A History of Human HelminthologyHe

 

 


 

 

Contents

 

Reviews

 

Availability

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preface to the Kindle edition (2015) – from www.amazon.com for US$6.99

 

Technology has advanced enormously since the publication of the book edition (1990) and the CD version (1996). Transmission of ebooks via the Internet is how so commonplace and Amazon has provided a platform to make them available. The copyright was returned to me by the original publishers, CABInternational, in 1995 so I have now converted the book to kindle format. The opportunity was taken to correct any typographical errors and make minor updates of the text, mostly related to changes in biological or geographical nomenclature that have occurred over the last quarter century, corrections to original Greek words and provision of the given or Christian names of hundreds of the more obscure investigators, courtesy of that marvellous invention, the Internet. In addition, a few extra biographical notes and photographs or portraits have been included as have several “2015 updates” to the text. I hope you find this work both enjoyable and informative. If you cite from this work in a scientific publication, please do so in a manner similar to either:

 

Grove DI, A History of Human Helminthology, CABInternational, Wallingford UK, pp. 848, 1990

If you need to know the precise pages numbers for a particular reference, then you can download a pdf facsimile of the 1990 edition for free by following the given further down this page under Availability

or

Grove DI, A History of Human Helminthology, Adelaide, Austalia: Kindle edition, www.amazon.com, 2015

 

David Grove

MBBS MD DSc FRACP FRCPA DTM&H

Adelaide

Australia, 2015

            

© David I Grove 2015

 

 

 

Contents

 

Preface ....................................................................................................................................... vii

Acknowledgements .................................................................................................................... viii

1.       The nomenclature and classification of worms ...................................................................... 1

2.       Understanding the origin and transmission of worms .......................................................... 33

3.       The discovery and development of anthelmintics ................................................................ 75

4.       Fasciola hepatica and fascioliasis .................................................................................. 103

5.       Fasciolopsis buski and fasciolopsiasis ............................................................................ 127

6.       Clonorchis sinensis and clonorchiasis ............................................................................ 141

7.       Paragonimus westermani and paragonimiasis ............................................................... 159

8.       Schistosoma haematobium and schistosomiasis haematobia .......................................... 187

9.       Schistosoma mansoni and schistosomiasis mansoni ........................................................ 233

10.     Schistosoma japonicum and schistosomiasis japonica .................................................... 263

11.     Trematode infections of lesser importance ....................................................................... 297

12.     Echinococcus granulosus and echinococcosis or hydatid disease ................................... 319

13.     Taenia solium and taeniasis solium and cysticercosis ...................................................... 355

14.     Taenia saginata and taeniasis saginata ........................................................................... 385

15.     Diphyllobothrium latum and diphyllobothriasis .............................................................. 397

16.     Cestode infections of lesser importance ........................................................................... 421

17.     Enterobius vermicularis and enterobiasis ...................................................................... 439

18.     Trichuris trichiura and trichuriasis ................................................................................. 455

19.     Ascaris lumbricoides and ascariasis ............................................................................... 469

20.     Ancylostoma duodenale, Necator americanus and hookworm disease ......................... 499

21.     Strongyloides stercoralis and strongyloidiasis ................................................................ 543

22.     Trichinella spiralis and trichinosis .................................................................................. 571

23.     Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia species and filariasis ........................................................ 597

24.     Loa loa and loiasis ......................................................................................................... 641

25.     Onchocerca volvulus and onchocerciasis ....................................................................... 661

26.     Dracunculus medinensis and Guinea worm disease ....................................................... 693

27.     Nematode infections of lesser importance ........................................................................ 721

28.     Miscellanea .................................................................................................................... 765

29.     Biographies ...................................................................................................................... 83

Person index ............................................................................................................................ 823

Subject index ........................................................................................................................... 836

 

Reviews

 

Ash, L.R. Clinical Infectious Diseases

 

“Anyone with a keen (or even passing) interest in medical history and in knowing more than just the recent developments in the study of particular parasites will enjoy and savor the fascinating tales of our understanding of the major helminthic diseases in humans…this book will certainly serve as the dominant historic reference on helminthic diseases for many years to come, and deservedly so. David Grove has accomplished a major feat and is to be applauded for it.”

 

Ashford, R.W. Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology

 

“Grove admits in his preface that the preparation of his History of Human Helminthology was a labour of love. A brief skim of his pages quickly reveals that his love has been fully requited…. This is a thoroughly scholarly work, which will deserve a central place in the bookshelf of anyone who wishes to be called a parasitologist, and will enhance the subject for years to come.”

 

Boreham, P.F.L. International Journal for Parasitology

 

“Reviewing books can be an arduous chore but occasionally a real jewel appears. David Grove has produced such a book… This book can be summed up in one word, ‘scholarly’ and the author should be congratulated on his splendid contribution to the History of Science.”

 

Cook, G.C. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

 

“This is a major scholarly text and it would be wrong to regard it is an “easy read”…. it is a masterly coverage of a vast series of observations and discoveries relating to those macroparasites which affect … Homo sapiens.

 

Goodwin, C.S. Nature

 

“Writing in a clear, direct narrative style, Grove retains the reader’s attention and interest, even in the more involved arguments and disputes… A History of Human Helminthology is full of good stories… A splendid achievement, certain to become the standard text on the history of human helminthology for many years.”

 

Nelson, G.S. Journal of Helminthology

 

“The publication of this book represents a major landmark in the literature of parasitology. It is a monumental achievement by the author, Dr David Grove.”

 

Southgate, V.R. Parasitology Today

 

“…helminthologists throughout the world will be grateful to David Grove for this tremendous contribution to the history of their subject…. With this work of scholarship David Grove joins those key players; this book will be of immense value as a reference source for parasitologists (in particular helminthologists), physicians and, naturally, for all who are interested in the history of parasitic diseases.

Théoridès, J. Annals of Science

 

“this is very impressive work and the most complete one ever written on the subject…a work deserving the admiration and gratitude of historians of medicine and parasitology.”

 

Warrell, D.A. The Lancet

 

“The coverage is extremely thorough… Strongly recommended to those interested in helminthology, tropical infectious diseases and geographical medicine, or medical history.”

 

Wilkinson L. Medical History

 

It is an impressively complete rendering of an intriguing subject… His wife and children … have been richly rewarded for any personal sacrifice if they are as pleased by the result as those with a professional interest in helminths

 

Availability

 

Ebook

 

The Kindle version can be downloaded from www.amazon.com for US$6.99 as from 27 February 2015

 

Print form:

 

This book was originally published as A History of Human Helminthology, CAB International, Wallingford, pp. 848, 1990. It is now out of print as a hard copy.

 

Internet Version

 

It was available for downloading in electronic form from www.red-e2.com from April 2000 - October 2001 but that company has now gone out of business. You can now download if for free (see below)

 

The facsimile version (4.358 Mb) of the 1990 edition can be downloaded from this site. It is free. I only ask that if you make reference to any part of it, you  refer to A History of Human Helminthology, CAB International, Wallingford, pp. 848, 1990.

 

Click here to download the facsimile version of A History of Human Helminthology

 

Preface

 

In his History of Tropical Medicine published in 1939, HH Scott wrote : "Ankylostomiasis is almost the only helminthic infestation of man in the tropics which can be said to have a history, at all events a history of sufficient interest to call for any detail". Scott was wrong. Many worms are visible to the naked eye and some have been recognized for millenia. The study of worms has been an integral component of Man's struggle to come to grips with the origins of infectious diseases and the means by which they are transmitted from one to another. This book is an attempt to describe the unfolding of those events which have led to our current understanding of helminths infecting humans. They have occupied many centuries and have been undertaken by diverse men and women in many locations and climes. The first three chapters of the book are general in nature, the next eight are concerned with trematodes (flukes), the next five deal with cestodes (tapeworms and cystic worms), the following eleven consider nematodes (roundworms) and the final chapter covers various miscellaneous items. Chapters concerned with specific worm infections follow a consistent plan, beginning with the discovery of the parasite and then its life cycle, followed by an historical treatment of how the clinical features have been  recognized, diagnostic techniques developed, treatment evolved, the epidemiology understood and preventive and control measures applied. Short biographies of the major research workers are appended at the end of the book. This work has been a labour of love from its conception some dozen years ago till the presentation of the typeset manuscript to the publisher. History is a dynamic subject, and it is my hope that others will build upon and refine all that is recounted herein.

 

Acknowledgements

 

I am very grateful to the University of Western Australia for twelve months' sabbatical leave during which time much of the basic research for this book was undertaken in the United Kingdom. Special tribute must be paid to two key sources. The first is the magnificent Tropical Medicine and Parasitology: Classic Investigations edited by BH Kean, KE Mott and AJ Russell (Cornell University Press, Ithaca, 1978) in which translations of many of the most important original articles are brought together. The second is the Tropical Diseases Bulletin in which the helminthological literature has been abstracted since the early part of this century. Thanks are due to Dr CR Morris for providing a photograph of his grandfather, WH Ransom, to Dr John Walker for  obtaining a photograph of H Dew from the University of Sydney, and to Prof J Bailenger for assistance in collecting biographical details of L Normand and C Bavay. The photographic plates were expertly put together by Mr J Hadaway and Mr C Hentschke. Publication of these plates has been made possible by a generous grant from the Pathology Advisory Fund Committee of the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Woodville, South Australia. This book has been produced on a personal computer using Word  Perfect 5.1 (Word Perfect Corporation, Utah) and Glyphix (SWFTE International, Delaware). Finally, and most importantly, I must express my gratitude to my wife, Marilyn, and my children, Duncan, Graham, Bronwen and Lachlan, for the patience and forbearance they have shown during the many hours that this book has taken to prepare.

 

 

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