

A History of Human Helminthology

CABI International, 848 pages plus 10 plates (90 portraits), Wallingford 1990.

- hardcover (1990) ISBN 0-85198-689-7

- ebook (2015) Kindle ebook now available from www.amazon.com

 

Strongyloidiasis: a major roundworm infection of man

Taylor and Francis, 336 pages including 112 illustrations, London, 1989

- hardcover ISBN 0-85066-732-1

 

Email address: to reduce spam, the address needs to be generated from the following:
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Now retired: formerly

Director of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital

Clinical Professor of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. The University of Adelaide

 

Qualifications

·       Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery (University of Adelaide, 1966)

·       Diploma of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (University of Sydney, 1968)

·       Member/Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians (1971/75)

·       Doctor of Medicine (University of Adelaide, 1975)

·       Fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia (1987)

·       Doctor of Science (University of Western Australia, 2003)

 

Professional career

1967. Resident Medical Officer, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia

1968a. School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales

1968b. Medical Officer, Repatriation General Hospital, Daw Park, South Australia

1969-70. Medical Registrar, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia

1971. Senior Medical Registrar, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia

1972-74. National Health and Medical Research Council Postgraduate Medical Research Scholar, Department of Medicine, University of Adelaide, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Woodville, South Australia

1974-77. Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Geographic Medicine, Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, United States of America

1977. Attending Physician, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio, United States of America

1978-81. Senior Lecturer in Medicine, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia

Physician, Repatriation General Hospital, Hollywood, Western Australia

1982-88. Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia

Physician, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia

1988-89. Director, Department of Postgraduate Medical Education, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia

Physician, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western  Australia

1989-2007. Director, Department of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Woodville, South Australia

1990-2007. Clinical Professor of Microbiology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia

1991-2007. Clinical Professor of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia

 

Research

 

Conducted in Australia, Papua New Guinea, United States of America, Philippines, United Kingdom

 

Publications

 

Theses titles:

    ·  M.D.    Immunological function in atopy and other disorders

    ·  D.Sc.    Studies in helminthology      

   

Over 190 articles in refereed journals or chapters in text books.

   

Books: see above


Publications

 

PDF files of those publications freely available on PubMed may also be downloaded from this site by clicking on the publication number to the left of the publication of interest.

Reprint requests in the form of pdf files for the remaining publications may be requested from me by emailing me at david.grove@internode.on.net

 

1.      Grove, D.I., O'Callaghan, S.J., Burston, T.O. and Forbes, I.J. Immuno­logical function in dystrophia myotonica.  British Medical Journal iii: 81‑83, 1973. 

2.      Grove, D.I., Burston, T.O. and Forbes, I.J.  Fall in IgE levels after treatment for hookworm.  Clinical and Experimental Immunology 18: 565‑569, 1974. 

3.      Grove, D.I., Burston, T.O. and Forbes, I.J.  Immunoglobulin E and eosinophil levels in atopic and non‑atopic populations infested with hookworm.  Clinical Allergy 4: 295‑300, 1974. 

4.      Grove, D.I. and Forbes, I.J.  Increased resistance to helminth infestation in an atopic population.  Medical Journal of Australia i: 336‑338, 1975. 

5.      Grove, D.I., Burston, T.O., Wellby, M.L., Munro Ford, R. and Forbes, I.J. Humoral and cellular immunity in asthma.  Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology 55: 152‑163, 1975. 

6.      Grove, D.I., Reid, J.G. and Forbes, I.J.  Humoral and cellular immunity in atopic eczema.  British Journal of Dermatology 92: 611‑618, 1975. 

7.      Grove, D.I., Burston, T.O. and Forbes, I.J.  Serum IgE levels in paraproteinaemia.  International Archives of Allergy and Applied Immunology 49: 564‑567, 1975. 

8.      Grove, D.I., McGregor, A. and Forbes, I.J.  Impairment of humoral immunity in Papua New Guinea highlanders.  Papua New Guinea Medical Journal 18: 1‑7, 1975. 

9.      Grove, D.I., Warren, K.S. and Mahmoud, A.A.F.  Algorithms in the diagnosis and management of exotic diseases. III. Strongyloidiasis. Journal of Infectious Diseases 131: 755‑758, 1975. 

10.    Grove, D.I., Warren, K.S. and Mahmoud, A.A.F.  Algorithms in the diagnosis and management of exotic diseases. VI. The filariases. Journal of Infectious Diseases 132: 340‑352, 1975. 

11.    Grove, D.I., Warren, K.S. and Mahmoud, A.A.F.  Algorithms in the diagnosis and management of exotic diseases. VII. Trichinosis.  Journal of Infectious Diseases 132: 483‑488, 1975. 

12.    Grove, D.I. and Warren, K.S.  Relation of intensity of infection to disease in hamsters with acute schistosomiasis mansoni.  American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 25: 608‑612, 1976. 

13.    Grove, D.I., Warren, K.S. and Mahmoud, A.A.F.  Algorithms in the diagnosis and management of exotic diseases. X. Echinococcosis. Journal of Infectious Diseases 133: 354‑358, 1976. 

14.    Grove, D.I. and Warren, K.S.  Effects on murine trichinosis of niridazole, a suppressant of cellular but not humoral immunological responses.  Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology 70: 449‑453, 1976. 

15.    Grove, D.I., Warren, K.S. and Mahmoud, A.A.F.  Algorithms in the diagnosis and management of exotic diseases. XV. Leprosy.  Journal of Infectious Diseases 134: 205‑210, 1976. 

16.    Roberts‑Thomson, I.C., Grove, D.I., Stevens, D.P. and Warren, K.S. Suppression of giardiasis during the intestinal phase of trichinosis in the mouse.  Gut 17: 953‑958, 1976. 

17.    Grove, D.I., Mahmoud, A.A.F. and Warren, K.S.  Suppression of cell‑mediated immunity by metronidazole.  International Archives of Allergy and Applied Immunology 54: 422‑427, 1977. 

18.    Moore, D.L., Grove, D.I. and Warren, K.S.  The Schistosoma mansoni egg granuloma: quantitation of cell populations.  Journal of Pathology 121: 41‑40, 1977. 

19.    Grove, D.I., Cabrera, B.D., Valeza, F.S., Guinto, R.S., Ash, L.R. and Warren, K.S.  Sensitivity and specificity of skin reactivity to Brugia malayi and Dirofilaria immitis antigens in bancroftian and malayan filariasis in the Philippines.  American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 26: 220‑229, 1977. 

20.    Grove, D.I., Mahmoud, A.A.F. and Warren, K.S.  Eosinophils and resistance to Trichinella spiralis.  Journal of Experimental Medicine 145: 755‑759, 1977. 

21.    Grove, D.I., Hamburger, J. and Warren, K.S.  Kinetics of immunological responses, resistance to reinfection and pathological reactions to infection with Trichinella spiralis.  Journal of Infectious Diseases 136: 562‑570, 1977. 

22.    Warren, K.S., Grove, D.I. and Pelley, R.P.  The Schistosoma japonicum egg granuloma. II. Cellular composition, granuloma size and immunologic concomitants.  American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 27: 271‑275, 1978. 

23.    Grove, D.I.  Immunity in filariasis: a review.  Papua New Guinea Medical Journal 21: 32‑42, 1978. 

24.    Grove, D.I. and Civil, R.H. Trichinella spiralis: effects on the host‑parasite relationship in mice of BCG (attenuated Mycobacterium bovis.  Experimental Parasitology 44: 181‑189, 1978. 

25.    Grove, D.I. Leprosy, pp. 21‑26; Echinococcosis, pp. 78‑81; Filariases, pp. 85‑95; Strongyloidiasis, pp. 112‑115 and Trichinosis, pp. 121‑124.  In Geographic Medicine for the Practitioner, K.S. Warren and A.A.F. Mahmoud (Editors), University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1978. 

26.    Grove, D.I. and Davis, R.S.  Serological diagnosis of bancroftian and malayan filariasis.  American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 27: 508‑513, 1978. 

27.    Kazura, J.W. and Grove, D.I.  Stage‑specific antibody‑dependent eosinophil‑mediated destruction of Trichinella spiralis.  Nature 274: 588‑589, 1978. 

28.    Grove, D.I., Valeza, F.S. and Cabrera, B.D.  Bancroftian filariasis in a Philippine village: clinical, parasitological, immunological and social aspects.  Bulletin of the World Health Organisation 56: 975‑984, 1978. 

29.    Valeza, F.S. and Grove, D.I.  Bancroftian filariasis in a Philippine village: entomological findings.  Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health 10: 51‑61, 1979. 

30.    Grove, D.I. and Forbes, I.J.  Immunosuppression in bancroftian filariasis.  Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 73: 23‑26, 1979 

31.    Copeland, D. and Grove, D.I.  Effect of Toxoplasma gondii (Gleadle strain) on the host‑parasite relationship in trichinosis.  International Journal for Parasitology 9: 205‑211, 1979. 

32.    Grove, D.I.  Tissue nematodes (trichinosis, filariasis). In Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases, G.L. Mandell, R.G. Douglas Jr. and J.E. Bennett (Editors), John Wiley and Sons, New York, pp. 2165‑2173, 1979. 

33.    Grove, D.I., Davis, R.S. and Warren, K.S. Brugia malayi microfilaraemia in the mouse: a model for the study of the host responses to microfilariae.  Parasitology 79: 303‑316, 1979. 

34.    Grove, D.I.  Principles in the management of parasitic infections.  Medical Journal of Australia ii: 641‑642, 1979. 

35.    Grove, D.I. Leprosy. In Antimicrobial Therapy, B.M. Kagan (Editor), Third Edition, W.B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia, pp. 335‑339, 1980. 

36.    Dawkins, H.J.S., Grove, D.I., Dunsmore, J.D. and Mitchell, G.F. Strongyloides ratti: susceptibility to infection and resistance to reinfection in inbred strains of mice as assessed by excretion of larvae.  International Journal for Parasitology 10: 125‑129, 1980. 

37.    Grove, D.I.  Strongyloidiasis in Allied ex‑prisoners of war in Southeast Asia.  British Medical Journal 280: 598‑601, 1980. 

38.    Grove, D.I.  A very unusual worm.  Unsigned editorial.  Medical Journal of Australia ii: 2‑3, 1980. 

39.    Grove, D.I. Schistosomes, snails and man. In, Changing Disease Patterns and Human Behaviour, N.F. Stanley and R.A. Joske (Editors), Academic Press, London, pp. 187‑204, 1980. 

40.   Grove, D.I.  Q fever.  Australian Family Physician 9: 680‑682, 1980. 

41.    Grove, D.I.  Skin tests in the immunodiagnosis of filariasis.  World Health Organisation mimeographed documents.  WHO/Fil 80:157 pp. 1‑5, 1980. 

42.    Zaman, V., Dawkins, H.J.S. and Grove, D.I.  Scanning electron microscopy of the penetration of newborn mouse skin by Strongyloides  ratti and Ancylostoma caninum larvae.  Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health 11: 212‑219, 1980. 

43.    Dawkins, H.J.S. and Grove, D.I.  Kinetics of primary and secondary infections with Strongyloides ratti in mice.  International Journal for Parasitology 11: 89‑96, 1981. 

44.    Dawkins, H.J.S., Muir, G.M. and Grove, D.I.  Histopathological appearances in primary and secondary infections with Strongyloides ratti in mice.  International Journal for Parasitology 11: 97‑103, 1981. 

45.    Grove, D.I.  Serum microfilarial antibody titres before and after treatment of bancroftian microfilaraemia with diethylcarbamazine.  Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health 12: 487‑491, 1981. 

46.    Grove, D.I.  Regulation of the prevalence and severity of filariasis: immunity of ecology?  Annals of the Academy of Medicine of Singapore 10: 120‑131, 1981. 

47.    Dawkins, H.J.S. and Grove, D.I.  Transfer by serum and cells of resistance to infection with Strongyloides ratti in mice.  Immunology 43: 317‑322, 1981. 

48.    Grove, D.I. and Blair, A.J.  Diagnosis of human strongyloidiasis by immunofluorescence using Strongyloides ratti and S. stercoralis larvae.  American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 30: 344‑349, 1981. 

49.    Carroll, S.M., Karthigasu, K.T. and Grove, D.I.  Serodiagnosis of human strongyloidiasis by an enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay.  Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 75: 706‑709, 1981. 

50.    Grove, D.I. and Dawkins, H.J.S.  Effects of prednisolone on murine strongyloidiasis.  Parasitology 83: 401‑409, 1981. 

51.    Grove, D.I.  Diseases of overseas travel: recognition and treatment.  Current Therapeutics 22 (11): 51‑56, 1981. 

52.    Dawkins, H.J.S. and Grove, D.I.  Attempts to establish infections with Strongyloides stercoralis in mice and other laboratory animals.  Journal of Helminthology 56: 23‑26, 1982. 

53.    Dawkins, H.J.S., Thomason, H.J. and Grove, D.I.  The occurrence of Strongyloides ratti in the tissues of mice after percutaneous infection.  Journal of Helminthology 56: 45‑51, 1982. 

54.    Dawkins, H.J.S. and Grove, D.I.  Immunisation of mice against Strongyloides ratti. Zeitschrift für Parasitenkunde: Parasitology Research 66: 327‑333, 1982. 

55.    Dawkins, H.J.S., Mitchell, G.F. and Grove, D.I. Strongyloides ratti infections in congenitally hypothymic (nude) mice.  Australian Journal of Experimental Biology and Medical Science 60: 181‑186, 1982. 

56.    Grove, D.I.  Treatment of human strongyloidiasis with thiabendazole: an analysis of toxicity and effectiveness. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 76: 114‑118, 1982. 

57.    Grove, D.I.  What is the relationship between asthma and worms?  Allergy 37: 139‑148, 1982. 

58.    Grove, D.I. Strongyloides ratti and S. stercoralis: the effects of thiabendazole, mebendazole and cambendazole in infected mice.  American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 31: 469‑476, 1982. 

59.    Grove, D.I.  Immunity in human helminth infections. In, Biology and Control of Endoparasites, L.E.A. Symons, A.D. Donald and J.K. Dineen (Editors), Academic Press Australia, Sydney, pp. 375‑400, 1982. 

60.    Grove, D.I.  Filariasis. In, CRC Handbook Series in Zoonoses, Section C: Parasitic Zoonoses, Volume 2, M.G. Schultz (Editor), CRC Press, Boca Raton, Florida, pp. 123‑146, 1982. 

61.    Dawkins, H.J.S., Carroll, S.M. and Grove, D.I.  Humoral and cell‑mediated immune responses in murine strongyloidiasis.  Australian Journal of Experimental Biology and Medical Science 60: 717‑729, 1982. 

62.    Nowotny, R.E. and Grove, D.I.  Description of an examination for objective assessment of history‑taking ability.  Medical Education 16: 259‑263, 1982. 

63.    Crawford, G.P.M., Howse, D.J. and Grove, D.I.  Inhibition of human blood clotting by extracts of Ascaris suum.  Journal of Parasitology 68: 1044‑1047, 1982. 

64.    Grove, D.I.  Strongyloidiasis: is it transmitted from husband to wife?  British Journal of Venereal Diseases 58: 271‑272, 1982. 

65.    Grove, D.I. and Northern, C.  Infection and immunity in dogs infected with a human strain of Strongyloides stercoralis.  Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 76: 833‑838, 1982. 

66.    Dawkins, H.J.S., Robertson, T.A., Papadimitriou, J.M. and Grove, D.I. Light and electron microscopical studies of the location of Strongyloides ratti in the mouse intestine.  Zeitschrift für Parasitenkunde: Parasitology Research 69: 357‑370, 1983. 

67.    Grove, D.I.  Selective primary health care:  Strategies for the control of disease in the developing world.  VII. Filariasis.  Reviews of Infectious Diseases 5: 933‑942, 1983. 

68.    Grove, D.I.  Effects of 22,23 dihydroavermectin B1 on Strongyloides ratti and S. stercoralis infections in mice.  Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology 77: 405‑410, 1983. Note: this agent is now called ivermectin 

69.    Carroll, S.M., Grove, D.I., Dawkins, H.J.S., Mitchell, G.F. and Whitten, L.K.  Infections with a Malaysian dog strain of Ancylostoma ceylanicum in outbred, inbred and immunocompromised mice.  Parasitology 87: 229‑238, 1983. 

70.    Grove D.I., Heenan, P.J. and Northern, C.  Persistent and disseminated infections with Strongyloides stercoralis in immunosuppressed dogs.  International Journal for Parasitology 13: 483‑490, 1983. 

71.    Grove, D.I.  Amoebic dysentery, intestinal protozoa and helminths. In, Microbes and Infections of the Gut, C.S. Goodwin (Editor), Blackwell Scientific Publications, Oxford, pp. 209‑240, 1984.

72.         Howse, D.J., Potter, J.M. and Grove, D.I.  Purification of an anticoagulant from the body fluid of Ascaris suum.  Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology 78B: 183‑187, 1984. 

73.    Carroll, S.M., Mayrhofer, G., Dawkins, H.J.S. and Grove, D.I.  Kinetics of intestinal lamina propria mast cells, globule leucocytes, intraepithelial lymphyocytes, goblet cells and eosinophils in murine strongyloidiasis.  International Archives of Allergy and Applied Immunology 74: 311‑317, 1984. 

74.    Carroll, S.M. and Grove, D.I.  Parasitological, hematologic and immunologic responses in acute and chronic infections of dogs with Ancylostoma ceylanicum: a model of human hookworm infection.  Journal of Infectious Diseases 150: 284‑294, 1984. 

75.    Grove, D.I.  Strongyloidiasis. In, Tropical and Geographical Medicine, K.S. Warren and A.A.F Mahmoud (Editors), McGraw‑Hill Book Company, New York, pp. 373‑379, 1984. 

76.    Carroll, S.M., Pryor, J., Kennett, D.W. and Grove, D.I.  Investigations of the haemolytic effects of Ancylostoma ceylanicum: observations on infected dogs in vivo and human and dog blood in vitro.  Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health 15: 129‑134, 1984.

77.    Carroll, S.M., Howse, D.J. and Grove, D.I.  The anticoagulant effects of the hookworm, Ancylostoma ceylanicum: observations of human and dog blood in vitro and infected dogs in vivo. Thrombosis and Haemostasis 51: 222‑227, 1984. 

 78.   Carroll, S.M., Robertson, T.A., Papadimitriou, J.M. and Grove, D.I. Transmission electron microscopical studies of the site of attachment of Ancylostoma ceylanicum to the small bowel mucosa of the dog.  Journal of Helminthology 50: 313‑320, 1984 

79.    Grove, D.I., Northern, C., Warwick, A. and Lovegrove, F.T.  Loss of surface coat by Strongyloides ratti infective larvae during skin penetration: evidence using larvae radiolabelled with 67gallium.  Journal of Parasitology 70: 689‑693, 1984. 

80.    Grove, D.I.  Tissue nematodes (trichinosis, dracunculiasis, filariasis). In, Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases, G.L. Mandell, R.G. Douglas Jr, and J.E. Bennett (Editors), second edition, John Wiley and Sons, New York, pp. 1568‑1573, 1985. 

81.    Carroll, S.M. Robertson, T.A., Papadimitriou, J.M. and Grove, D.I.  Scanning electron microscopy of Ancylostoma ceylanicum and its site of attachment to the small intestinal mucosa of the dog.  Zeitschrift für Parasitenkunde: Parasitology Research 71: 79‑85, 1985. 

82.    Grove, D.I.  Parasitic intestinal infections. In, Diarrhoeal Disease and Malnutrition: A Clinical Update,  M. Gracey (Editor), Churchill Livingstone, London, pp. 84‑101, 1985. 

83.    Carroll, S.M. and Grove, D.I.  Resistance of dogs to reinfection with Ancylostoma ceylanicum following anthelmintic therapy.  Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 79: 519‑523, 1985. 

84.    Grove, D.I., Northern, C. and Dawkins, H.J.S.  Interactions of Strongyloides ratti free‑living and skin‑penetrated infective larvae and parasitic adults with serum and cells in vitro. Australian Journal of Experimental Biology and Medical Science 63: 521‑529, 1985. 

85.    Grove, D.I.  Worms and the traveller.  Travel Medicine International 3: 125‑129, 1985. 

86.    Carroll, S.M. and Grove, D.I.  Ancylostoma ceylanicum: immunization with worm extract and response to challenge infections of dogs.  Experimental Parasitology 60: 263‑269, 1985. 

87.    Carroll, S.M., Grove, D.I. and Heenan, P.J.  Kinetics of cells in the intestinal mucosa of mice following oral infection with Ancylostoma ceylanicum.  International Archives of Allergy and Applied Immunology 79: 26‑32, 1986. 

88.    Grove, D.I. Northern, C. and Heenan, P.J.  Strongyloides stercoralis infections in the muscles of mice: a model for investigating the systemic phase of infection.  Pathology 18: 72‑76, 1986. 

89.    Carroll, S.M. and Grove, D I. Experimental infections of humans with Ancylostoma ceylanicum: clinical, parasitological, haematological and immunological findings.  Tropical and Geographical Medicine 38: 38‑45, 1986. 

90.    Grove, D.I.  The replicating helminth infections of man. Parasitology Today 2: 107‑111, 1986. 

91.    Grove, D.I.  Protozoal infections in the traveller. Travel Medicine International 4: 10‑15, 1986. 

92.    Carroll, S.M. and Grove, D.I. Response of dogs to challenge with Ancylostoma ceylanicum during the tenure of a primary hookworm infection.  Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 80: 406‑411, 1986. 

93.    Grove, D.I. and Northern C. Strongyloides ratti and S. stercoralis: effects of cambendazole, thiabendazole and mebendazole in vitro. Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo 28: 97‑103, 1986. 

94.    Grove, D.I. Filariasis. In, Strategies for Primary Health Care: technologies appropriate for the control of disease in the developing world, J.A. Walsh and K.S. Warren (Editors), University of Chicago Press, Chicago, pp 257‑269, 1986. 

95.    Grove, D.I. Who discovered that intestinal worm infections could be diagnosed by finding eggs in the faeces?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine 79: 670‑673, 1986. 

96.    Karthigasu, K.T., Bowman, R.A. and Grove, D.I. Vertebral osteomyelitis due to Staphylococcus warneri. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 45: 1029‑1030, 1986. 

97.    Pearce, R.L. and Grove, D.I. Tick infestation in soldiers who were bivouacked in the Perth region.  Medical Journal of Australia 146: 238‑240, 1987. 

98.    Grove, D.I. Parasitic intestinal infections. In, Paediatric Gastroenterology, C.M. Anderson, V. Burke and M. Gracey (Editors), Blackwell Scientific Publications, Oxford, pp. 306‑318, 1987. 

99.    Grove, D.I. Methods for the detection of parasites. In, Paediatric Gastroenterology, C.M. Anderson, V. Burke and M. Gracey (Editors), Blackwell Scientific Publications, Oxford, pp. 880‑882, 1987. 

100.  Sampson, I.A. and Grove, D.I.  Strongyloidiasis is endemic in another Australian population group: Indochinese immigrants. Medical Journal of Australia 146: 580‑582, 1987. 

101.  Northern, C. and Grove, D.I. Antigenic analysis of Strongyloides ratti infective larvae and adult worms.  Immunology and Cell Biology 65: 231‑239, 1987. 

102.  Grove. D.I. and Northern, C. Oral transfer of Strongyloides ratti adult worms to mice.  Journal of Parasitology 73: 424‑425, 1987. 

103.  Grove, D.I., Warton, A., Yu, L.L., Northern, C. and Papadimitriou, J.M. Light and electron microscopical studies of the location of Strongyloides stercoralis in the jejunum of the immunosuppressed dog. International Journal for Parasitology 73: 1030‑1034, 1987. 

104.  Grove, D.I., Warton, A., Northern, C. and Papadimitriou, J.M.  Electron microscopical studies of Strongyloides ratti infective larvae: loss of the surface coat during skin penetration. Journal of Parasitology 73: 1030‑1034, 1987. 

105.  Grove, D.I. Parasitic and fungal infections. In, Inflammatory Diseases of Muscle, F.L. Mastaglia (Editor), Blackwell Scientific Publications, Oxford, pp. 164‑184, 1988. 

106.  Grove, D.I. and Northern, C. The effects of thiabendazole, mebendazole and cambendazole in normal and immunosuppressed dogs infected with a human strain of Strongyloides stercoralis.  Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 82: 146‑149, 1988. 

107.  Grove, D.I., Lumsden, J. and Northern, C. Efficacy of albendazole against Strongyloides ratti and S. stercoralis in vitro, in mice, and in normal and immunosuppressed dogs. Journal of Antimicrobial Therapy 21: 75‑84, 1988. 

108.  Northern, C. and Grove, D.I. Western blot analysis of reactivity to larval and adult Strongyloides ratti antigens in mice. Parasite Immunology 10: 681‑692, 1988. 

109.  Grove, D.I. Strongyloidiasis: past, present and in prospect. In, Perspectives in Parasitology, A.B. Sen, J.C. Katiyar and P.Y. Guru (Editors), CBS, Delhi, 2: 231‑272, 1988. 

110.  Grove, D.I. Historical introduction. In, Strongyloidiasis: a Major Roundworm Infection of Man, D.I. Grove (Editor), Taylor & Francis Ltd., London, pp. 1‑9, 1989. 

111.  Grove, D.I. Clinical manifestations. In, Strongyloidiasis: a Major Roundworm Infection of Man, D.I. Grove (Editor), Taylor & Francis Ltd.,  London, pp. 155‑173, 1989. 

112.  Grove, D.I. Diagnosis. In, Strongyloidiasis: a Major Roundworm Infection of Man, D.I. Grove (Editor), Taylor & Francis Ltd., London, pp. 175‑197, 1989. 

113.  Grove, D.I. Treatment. In, Strongyloidiasis: a Major Roundworm Infection of Man, D.I. Grove (Editor), Taylor & Francis Ltd., London, pp. 199‑231, 1989. 

114.  Genta, R.M. and Grove, D.I. Strongyloides stercoralis infections in animals. In Strongyloidiasis: a Major Roundworm Infection of Man, D.I. Grove (Editor), Taylor & Francis Ltd., London, pp. 251‑269, 1989. 

115.  Northern, C., Grove, D.I., Warton, A. and Lovegrove, F.T. Surface labelling of Strongyloides ratti: stage‑specificity and cross‑reactivity with S. stercoralis.  Clinical and Experimental Immunology 75: 487‑492, 1989. 

116.  Grove, D.I. Metazoan infections. In, Natural Immunity, D.S. Nelson (Editor), Academic Press, Sydney, pp. 723‑748, 1989. 

117.  Grove, D.I. Strongyloidiasis. In, Tropical and Geographical Medicine, K. S. Warren and A.A.F. Mahmoud (Editors), second edition, McGraw‑Hill Information Services Company, New York, pp. 393‑399, 1989. 

118.  Grove, D.I. and Northern, C. Dissociation of the protective immune response in the mouse to Strongyloides ratti. Journal of Helminthology 63: 307‑314, 1989. 

119.  Grove, D.I. African tick typhus (Mediterranean spotted fever) in Australian travellers. Australasian Journal of Dermatology. 29: 141‑145, 1989. 

120.  Grove, D.I.  Tissue nematodes (trichinosis, dracunculiasis, filariasis). In, Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases, G.L. Mandell, R.G. Douglas Jr. and J.E. Bennett (Editors), third edition, Churchill Livingstone, New York, pp. 2140‑2145, 1990. 

121.  Grove, D.I. and Mulligan J.B. Consent, compulsion and confidentiality in relation to testing for HIV infection: the views of West Australian doctors. Medical Journal of Australia 152: 174‑178, 1990. 

122.  Grove, D.I. Common parasitic infections in Australasia. Current Therapeutics 31 (2): 55‑63, 1990. 

123.  Northern, C. and Grove, D.I. Strongyloides stercoralis: antigenic analysis of infective larvae and adult worms. International Journal for Parasitology 20: 381‑387, 1990. 

124.  Grove, D.I. Giardiasis. In, MIMS Disease Index, IMS Publishing, Crows Nest, pp. 201‑202, 1991. 

125.  Grove, D.I. Helminthiases. In, MIMS Disease Index, IMS Publishing, Crows Nest, pp. 225‑228, 1991. 

126.  Grove, D.I. Antiparasitics in Australia: what and when? Modern Medicine of Australia (3): 84‑93, 1991. 

127.  Grove, D.I. Diarrhea due to parasites. In, Diarrhea, M. Gracey (Editor), CRC Press, Boca Raton, pp. 93-113, 1991. 

128.  Douglas, R.M., Grove, D.I., Elliott, J., Looke, D.F.M. and Jordan, A.S. Corneal ulceration due to  Nocardia asteroides. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Ophthalmology 19: 317-320, 1991. 

129.  Looke, D.F.M., Mills, D.J., Kass, R.B. and Grove, D.I. The "welcome home" letter and questionnaire as a valuable quality assurance tool for an Australian traveler's medical clinic. In, Travel Medicine 2: Proceedings of the Second Conference on International Travel Medicine, O. Lobel, R. Steffen, P.E. Kozarsky (Editors), International Society for Travel Medicine, Atlanta, pp. 287-289, 1991. 

130.  Putland, R.A., Thomas, S.M., Grove, D.I. and Johnson, A.M. Analysis of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene of Strongyloides stercoralis. International Journal for Parasitology 23: 149-151, 1993. 

131.  Grove, D.I. Worms in Australia. Medical Journal of Australia 159: 464-466, 1993. 

132.  Grove, D.I.  Parasitic intestinal infections. In, Paediatric Gastroenterology and Hepatology, M. Gracey and V. Burke (Editors), third edition, Blackwell Scientific Publications, Boston, pp. 318-331, 1993. 

133.  Burke V., Anderson, C. M., Dodge J.A., Gracey, M., Grove, D.I. and Hadorn, H.B.  Investigations and methodology. In, Paediatric Gastroenterology and Hepatology, M. Gracey and V. Burke (Editors), third edition, Blackwell Scientific Publications, Boston, pp. 1075-1110, 1993.

134.  Oakes, A.R., Badger R. and Grove, D.I. Comparison of direct and standardized testing of infected urine for antimicrobial susceptibilities by disk diffusion. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 32: 40-45, 1994. 

135.  Grove, D.I. Strongyloides stercoralis: a conundrum for gastroenterologists. Gut 35:437-440, 1994. Reprinted In, Gastroenterological problems from the tropics, GC Cook (Editor), BMJ Publishing Group, London, pp 73-83, 1995. 

136.  Grove, D.I. Diagnosis and management of helminth infections in Australia. Modern Medicine of Australia 38 (4): 77-83, 1995. 

137.  Grove, D.I.  Tissue nematodes (trichinosis, dracunculiasis, filariases). In, Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases, G.L. Mandell, J.E. Bennett and R. Dolin (Editors), fourth edition, Churchill Livingstone, New York, pp 2531-2537, 1995. 

138.  Grove, D.I. Nematodes of lesser importance. In, Oxford Textbook of Medicine, D. Weatherall, J.G.G. Ledingham and D.A. Warrell (Editors), third edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp 993-996, 1996. 

139.  Grove, D.I. Giardiasis. In, MIMS Disease Index, second edition, MIMS Australia, Crows Nest, pp 198-199, 1996. 

140.  Grove, D.I. Worm infections. In, MIMS Disease Index, second edition, MIMS Australia, Crows Nest, pp 579-582, 1996 

141.  Heath, C.H., Grove, D.I. and Looke D.F.M. Delay in appropriate therapy of Legionella pneumonia is associated with increased mortality. European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases 15: 286-290, 1996. 

142.  Grove, D.I. Human strongyloidiasis. Advances in Parasitology 38: 251-309, 1996. 

143. Grove, D.I. Strongyloidiasis. Proceedings of the 5th Western Pacific Congress of Chemotherapy and Infectious Diseases, Singapore, Communication Consultants, pp. 258-261, 1996

144.  Grove, D.I. Chemotherapy of the filariases. Current Concepts in Infectious Diseases. 9: 439-443, 1996. 

145.  Grove, D.I. An update on giardiasis in Australia. Modern Medicine of Australia 41 (1): 40-45, 1998. Reprinted as An update on giardiasis. Modern Medicine of South Africa (August): 31-48, 1999. 

146.  Butcher, A. R., Parasuramar, P., Thompson, C. and Grove, D.I. First report of the isolation of an adult worm of the genus Brachylaima (Digenea: Brachylaimidae) from the gastrointestinal tract of a human. International Journal for Parasitology 28: 607-610, 1998. 

147.  Barber, S., Lawson, P.J. and Grove, D.I. Evaluation of bacteriological transport swabs. Pathology 30:179-182, 1998. 

148.  Grove, D.I., Koutsouridis, G. and Cummins, A.G. Comparison of culture, histopathology and urease testing for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori gastritis and susceptibility to amoxycillin, clarithromycin, metronidazole and tetracycline. Pathology 30: 183-187, 1998. 

149.  Grove, D.I., Der-Haroutian V. and Radcliff RM. Aureobacterium masquerading as “Corynebacterium aquaticum” infection: case report and review of the literature. The Journal of Medical Microbiology 48: 965-970, 1999. 

150.  Grove, D.I.  Nematodes of lesser importance. Concise Oxford Textbook of Medicine, J.G,G. Ledingham and D.A. Warrell (editors), Oxford, University Press, Oxford, p. 1788, 2000. 

151.  Grove, D.I. Tissue  nematodes (trichinosis, dracunculiasis, filariases).  In, Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases, G.L. Mandell, J.E. Bennett and R. Dolin (Editors), fifth edition, Churchill Livingstone, New York, pp. 2943-2950, 2000. 

152.  Grove, D.I. Parasitic infections. In, Small Bowel Disorders, R.N. Ratnaike (Editor), Chapman and Hall, London, pp. 341-355, 2000. 

153.  Roy, D. and Grove, D.I. Efficacy of long-term antibiotic suppressive therapy in proven and suspected infected abdominal aortic grafts. Journal of Infection 40: 184-187, 2000. 

154.  Butcher, A.R. and Grove, D.I. Description of the life cycle stages of Brachylaima cribbi n.sp. (Digenea: Brachylaimidae) derived from eggs recovered from human faeces in Australia. Systematic Parasitology 49: 211-221, 2001. 

155.  Grove, D.I., McLeay R.A.B., Byron K.E. and Koutsouridis G. Isolation of Helicobacter pylori after transport from a regional laboratory of gastric biopsy specimens in saline, Portagerm pylori or cultured on chocolate agar. Pathology 33: 362-364, 2001. 

156.  Grove, D.I. Giardiasis. In, E-MIMS, MIMS Disease Index, MIMS CD Reference System,  MIMS Australia, Multimedia Australia Pty Ltd, St. Leonards, pp. 1-3, August, 2001. 

157.  Butcher, A R., Palethorpe, H.M. and Grove, D.I. The susceptibility of  inbred mice to infection with Brachylaima cribbi (Digenea: Brachylaimidae). Parasitology International 51: 109-115, 2002. 

158.  Grove, D.I. Worm infections. In, E-MIMS, MIMS Disease Index, MIMS CD Reference System,  MIMS Australia, Multimedia Australia Pty Ltd, St. Leonards, pp. 1-8, February, 2002. 

159.  Grove, D.I. and Koutsouridis, G. Increasing resistance of Helicobacter pylori to clarithromycin: is the horse bolting? Pathology 34:71-73, 2002. 

160.  Butcher, A.R., Palethorpe, H.M. and Grove, D.I. Effects of age and sex on the susceptibility of  C57Bl/6J mice to infection with Brachylaima cribbi and the course of infection in NOD SCID mice. Parasitology Research 88: 668-674, 2002. 

161.  Butcher, A.R., Brealey, J.K., Grove, D.I.. and Dymock, R.B. Brachylaima cribbi (Digenea: Brachylaimidae): Scanning electron microscopical observations of life-cycle stages. Journal of Helminthology 76: 207-215, 2002. 

162.  Grove, D.I., Lawson, P.J., Burgess, J.S., Moran, J.L., O'Fathartaigh, M.S. and Winslow, W.E. An outbreak of Legionella longbeachae infection in an intensive care unit? Journal of Hospital Infection 12:250-258, 2002. 

163.  Grove, D.I. Enterobius vermicularis (Pinworm). In, Antimicrobial Therapy and Vaccines, volume 1: Microbes, V. Yu,  R. Weber and D Raoult (Editors), Apple Trees Productions LLC, New York. pp. 1519-1521, 2002. 

164.  Grove, D.I. Strongyloides stercoralis (Strongyloidosis). In, Antimicrobial Therapy and Vaccines, volume 1: Microbes, V. Yu, R. Weber and D Raoult (Editors), Apple Trees Productions LLC, New York. pp. 1641-1650, 2002. 

165.  Grove, D.I. Trichostrongylus species. In, Antimicrobial Therapy and Vaccines, V. Yu, ,  R. Weber and D Raoult (Editors), Apple Trees Productions LLC, New York. pp. 1705-1707, 2002. 

166.  Grove, D.I. Nematode infections of lesser importance.  In, Oxford Textbook of Medicine, D.A. Warrell, T.M. Cox, J.D. Firth and E.J. Benz (Editors), fourth edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford, volume 1, pp. 801-805, 2003. 

167.  Grove, D.I. Liver fluke infections.  In, Oxford Textbook of Medicine, D.A. Warrell, T.M. Cox, J.D. Firth and E.J. Benz (Editors), fourth edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford, volume 1, pp. 837-840, 2003. 

168.  Grove, D.I. Intestinal trematode infections.  In, Oxford Textbook of Medicine, D.A. Warrell, T.M. Cox, J.D. Firth and E.J. Benz (Editors), fourth edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford, volume 1, pp. 843-847, 2003 

169.  Butcher, A.R. and Grove, D.I. Field prevalence and laboratory susceptibility of southern Australian land snails to Brachylaima cribbi sporocyst infection. Parasite 10: 119-125, 2003. 

170.  Grove, D.I. Strongyloides stercoralis. In, Textbook-Atlas of intestinal infections in AIDS, D. Dionisio, (Editor), Springer-Verlag Italia, Milano, pp. 367-372, 2003. 

171.  Butcher, A.R., Palethorpe H.M. and Grove, D.I. Response to reinfection with Brachylaima cribbi in immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice. Parasite International 52: 219-228, 2003. 

172.  Grove, D.I. Diagnosis and management of helminth infections. Medicine Today  5 (90): 43-49, 2004. 

173.  Ju, O, Grove, D.I., Jaksic, W.J., Dart, G.W. Visceral leishmaniasis: a trip to the Greek islands is not always idyllic. Medical Journal of Australia 181: 446-447, 2004. 

174.  Grove, D.I. Tissue nematodes including trichinosis, dracunculiasis and the filariases. In, Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases, G.L. Mandell, J.E. Bennett and R. Dolin (Editors), sixth edition, Elsevier Churchill Livingstone, Philadelphia, pp. 3267-3276, 2005. 

175. Collins M.L., Nair S.B., Der-Haroutian V., Close, D., Rees G.D., Grove, D.I., Wormald P.J. Effect of using multiple culture media for the diagnosis of non-invasive fungal sinusitis. American Journal of Rhinology 19: 41-45, 2005.

176.  Butcher A.R. and Grove D.I. Second intermediate host land snails and definitive host animals of Brachylaima cribbi in southern Australia. Parasite. 12: 31-37, 2005.

177. Grove, D.I. Echinostoma and related echinostomatid flukes. In, Antimicrobial Therapy and Vaccines, volume 1: Microbes, V. Yu, R. Weber and D Raoult (Editors), Apple Trees Productions LLC, New York. pp. 1-5, Online edition, 2005.

178.  Grove, D.I. Fasciolopsis buski. In, Antimicrobial Therapy and Vaccines, volume 1: Microbes, V. Yu, R. Weber and D Raoult (Editors), Apple Trees Productions LLC, New York. Online edition, pp. 1-4, 2005.

179. Grove, D.I. Heterophyes, Metagonimus and related heterophyid flukes. In, Antimicrobial Therapy and Vaccines, volume 1: Microbes, V. Yu, R. Weber and D Raoult (Editors), Apple Trees Productions LLC, New York. pp. 1-6, Online edition, 2005.

180.  Grove, D.I. Nanophyetus salmincola. In, Antimicrobial Therapy and Vaccines, volume 1: Microbes, V. Yu, R. Weber and D Raoult (Editors), Apple Trees Productions LLC, New York. Online edition, pp. 1-4, 2005.

181. Robinson S., Der-Haroutian V., Grove, D.I, Rees G, Wormald PJ. The prevalence of pus in radiologically diseased sinuses in patients undergoing surgery for chronic rhinosinusitis. Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery. Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery 133: 181-184,  2005.

182. Butcher, A.R, Grove, D.I. Seasonal variation in rates of sporocyst and metacercarial infection by Brachylaima cribbi in helicid and hygromiid land snails on the Yorke Peninsula, South Australia. Australian Journal of Zoology 53: 375-382, 2005.

183. Grove, D.I. Friedrich Küchenmeister and the last supper: discoveries in the life cycles of tapeworms and cystic worms. Proceedings of the National Parasitology Symposium: Fetschrift for Dr John Walker, CIDM Public Health, Westmead.  pp. 31-43, 2006.

184. Peake, S., Peter, J.V., Chan, L., Wise, R., Butcher, A.R. and Grove, D.I. First report of septicemia caused by an obligately anaerobic Staphylococcus aureus in a human. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 44: 2311-2313, 2006.

185. Li, J.Y., Yong, T.Y., Khoo, E., Russ, G.R., Grove, D.I.. Coates. P.T. and McDonald, S.P. Isolated sphenoid fungal sinusitis in a renal transplant recipient with bilateral abducens nerve palsy. Transplant International. 20: 640-642, 2007.

186. Li, J.Y., Yong, T.Y., Grove, D.I. and Coates, P.T. Successful control of Scedosporium prolificans septic arthritis and probable osteomyelitis without radical surgery in a long-term renal transplant recipient. Transplant Infectious Diseases 10: 63-65, 2008.

187. Li JY, Yong TY, Grove DI, Coates PT. Late-onset and atypical presentation of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in a renal transplant recipient. Clinical Experimental Nephrology 13: 92-9, 2008

188. Li., J.Y., Yong, T.Y., Juresevic, C.A, Russ, G.R., Grove, D.I. and Coates. PT. Successful treatment of pulmonary mucormycosis in a renal transplant recipient with limited pulmonary reserve by combined medical and surgical therapy. Heart, Lung and Circulation 18: 226-228, 2008.

189. Grove, D.I. Gut and tissue nematode infections acquired by ingestion. In, Oxford Textbook of Medicine, D.A. Warrell, T.M. Cox, and J.D. Firth (Editors), fifth edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp. 1168-1179, 2010.

190.  Grove, D.I. Diphyllobothriasis and sparganosis. In, Oxford Textbook of Medicine, D.A. Warrell, T.M. Cox, and J.D. Firth (Editors), fifth edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp. 1199-1201, 2010. 

191.  Grove, D.I. Liver fluke infections. In, Oxford Textbook of Medicine, D.A. Warrell, T.M. Cox, and J.D. Firth (Editors), fifth edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp. 1212-1216, 2010.

192.  Grove, D.I. Intestinal trematode infections. In, Oxford Textbook of Medicine, D.A. Warrell, T.M. Cox, and J.D. Firth (Editors), fifth edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp. 1219-1224, 2010.

193. Black, MD, Warren L, Grove, DI and Butcher AR. Cutaneous larva migrans in infants in the Adelaide Hills. Australasian Journal of Dermatology 51: 281-284, 2010.

194. Grove, D.I. Gut and tissue nematode infections acquired by ingestion. In, Oxford Textbook of Medicine: Infection, D.A. Warrell, T.M. Cox, J.D. Firth and E Török (Editors), Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp. 796-807, 2012.

195.  Grove, D.I. Diphyllobothriasis and sparganosis. In, Oxford Textbook of Medicine: Infection, D.A. Warrell, T.M. Cox, J.D. Firth and E Török (Editors), Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp. 828-830, 2012. 

196.  Grove, D.I. Liver fluke infections. In, Oxford Textbook of Medicine: Infection, D.A. Warrell, T.M. Cox, J.D. Firth and E Török (Editors), Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp. 841-845, 2012.

197.  Grove, D.I. Intestinal trematode infections. In, Oxford Textbook of Medicine: Infection, D.A. Warrell, T.M. Cox, J.D. Firth and E Török (Editors), fifth edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp. 849-854, 2012.


 

Strongyloidiasis: a major roundworm infection of man. D.I. Grove (editor), Taylor and Francis, London, pp. 336, 1989

 

Contents

 

Chapter 1

Historical introduction

1

Chapter 2

Identification of species of Strongyloides – R Speare

11

Chapter 3

Morphology and life history of Strongyloides stercoralis - GA Schad

85

Chapter 4

Pathology – RM Genta and M Caymmi Gomes

105

Chapter 5

Immunology - RM Genta

133

Chapter 6

Clinical manifestations – DI Grove

155

Chapter 7

Diagnosis – DI Grove

175

Chapter 8

Treatment – DI Grove

199

Chapter 9

Epidemiology, prevention and control – ZS Pawlowski

233

Chapter 10

Strongyloides stercoralis infections in animals – RM Genta and DI Grove

251

Chapter 11

Strongyloides fuelleborni and similar parasites in animals and man –

RW Ashford and G Barnish

271

Chapter 12

Strongyloides ratti infections in rodents: value and limitations as a model of human strongyloidiasis – HJS Dawkins

287

Index

 

333

 

 Reviews

 

Bell, D.R.  Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology

 

“This is an excellent up-to-date review of current knowledge on the subject of human strongyloidiasis and those species of animal Strongyloides which can infect man from time to time. The editor is Dr. D.I. Grove, whose work with Strongyloides infection in Australian ex Far East prisoners of war is well known and who has made several important contributions to the subject.”

 

Cook, G.C. Journal of Infection

 

“This excellently produced and authoritative volume … fills an important gap in the review literature devoted to the intestinal helminthiases. It is to be warmly recommended both to physicians and … parasitologists with an interest in human nematode infections.”

 

Denham, D.A. Tropical Diseases Bulletin

 

“There has been a need for a good textbook on the subject of human strongyloidiasis. This book has gone a long way towards being perfect."

 

Jira, J. Journal of Hygiene, Epidemiology, Microbiology and Immunology; Also in Folia Parasitologica, Helminthologia 28: 2-3, 1991 and in the original Czech language journals

 

“This monothematic monograph is a summary of all hitherto known facts, a valuable supplement to textbooks of medical parasitology and tropical medicine and covers all aspects of the problem. The publication is recommended for specialists in infectious and tropical diseases, epidemiologists and especially parasitologists of medical, biological and veterinary orientation.”

 

Nicholas, W.L. International Journal for Parasitology

 

“The editor has organized a well balanced and comprehensive account of an important human disease about which much more needs to be known… The book, which I read with pleasure, has much to interest parasitologists generally and should prove invaluable to clinical medical parasitologists. It is good value for money.”

 

Polderman, A.M. Tropical and Geographical Medicine

 

“This is an important monograph on an often neglected parasite of man… The publisher’s statement that ‘this major roundworm infection of man is comprehensively summarized in this unique volume’ is not exaggerated.”

 

Ramanakira, G. Médecine Tropicale

 

“Didactique, complet, de lecture agréable, ce manuel sera d’une très grande utilité pour le parasitologue, pour les clinicians qui auront à traiter cette affection parasitaire sans oublier l’étudiant qui prépare son diplôme de Médecine Tropicale.”

(Instructive, complete and of a pleasant presentation, this manual will be of very great use to parasitologists, clinicians who treat this parasitological infection and also those who are studying for the diploma in tropical medicine. – translated by DI Grove)

 

Schutte, CHJ. South African Medical Association Journal

 

“This is an attractively produced and beautifully illustrated book of ... superb quality... The book will be most useful to clinicians faced with managing afflicted patients and to parasitologists, particularly those interested in human nematode infections.”

 

Sturrock, R.F. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

 

“Clinicians, researchers, teachers and students alike will find it an invaluable reference book, and not merely for the exhaustive reference list accompanying each chapter.”

 


Availability

 

Unfortunately, this book is now out of print.

It may be possible to scan a chapter if you are desperate.

A major update on strongyloidiasis was published in: Grove, D.I. Human strongyloidiasis. Advances in Parasitology 38: 251-309, 1996

 

A History of Human Helminthology, CABI International, pp. 848 plus 10 plates (90 portraits), Wallingford 1990.

 

Contents

 

Preface

i

Acknowledgements

viii

1

 The nomenclature and classification of worms

1

2.

Understanding the origin and transmission of worms

33

3

The discovery and development of anthelmintics

75

4

Fasciola hepatica and fascioliasis

103

5

Fasciolopsis buski and fasciolopsiasis

127

6

Clonorchis sinensis and clonorchiasis

141

7

Paragonimus westermani and paragonimiasis

159

8

Schistosoma haematobium and schistosomiasis haematobia

187

9

Schistosoma mansoni and schistosomiasis mansoni

233

10

Schistosoma japonicum and schistosomiasis japonica

263

11

Trematode infections of lesser importance

297

12

Echinococcus granulosus and echinococcosis or hydatid disease

319

13

Taenia solium and taeniasis solium and cysticercosis

355

14

Taenia saginata and taeniasis saginata

385

15

Diphyllobothrium latum and diphyllobothriasis

397

15

Cestode infections of lesser importance

421

17

Enterobius vermicularis and enterobiasis

439

18

Trichuris trichiura and trichuriasis

455

18

Ascaris lumbricoides and ascariasis

469

20

Ancylostoma duodenale, Necator americanus and hookworm disease

499

21

Strongyloides stercoralis and strongyloidiasis

533

22

Trichinella spiralis and trichinosis

571

12

Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia species and filariasis

597

24

Loa loa and loiasis

641

25

Onchocerca volvulus and onchocerciasis

661

26

Dracunculus medinensis and Guinea worm disease

693

27

Nematode infections of lesser importance

721

28

Miscellanea

765

29

Biographies

783

Person index

823

Subject index

836

 

Preface to the Kindle edition (2015) – from www.amazon.com for US$6.99

 

Technology has advanced enormously since the publication of the book edition (1990) and the CD version (1996). Transmission of ebooks via the Internet is how so commonplace and Amazon has provided a platform to make them available. The copyright was returned to me by the original publishers, CABInternational, in 1995 so I have now converted the book to kindle format. The opportunity was taken to correct any typographical errors and make minor updates of the text, mostly related to changes in biological or geographical nomenclature that have occurred over the last quarter century, corrections to original Greek words and provision of the given or Christian names of hundreds of the more obscure investigators, courtesy of that marvellous invention, the Internet. In addition, a few extra biographical notes and photographs or portraits have been included as have several “2015 updates” to the text. I hope you find this work both enjoyable and informative. If you cite from this work in a scientific publication, please do so in a manner similar to either:

 

Grove DI, A History of Human Helminthology, CAB International, Wallingford UK, pp. 848, 1990

If you need to know the precise pages numbers for a particular reference, then you can download a pdf facsimile of the 1990 edition for free by following the given further down this page under Availability

or

Grove DI, A History of Human Helminthology, Adelaide, Australia: Kindle edition, www.amazon.com, 2015

© David I Grove 2015

 

 Reviews

 

Ash, L.R. Clinical Infectious Diseases

“Anyone with a keen (or even passing) interest in medical history and in knowing more than just the recent developments in the study of particular parasites will enjoy and savor the fascinating tales of our understanding of the major helminthic diseases in humans…this book will certainly serve as the dominant historic reference on helminthic diseases for many years to come, and deservedly so. David Grove has accomplished a major feat and is to be applauded for it.”

 

Ashford, R.W. Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology

“Grove admits in his preface that the preparation of his History of Human Helminthology was a labour of love. A brief skim of his pages quickly reveals that his love has been fully requited…. This is a thoroughly scholarly work, which will deserve a central place in the bookshelf of anyone who wishes to be called a parasitologist, and will enhance the subject for years to come.”

 

Boreham, P.F.L. International Journal for Parasitology

“Reviewing books can be an arduous chore but occasionally a real jewel appears. David Grove has produced such a book… This book can be summed up in one word, ‘scholarly’ and the author should be congratulated on his splendid contribution to the History of Science.”

 

Cook, G.C. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

“This is a major scholarly text and it would be wrong to regard it is an “easy read”…. it is a masterly coverage of a vast series of observations and discoveries relating to those macroparasites which affect … Homo sapiens.

 

Goodwin, C.S. Nature

“Writing in a clear, direct narrative style, Grove retains the reader’s attention and interest, even in the more involved arguments and disputes… A History of Human Helminthology is full of good stories… A splendid achievement, certain to become the standard text on the history of human helminthology for many years.”

 

Nelson, G.S. Journal of Helminthology

“The publication of this book represents a major landmark in the literature of parasitology. It is a monumental achievement by the author, Dr David Grove.”

 

Southgate, V.R. Parasitology Today

“…helminthologists throughout the world will be grateful to David Grove for this tremendous contribution to the history of their subject…. With this work of scholarship David Grove joins those key players; this book will be of immense value as a reference source for parasitologists (in particular helminthologists), physicians and, naturally, for all who are interested in the history of parasitic diseases.

 

Théoridès, J. Annals of Science

“this is very impressive work and the most complete one ever written on the subject…a work deserving the admiration and gratitude of historians of medicine and parasitology.”

 

Warrell, D.A. The Lancet

“The coverage is extremely thorough… Strongly recommended to those interested in helminthology, tropical infectious diseases and geographical medicine, or medical history.”

 

Wilkinson L. Medical History

It is an impressively complete rendering of an intriguing subject… His wife and children … have been richly rewarded for any personal sacrifice if they are as pleased by the result as those with a professional interest in helminths

 

Availability

 

Ebook

 

The Kindle version can be downloaded from www.amazon.com for US$6.99 as from 27 February 2015

 

Print form:

 

This book was originally published as A History of Human Helminthology, CAB International, Wallingford, pp. 848, 1990. It is now out of print as a hard copy.

 

Internet Version

 

It was available for downloading in electronic form from www.red-e2.com from April 2000 - October 2001 but that company has now gone out of business. You can now download if for free (see below)

 

Preface

 

In his History of Tropical Medicine published in 1939, HH Scott wrote : "Ankylostomiasis is almost the only helminthic infestation of man in the tropics which can be said to have a history, at all events a history of sufficient interest to call for any detail". Scott was wrong. Many worms are visible to the naked eye and some have been recognized for millenia. The study of worms has been an integral component of Man's struggle to come to grips with the origins of infectious diseases and the means by which they are transmitted from one to another. This book is an attempt to describe the unfolding of those events which have led to our current understanding of helminths infecting humans. They have occupied many centuries and have been undertaken by diverse men and women in many locations and climes. The first three chapters of the book are general in nature, the next eight are concerned with trematodes (flukes), the next five deal with cestodes (tapeworms and cystic worms), the following eleven consider nematodes (roundworms) and the final chapter covers various miscellaneous items. Chapters concerned with specific worm infections follow a consistent plan, beginning with the discovery of the parasite and then its life cycle, followed by an historical treatment of how the clinical features have been  recognized, diagnostic techniques developed, treatment evolved, the epidemiology understood and preventive and control measures applied. Short biographies of the major research workers are appended at the end of the book. This work has been a labour of love from its conception some dozen years ago till the presentation of the typeset manuscript to the publisher. History is a dynamic subject, and it is my hope that others will build upon and refine all that is recounted herein.

 

Acknowledgements

 

I am very grateful to the University of Western Australia for twelve months' sabbatical leave during which time much of the basic research for this book was undertaken in the United Kingdom. Special tribute must be paid to two key sources. The first is the magnificent Tropical Medicine and Parasitology: Classic Investigations edited by BH Kean, KE Mott and AJ Russell (Cornell University Press, Ithaca, 1978) in which translations of many of the most important original articles are brought together. The second is the Tropical Diseases Bulletin in which the helminthological literature has been abstracted since the early part of this century. Thanks are due to Dr CR Morris for providing a photograph of his grandfather, WH Ransom, to Dr John Walker for  obtaining a photograph of H Dew from the University of Sydney, and to Prof J Bailenger for assistance in collecting biographical details of L Normand and C Bavay. The photographic plates were expertly put together by Mr J Hadaway and Mr C Hentschke. Publication of these plates has been made possible by a generous grant from the Pathology Advisory Fund Committee of the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Woodville, South Australia. This book has been produced on a personal computer using Word  Perfect 5.1 (Word Perfect Corporation, Utah) and Glyphix (SWFTE International, Delaware). Finally, and most importantly, I must express my gratitude to my wife, Marilyn, and my children, Duncan, Graham, Bronwen and Lachlan, for the patience and forbearance they have shown during the many hours that this book has taken to prepare.

 

Tapeworms, lice and prions: a compendium of unpleasant infections, Oxford University Press, pp. 602 including 228 illustrations, Oxford and New York, 2014

 

 Highly Commended in the Popular Medicine category of the 2014 British Medical Association Medical Book Awards

 

 Contents

 

Acknowledgements

viii

I.

I. INFECTION: the search for its causes

1

II.

II. WORMS

4

1.

1. Ascaris —the giant intestinal roundworm

6

2

2. Tapeworms

15

3

3. Hookworm anaemia

28

4

4. Schistosomiasis (sometimes called Bilharziasis)

38

5

5. Filariasis (elephantiasis)

52

III.

III. ARTHROPODS

63

6.

6. Lice (pediculosis)

64

7

7. The itch (scabies)

71

IV

IV. FUNGI

79

8.

8. Tinea (ringworm etc.)

82

9.

9. Candidiasis (thrush)

89

V.

V. PROTOZOA

95

10,

10. Giardiasis

96

11.

11. Amoebic dysentery and liver abscess

102

12.

12. Malaria

115

13.

13. Sleeping sickness (African trypanosomiasis)

136

14.

14. Cutaneous leishmaniasis (Oriental sore) and visceral leishmaniasis (kala azar)

149

15.

15. Chagas disease (South American trypanosomiasis

162

VI.

VI. BACTERIA

172

16.

16. The germ theory of disease

174

17.

17. Anthrax

196

18.

18. Tuberculosis (consumption)

202

19.

19. Leprosy (Hansen’s disease)

218

20.

20. The golden staphylococcus

228

21.

21. The pus-forming streptococcus

237

22.

22. The pneumococcus and pneumonia

250

23.

23. Gonorrhoea (the clap)

259

24.

24. Syphilis (the pox)

269

25.

25. The meningococcus and meningitis

284

26.

26. Diphtheria

291

27.

27. Whooping cough (pertussis)

302

28.

28. Cholera

311

29.

29. Typhoid fever

324

30.

30. Escherichia coli                                                                               

339

31.

31. Bacillary dysentery (shigellosis)

348

32.

32. Tetanus (lockjaw)

357

33.

33. Plague (the Black Death)

365

34.

34. Brucellosis (undulant fever)

379

35.

35. Legionnaires’ disease

387

36.

36. Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcers

394

37.

37. Typhus

403

38.

38. Chlamydia , trachoma, and urethritis

414

VII.

VII. VIRUSES

424

39.

39. The discovery of viruses and determination of their nature

427

40.

40. Smallpox (variola)

437

41.

41. Rabies (hydrophobia)

443

42.

42. Yellow fever

449

43.

43. Dengue fever (break bone fever)

458

44.

44. Poliomyelitis (infantile paralysis)

464

45.

45. Measles (rubeola)

471

46.

46. German measles (rubella)

475

47.

47. Mumps

489

48.

48. Varicella (chickenpox and shingles)

485

49.

49. Herpes simplex (cold sores and more)

494

50.

50. Glandular fever (infectious mononucleosis)

499

51.

51. Influenza (the flu)

504

52.

52. Viral hepatitis (A, B, and C)

512

53.

53. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome

524

VIII.

VIII. PRIONS

535

54.

54. Kuru, mad cows, and variant Creutzfeldt–Jacob Disease

536

IX.

IX . UNDE VENIS ET QUO VADIS?

549

References

553

Glossary

571

Notes on Pronunciation

578

Further reading

579

Person Index

581

Subject Index

599

 

Who is this book for?

 

Any intelligent layperson interested in the history of infectious diseases, including college and university students. It might stimulate your child in senior high school to consider health as a career. No medical knowledge is assumed. It will be particularly valuable for anyone already working in the medical, nursing or health science professions.

 

Why this title?

 

You cannot argue with the publisher, particularly when they are as prestigious as Oxford University Press. My proposed title was Catching the culprits: discovering the causes of the major infectious diseases of mankind. That title not only was a pun (a play on words) but had the virtue of describing what this book is about.

 

What is this book about?

 

The people who recognised the clinical features of the most important infectious diseases afflicting humans and  discovered their causative infectious agents, when they did this, where it happened, how they achieved it and what drove them to do it.

 

This is further described in this extract from the first chapter - Infection: the search for its causes:

 

This book is concerned with the discovery of the most important infectious agents throughout history and in our own time, who discovered them, and how they were related to the diseases that they caused. In 1894, Robert Louis Stevenson died in Samoa at the age of 44 from tuberculosis. He once said that it is not a hard thing to know what to write; the hard thing is to know what to leave out. That has been my problem too. It is perforce a matter of my judgement.

     You can read any individual chapter with profit if you are particularly interested in a certain disease or particular organism. However, you will gain more benefit if you read it from beginning to end. This is because the book is arranged in a manner which roughly reflects both the size of the organisms and the order in which they were discovered. It therefore somewhat matches the development and maturation of ideas in infectious diseases and the progressive introduction of novel, powerful technologies that have allowed new discoveries. Furthermore, technical terms or words tend to be defined the first time that they are used. If you are uncertain of the meaning of a word, flip over to the glossary near the end of the book and it may well be defined there. There is also a box there telling you how pronounce unfamiliar words.

     We begin with multicellular infectious agents – the worms, arthropods and some fungi (the moulds). We then turn to single-celled creatures, first yeasts (also fungi) and protozoa. All of these organisms are like us in that they have a well-defined nucleus, so they are classified as eukaryotes. Next we examine the bacteria, a group of organisms now classified as prokaryotes, which although they have DNA and RNA, do not have a well-defined nucleus. Then we review viruses which have no nucleus at all and must live inside another eukaryotic cell. Finally we reach the enigmatic proteinaceous prions.

     Medical scientists have made enormous progress, especially over the last 150 years or so. But it has not been easy. It is a tale at one time or another of dogged determination, perseverance, flashes of insight, luck, serendipity, argument, dispute and, on occasion, tremendous bravery. We owe an incalculable debt to those who have gone before us.

 

Availability

 

Hard cover book

 

It can be obtained from any good bookstore or ordered over the internet from a multiplicity of sites such as:

 

www.amazon.com

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Ebooks

 

Kindle ebooks  for kindle, kindle for pc and kindle for ipad can be obtained from various Amazon sites including:

 

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Nook ebook

 

Nook ebook can be obtained from:

 

www.barnesandnoble.com

 

epub ebook

 

www.dymocks.com.au

 

Reviews

 

Helen Rumbelow, The Times, 8 March 2014

 

“It is said that celebrities turn to each new biography of their peers and scan the index to see if they are listed among their conquests. All of us, from the most common to the most mighty, can get a similar thrill from this lovely book with its pleasingly macabre title… David Grove, a world expert in infectious diseases, is our host, and like many such doctors, a surprisingly jocular one. He reveres his little critters, but far more than that, he reveres the long line of medical heroes who have enabled us to take revenge on them… It is their stories … that light up this book”

 

Anonymous, The Northern Echo (UK) 24 March 2014

 

“Humans might be the dominant species on the planet, but boy, how they are afflicted by a whole range of organisms from viruses and bacteria to fungi and small parasite animals... Grove documents the stories of many of these agents of disease which have been the curse of mankind for millenia and it makes for unpleasant if fascinating reading.”

 

Lindsay Buckland, The Scotsman, 3 April 2014

 

“Inside this 600-page tome there are intriguing chapters on subjects such as ‘The pus-forming streptococcus’, ‘the Itch (Scabies)’ and ‘Syphilis (The Pox)"... This ... is clearly a must-read for medical students and those working in the field of medicine.”

 

WF Bynum, The Times Literary Supplement 23 May 2014

 

“It is a kind of historical textbook with major sections grouped by the kinds of organisms that can infect us... Grove is most interested in the historical figures who got it "right" or nearly right, since scientific knowledge is cumulative. He also has a good eye for powerful figures who got it "wrong" and thereby hindered others. If this sounds like oldfashioned history of the kind historians decry as "Whiggish", that is because it is. It is also very well done and no doubt avant-garde relativists will need to crib from it surreptitiously… Grove has read many of the original papers and summarizes them succinctly and accurately... Bacteria (and) viruses occupy the lion's share of Grove's book. He shows that he can write synthetic history with a fine introductory essay on the development of the germ theory, before turning to the major bacteriological diseases”

 

Joseph R. Lentino, M.D., Ph.D, Doody's Health Sciences Book Review, 2014 

 

 “Not your standard textbook, this is a compilation of fascinating short stories about the field of infectious diseases, that also manages to be a history lesson. The book is easy to read, so that students from high school on up can learn both microbiology and history… it is a series of stories relating the discovery of a new organism the diseases associated with that organism, and who, how, when and where it came to be known. This makes the material accessible to the general public as well as to scholars. The author’s writing style draws readers into the subject with an inviting narrative about each organism. I hope this is not the last edition, for the stories in here are timeless, and they can be supplemented with new ones in future editions. Both high school and, certainly, college students can benefit from this book.”

 

Dr Alan Pike, The Biologist, volume 61 number 5, 2014

 

“This book is for anyone who requires an historical account of around 50 human parasitic diseases (microorganisms included)…The author has collected, no doubt with determination and dedication, more than 500 pages of text on the discovery and unravelling of parasite life cycles and the transmission of infectious microorganisms, complete with photographs of the men … who pieced together the evidence and produced the answers to the conundrums… the author is to be congratulated on a substantial body of knowledge presented in a largely engaging manner… At 25 pounds, this book is a snip [ie a surprisingly cheap item, a bargain] and should be on everyone’s reading list.”

 

Highly Commended in the Popular Medicine category of the 2014 British Medical Association Medical Book Awards, Anonymous. bma.org.uk  Search for BMA Book Awards 2014

 

“I would definitely recommend this book to clinicians and scientists as an interesting read of history and discovery as well as to students to provide inspiration… The style of writing is lively and draws the reader in very effectively… There are good explanations of scientific terms throughout the text and a glossary which would be helpful to the general reader… I enjoyed the author’s use of personal anecdote and descriptions of personalities of some of the discoverers which give the stories immediate and human appeal… This book brings alive the narrative of these great discoveries: the personalities of the scientists and clinicians and how this helped them in their work, the leaps of faith, serendipity, methodical research, blind alleys, rivalries, non-ethical research that was all brought to bear in discovering the organisms of disease… The author has a lively writing style which flows easily. There are clear, simple explanations throughout… The examples of non-ethical research eg in the discovery of hepatitis are fascinating and very well-told. I enjoyed the way in which the author makes very clear the way in which various organisms and modes of transmission were discovered… The writing is also inspirational… I also enjoyed the personal narrative of the author throughout, his own stories, his opinion and his outrage at various medical crimes of the past.”

 

Anonymous, Blood Group History Community

www.facebook.com/pages/Blood-Group-History/174667355938516, 12 February 2015

 

“Strictly speaking, this book about infectious organisms is not “blood group”-related. Yet most of the organisms and diseases discussed are familiar to blood bankers from our training and the patients we help. Anyone familiar with the history of immunology will recognize many familiar names among the scientists profiled…. While the book is descriptive of the organisms and diseases they cause, their stories are told in a historical manner with biographical insights into the researchers that should delight anyone interested in the history of medicine. Great both as a book to read straight-through and as a reference book to pull off the shelf and consult individual chapters as needed.”

 

Anonymous, Quarterly Review of Biology Number 91, Number 3, September 2016

 

“This book will be a great read for biologists interested in the history of infectious diseases.”

 

Medicine in the Bible: a 21st century perspective, independently published at www.amazon.com, 256 pages including 23 illustrations, 2020

 

Contents

 

1.

Introduction

1

2.

Prehistory – from the beginning until Abraham c. 2000 BC

2

3.

The Patriarchs – from c. 2000 BC to c. 1700 BC

20

4.

The Exodus – c. 1450 or c.1250 BC

40

5.

The time of the Judges – c. 1400 BC or 1200 BC to c. 1000 BC

69

6.

The reign of Kings: the united kingdom – c. 1000 BC to c. 930 BC

81

7.

The reign of Kings: the northern kingdom of Israel – c.930 BC to c. 720 BC

96

8.

The reign of Kings: the southern kingdom of Judah - c. 930 BC to c. 586 BC

105

9.

The Babylonian Exile and Post-exilic period – c. 586 BC onwards

113

10.

Jesus Christ – c. 5 BC to c. 33 AD

130

11.

Other people in the Gospels – c. 5 BC to c. 33 AD

187

12.

The birth of the Church – c. 33 AD onwards

201

13.

References

232

14.

Bible versions

241

15.

Sources of illustrations

242

16.

About the author

244

17.

Index of Bible verses

245

18.

General index

251

 

About this book

 

This book is concerned with medical matters in the Bible. Medicine is built upon a foundation in biology but in its broadest sense is concerned with how the body works (anatomy, physiology and biochemistry), what happens when the body becomes diseased (pathology and clinical features), deciding what is wrong with an ill person (diagnosis), forecasting the likely outcome of that illness taking into account the available treatments (prognosis), what options are available for curing the disease or at least ameliorating the symptoms (treatment or therapeutics) and what measures can be taken to prevent certain diseases (public health).Some topics consider matters of basic biology such as when and where we human beings came from, or public health measures such as the Jewish hygiene laws. Mostly however, we are concerned with diagnosis because the information we have been given concerns symptoms and signs and sometimes consequences. In many cases, it is possible to make educated guesses as to the nature of the illnesses described in both the Old and New Testaments. Often, there are a number of possibilities – there is a differential diagnosis. This book is written from an evangelical yet a solid scientific Christian perspective. For example, with regard to the healing miracles of Jesus, they are accepted as just that – miracles; we are primarily interested in trying to unravel the natures of the illnesses afflicting those whom Jesus healed rather than wonder how he healed them. We do, however, trespass into the realm of speculation when we consider the foundational events of the Christian faith – the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. In order to provide a logical framework, the medical matters for discussion have been arranged in in eras ranging from prehistory to the birth of the church. Each topic is usually preceded by a quotation of the relevant passage from the English Standard Version of the Bible so that you may follow the argument easily. In the last fifty years, an increasing number of articles on biblical matters have appeared in the medical literature. References to many of these and other publications are cited throughout the text and may be pursued at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed. This will usually take you to an abstract (summary) of the paper and many of them have a link from which you can download a free copy of the article. Nevertheless, I have always tried, to make clear my interpretation of the events under discussion. In printed form, this book would occupy 256 pages and has 23 illustrations

 

Availability

 

Both Kindle ebook and paperback editions are available from www.amazon.com

 

Pioneers in infectious diseases: from Hippocrates to the coronavirus,independently published at www.amazon.com, 373 pages with multiple portraits, 2020

 

Contents

 

Introduction ................................................................................................... 1

Hippocrates..................................................................................................... 6

Antonie van Leeuwenhoek............................................................................. 8

John Hunter................................................................................................... 11

Edward Jenner.............................................................................................. 13

Alfred Donné................................................................................................. 19

Angelo Dubini................................................................................................ 21

Ignaz Semmelweis......................................................................................... 23

Theodor Bilharz............................................................................................. 27

John Snow..................................................................................................... 30

Carl von Siebold............................................................................................ 35

Charles-Philippe Robin.................................................................................. 38

Friedrich Küchenmeister............................................................................... 40

William Budd................................................................................................. 46

Vilem Lambl................................................................................................... 49

Friedrich Zenker............................................................................................ 51

Rudolf Leuckart............................................................................................. 53

Louis Pasteur................................................................................................. 55

Casimir Davaine............................................................................................. 62

Jean-Nicholas Demarquay............................................................................ 65

Joseph Lister.................................................................................................. 67

Aleksej Fedchenko........................................................................................ 72

Armauer Hansen........................................................................................... 74

James McConnell.......................................................................................... 78

John O'Neill................................................................................................... 80

Fedor Lesh..................................................................................................... 82

Louis Normand and Arthur Bavay................................................................. 85

Robert Koch................................................................................................... 87

Patrick Manson............................................................................................. 97

Joseph and Thomas Bancroft...................................................................... 101

Alexander Ogston........................................................................................ 104

Albert Neisser.............................................................................................. 108

Battista Grassi............................................................................................. 112

Beverley Ringer........................................................................................... 115

Alphonse Laveran........................................................................................ 117

Edwin Klebs................................................................................................. 120

Carlos Finlay................................................................................................ 125

Max Braun................................................................................................... 128

Walther and Fanny Hesse and Richard Petri.............................................. 130

Hans Christian Gram................................................................................... 133

Georg Gaffky............................................................................................... 135

Friedrich Loeffler......................................................................................... 137

Theodor Escherich...................................................................................... 140

Arthur Nicolaier........................................................................................... 142

David Cunningham...................................................................................... 145

Camillo Golgi............................................................................................... 146

Carl Friedländer and Albert Fraenkel.......................................................... 149

Anton Weichselbaum.................................................................................. 154

David Bruce................................................................................................. 156

Emile Roux................................................................................................... 162

Shibasaburo Kitasato.................................................................................. 164

Emil Behring................................................................................................ 169

Ettore Marchiafava..................................................................................... 172

Alexandre Yersin......................................................................................... 174

Bernhard Bang............................................................................................ 178

Kyoshi Shiga................................................................................................ 180

Paul-Louis Simond....................................................................................... 183

Peter Borovsky............................................................................................ 186

Ronald Ross................................................................................................. 188

Walter Reed................................................................................................ 193

Everett Dutton............................................................................................ 196

Arthur Looss................................................................................................ 198

Aldo Castellani............................................................................................. 201

William Leishman........................................................................................ 204

Charles Donovan......................................................................................... 206

Fritz Schaudinn and Erich Hoffmann.......................................................... 208

Fujiro Katsurada.......................................................................................... 212

Themistocles Zammit.................................................................................. 214

Jules Bordet and Octave Gengou................................................................ 217

Ludwig Halberstaedter................................................................................ 220

Stanislaus von Prowazek............................................................................. 223

Percy Ashburn and Charles Craig................................................................ 225

Carlos Chagas.............................................................................................. 227

Oswaldo Cruz.............................................................................................. 231

Robert Leiper.............................................................................................. 232

Charles Nicolle............................................................................................. 235

Karl Landsteiner.......................................................................................... 239

Akira Fujinami............................................................................................. 241

Howard Ricketts.......................................................................................... 243

Raimond Sabouraud.................................................................................... 245

Antonio Carini............................................................................................. 247

Harujiro Kobayashi...................................................................................... 249

Keinosuke Miyairi and Masatsuga Suzuki................................................... 250

Henrique da Rocha Lima............................................................................. 252

Koan Nakagawa........................................................................................... 254

John Cleland................................................................................................ 256

Francis Stewart............................................................................................ 259

Konstanty Janicki......................................................................................... 261

Masatomo Muto......................................................................................... 263

Claude Barlow............................................................................................. 264

Ernest Goodpasture.................................................................................... 266

George and Gladys Dick.............................................................................. 268

Donald Blacklock......................................................................................... 272

Alexander Fleming...................................................................................... 274

Hugh and Edith Macdonald........................................................................ 278

Wilson Smith, Christopher Andrewes and Patrick Laidlaw......................... 280

Gerhard Domagk......................................................................................... 283

Albert Sabin................................................................................................. 286

Edward Derrick and MacFarlane Burnet..................................................... 289

Saul Adler.................................................................................................... 293

Howard Florey............................................................................................. 295

Norman Gregg............................................................................................. 300

John Bray..................................................................................................... 302

John Enders................................................................................................. 304

Thomas Weller............................................................................................ 306

Jonas Salk.................................................................................................... 308

Edgar Hope-Simpson................................................................................... 311

Carleton Gajdusek....................................................................................... 313

Saul Krugman.............................................................................................. 317

Baruch Blumberg......................................................................................... 320

Werner and Gertrude Henle....................................................................... 323

William Hutchison....................................................................................... 326

Joseph McDade........................................................................................... 328

Robert Gallo................................................................................................ 330

Stanley Prusiner.......................................................................................... 333

Luc Montagnier and Françoise Barré-Sinoussi........................................... 336

Barry Marshall and Robin Warren.............................................................. 340

Kary Mullis................................................................................................... 344

Harald zur Hausen....................................................................................... 348

Michael Houghton and colleagues............................................................. 350

The Coronavirus.......................................................................................... 353

Sources of Illustrations................................................................................ 362

Person Index................................................................................................ 366

Subject Index............................................................................................... 371

 

About this book

 

One particular infectious disease is now as the forefront of our lives. Even most schoolchildren know about "the virus" or coronavirus or Covid-19. It is a reminder that until the development of vaccines and the discovery of antibiotics and more recently some antiviral agents, infectious diseases were part and parcel of everyday life for generations. Illness and death from one infectious disease or another were always at hand and were greeted with dread and despair. How were these diseases and the organisms that caused them discovered and tackled? For this we have to thank our forebears who, over the last 200 years particularly, have tackled these problems, sometimes at great personal risk, and solved many of the mysteries. This book provides short biographies of over 130 of the key players. Not only does it give succinct summaries of the discoveries that they made, it gives wherever possible, details of their lives and families. Most of these investigators lived in the last 200 years. Some names like Pasteur and Fleming will be familiar whereas others such as Koch, Florey and Mullis deserve to be better known. The whole gamut of infectious agents that they pursued are considered including bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, worms, ectoparasites and prions.

 

Availability

 

Both Kindle ebook and paperback editions are available from www.amazon.com

 

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