DESCENDANTS OF RICHARD KINGSMILL

THIS PAGE IS OF MY KINGSMILL FAMILY IN ENGLAND, IRELAND and AUSTRALIA

 The Lincoln’s Inn today stands partly on land that was formerly held on a tenancy from the Hospital of Burton Lazars, and partly on land (the southern part) that was once owned by the Bishops of Chichester. All the land was conveyed to the Inn on November 12, 1580; and the mill-rinds displayed in the arms of the Inn were derived from the arms of Richard Kingsmill [13], a bencher who played a leading part in the acquisition. ("Mill-rind" is the heraldic name for an iron support for a moving millstone).

 

 

First Generation

 

      1. Richard* KINGSMILL 1  was born in 1415 in Barkham, Berks, England.

 

Bailiff of Basingstoke 1456; lessee of Basingstoke hospital property from Merton College 1455-79. His

family, whose original name was Castlemayne, resided at Basingstoke from the 12th to the 16th Century,

having received a grant of the Royal Mil l there, from which they derived their name.

 

***

 

The Kingsmill family appears frequently in records of Barkham. John Kingsmill (de Kyngesmalle) was

resident in the parish in 1327, and the names of John Kingsmill and Adam his son and Elizabeth wife of

Adam occur in 1337.  Thomas Kingsmill and Richard his brother, living in 1476, are called sons of William

Kingsmill of Barkham, deceased.  Richard Kingsmill of Barkham was father of John Kingsmill, justice of

the Common Pleas, who died in 1504 and whose daughter Alice married Thomas Bullock of Arborfield.

His son Sir John Kingsmill was of Sydmonton, Hants, and was the ancestor of Elizabeth Brice (see

manor), whose husband Robert Brice took the name and arms of Kingsmill in 1766 and was created a

baronet in 1800.

 

 

Richard* had the following children:

 

+           2 M        i.  Richard * KINGSMILL  died in May 1511.

 

 

Second Generation

 

      2. Richard * KINGSMILL  ""of Doberton""2,3,4,5  (Richard*) was born in Basingstoke, England. He died in May 1511. He was buried in May 1511 in St Michael's Church, Basingstoke.

 

Of Doberton Manor; collector of the subsidy for South Hants 1463; Bailiff of Basingstoke 1464 & 87.

Entertained Catherine of Aragon for the night of 4 Nov 1501 on her way to be married to Prince Arthur.

***

CP 25/1/202/42, number 35.

County:              Somerset.

Place: Westminster.

Date:   The day after St John the Baptist, 17 Henry VII [25 June 1502].

Parties:                John Rythe, querent, and Richard Kyngesmyll' and Alice, his wife, deforciants.

Property:            1 messuage, 16 acres of land and 12 acres of meadow in Bayford'.

Action:                Plea of covenant.

Agreement:         Richard and Alice have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of John, as those

which he has of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Alice

to him and his heirs for ever.

Warranty:           Warranty.

For this:              John has granted to Richard and Alice the tenements and has rendered them to them in

the same court, to hold to Richard and Alice, of the chief lords for the lives of Richard and Alice, and after

their decease the tenements shall remain to John Walshe and Thomasia, his wife, and the heirs of the

body of Thomasia, to hold of the chief lords for ever. In default of such heirs, successive remainders (1)

to the heirs of the body of Alice and (2) to the right heirs of Alice.

 

 

Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)

Persons:              John Rythe, Richard Kingsmill, Alice Kingsmill, John Walsh, Thomasia Walsh

Places:                 Bayford

***

Kingsmill Richard d 1511

 

His Will was made the 17th March 1510 and died at Basingstoke before the 28th of May 1511, the date

of the probate of his Will. He is burried near his Wife Alice in the Church of St. Michael's at Basingstoke,

England. Richard Kingsmill the common ancestor of the English and Irish branches of the Kingsmill

Family of Basingstoke, Hants., and Barkham, Berks., was descended from Peter de KINGSMULIN, to

whom a grant of  and at Bretford, near Salisbury, was made [ temp.Henry III,post 1216]_ Richard

Kingsmill was living in Basingstoke in the 3rd year of Edward IV, 1463.  He entertained at his house there,

by previous official arrangement on the 4th of November, 1501 the infanta Catherine of Arragon and her

suite on her way to be married to Arthur Prince of Wales, Henry III eldest Brother.

 

***

 

The Kingsmill family appears frequently in records of Barkham. John Kingsmill (de Kyngesmalle) was

resident in the parish in 1327, and the names of John Kingsmill and Adam his son and Elizabeth wife of

Adam occur in 1337.  Thomas Kingsmill and Richard his brother, living in 1476, are called sons of William

Kingsmill of Barkham, deceased.  Richard Kingsmill of Barkham was father of John Kingsmill, justice of

the Common Pleas, who died in 1504 and whose daughter Alice married Thomas Bullock of Arborfield.

His son Sir John Kingsmill was of Sydmonton, Hants, and was the ancestor of Elizabeth Brice (see

manor), whose husband Robert Brice took the name and arms of Kingsmill in 1766 and was created a

baronet in 1800.

 

Richard married Alice* .

 

They had the following children:

 

+           3 M        i.  John* KINGSMILL  was born about 1456. He died on 11 May 1509.

               4 F         ii.  Mary KINGSMILL  was born about 1468.

               5          iii.  Others KINGSMILL  was born about 1471.

               6 F        iv.  Alice KINGSMILL  was born about 1475.

Alice married Thomas BULLOCK . Thomas was born about 1475.

 

 

Third Generation

 

      3. John* KINGSMILL 6,7,8,9  (Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1456 in Whitchurch, Hampshire, England. He died on 11 May 1509.

 

John* was employed as Justice of the Common Pleas in 1499. He was employed as One of the feoffees in the will of Henry VII..

 

He was Judge of the common Pleas in 1499. One of the feoffees in the will of Henry VII. He died in 1509

 

***

 

The Kingsmill family appears frequently in records of Barkham. John Kingsmill (de Kyngesmalle) was

resident in the parish in 1327, and the names of John Kingsmill and Adam his son and Elizabeth wife of

Adam occur in 1337.  Thomas Kingsmill and Richard his brother, living in 1476, are called sons of William

 

Kingsmill of Barkham, deceased.  Richard Kingsmill of Barkham was father of John Kingsmill, justice of

the Common Pleas, who died in 1504 and whose daughter Alice married Thomas Bullock of Arborfield.

His son Sir John Kingsmill was of Sydmonton, Hants, and was the ancestor of Elizabeth Brice (see

manor), whose husband Robert Brice took the name and arms of Kingsmill in 1766 and was created a

baronet in 1800.

 

John* married Jane* GIFFORD (GIFFARD) 10,11,12  daughter of Sir John* GIFFORD (GIFFARD) and Joan* BRYDGES. Jane* was born about 1424 in Itchell, Hampshire, England.

 

 

They had the following children:

 

+           7 M        i.  Sir John* KINGSMILL  was born about 1494. He died on 11 Aug 1559.

 

+           8 F         ii.  Alice KINGSMILL  was born about 1497.

               9 F        iii.  Mary KINGSMILL  was born about 1499.

Mary married Richard WALLER . Richard was born about 1495.

             10 F        iv.  Morphuet KINGSMILL 13 .

 

Morphuet was employed as Abbesses of Wherwell in 1536 in Winchester.

 

There are few incidents in the story of Wherwell Abbey, that find a place in history after

the Norman Conquest. The holy quiet work of unostentatious love and duty went on

through centuries with untold benefits to those living in the parts around, but making

little mark on the wider world beyond. With the Conquest the Eoyal line ceased to have

any personal associations with the neighbourhood, and ladies of local or other families

occupied the position of Superior, which had once, at any rate, been held by the King's

sister. The troubles of the Idngdom however did not pass over without bringing their

share to the usually peaceful dwellers in the valley of the Test. William of Malmsbury

tells us during the contest between King Stephen and the Empress Maud :-

 

The voads ou every side of "Winchester were watched by the Queen and the Earls

who had eome with her, lest the supplies sliould be brought in to those who had sworn

fidelity to the Empress. The town of Andever also was burnt. . . . The abbey of nuns at

Warewel was also burnt by one William de Ipres, an abandoned character Avho feared

neither God nor man, because some of the partisans of the Empress had secured

themselves within it.

 

To Mr. W. Money's History of Newbury, page 84, is the following quote : -

 

In the course of coustructiug a uew line from Hurstbourue Siding to FuUevtou Junction

by the South-Western Railway Company in the Autumn of 1883, eight human

skeletons Avere unearthed at Wherwell. They were found very close together - about

two feet below the surface and they wei-e probably the remains of soldiers who fell in

this encounter between the troops of Stephen and Matilda.

 

A list of the Abbesses of Wherwell is given in Diigdale, to which some additions are

here made : -

Heaufled was abbess in 1002.

Hedda.

Hceddi.

The Kiug"s Sister was abbess in 1U51.

Matilda 1207.

Euphemia 122t).

 

Elene de Percy 1282.

Isabella 1300.

Maud Littleton 1335.

Amitia Ladde 1340.

Constantia de Wiutreshall 1361.

Joan Cotterell 1361.

Cecilia Lavington 1375.

Alice Parys 1412.

Anne Quarley 1451.

Alice Serle 1452.

Juliauna Overy 1453.

Matilda Rowse 1494.

Avelina or Aveton Cowdrey 1518.

Anne Colta or Colle 1529.

on whose resignation Morphuet or Morphet Kingsmill was elected 1536.

 

Morphuet or Morphet Kingsmill was cousin to the last Prior of St. Swithun's and first

Dean of the Cathedral, and sister of Sir John Kingsmill, one of the Commissioners for

the Dissolution.

 

The surrender was on the 21st November, 1540. *The Abbess had a pension assigned

to her of £40 a year. Alice Gifford, the Prioress, had Jl.Q, Margery Wright, the sub-

Prioress, £5, Elizabeth Clerk, the " sexten," £4, Joan Mitchell £5, *Elizabeth Pickering

£4, Agnes Sybell, Joan Emiey, Joan Lucas, 'Mary Inkpen, Joice Harte, Alice

Harward, ^Elizabeth Perchar, Mary Erncloy, *Agnes Hardinge, Mary Willoughby,

'Agnes Holte, ^Margaret Asshe, and Elizabeth Tomlyn had each a pension assigned

them of £3 6s. 8d. ; while *Murphct Vine, *Joan Mate, *Joan Woodlock, *Elizabeth

Foster, * Elizabeth Hacker, and *Joan Dolling had £"2 13s. 4cl. per annum. These

pensions ahsoi'becl ^6123 6s. 8cl., and the account is closed with the statement " an

soo remayneth clere ^^229 12s. Ojd." Those

pensioners marked * were still in receipt of their pensions 2 and 3 Philip and Mary,

1555 - 6. The account says there were no jewels, and no ornaments " reserved to the

use of the King's M'gestie," but of plate "reserved to the same use" there was "silver

gilt 2025^ oz., silver parcel gilt 87 oz., silver white 623 oz., a total of 9122- oz."

 

The sum of all the oruameuts, goods, and cattales there fouudeu belougiuo- to the said

moiiasteiy sold 1\y the said comyssiouers as publicly appei'ith iu the l)ooks of the sale

thereof made and redy to eshowed iiij^'' xv" xxiii'' whereof in payments to the late

religious and servents despatched To vij of the late said religious of the saide late

monastery of the King's ma''""' reward viz. to iiij every of them and xl" to iiij every of

them xx^ x'.

 

To xlviij parsons being chapleynes, officers, and s'v'* of the said late monastery for

their wages and liueries xxv" iii. Of dettes owing by the seyd late m'stei-y to di'use

p'sons as well of the citie of Winchester,

as of the same town of Wherwell for money owing to them for victualles

and other necessaries bought and hadd to the use of the said late house

xvi^' xviii^ ij**, and soo x-emayneth clere xliij^ ix"". Debtes owing to the

seid late mo'stery - none. To the same by S'' John Burley Clerk p'son

of Mildeston for the costs expensis and chai'ges by the late Abbes and

convent susteyned in the s'puall laws by the wrongful vexation of the

said p'son as by decree made by Docter Cockes therein judge under the

 

bissops of Canterbury now pleynlie may appear xj".

 

Speed gives the value of the endowments at the time of the suppression as £403 12s.

lOd., Dugdale as ±'339 8s. 7d. Of the annuities and pensions mentioned above to

others than nuns, William, Marquis of Winchester, High Steward, had £Q per annum,

Richard Taylor, clerk, £4, John Cooke £1 6s. 8d., and Christouher Browne £'2. The

Commissioners were Robert Southwell, John London, John Kyngesmill, Richard

Powlett, and William Berners.

 

The mention of the " religious and servants dispatched" suggests some sad reflections,

but the accounts we have of the buildings are especially valuable iu enabling us to

form some conjecture as to their situation, because no plans or views have been yet

found, and there is therefore very little to show what the Abbey looked like.

 

 

 

Fourth Generation

 

      7. Sir John* KINGSMILL 14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22  (John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1494 in Sydmonton Court, Hampshire, England. He died on 11 Aug 1559 in Hants.

 

John* was employed23  as Admitted Tuesday before feast of All Saints on 8 Oct 1516 in Lincolns Inn. He was employed as High Sheriff of Hants in 1539/1544 in Hants.

 

John Kingsmill of Sydmonton Court, Hants, who got by perches from the crown, temp. Henry VIII, 1540,

the manor of Tichfield, Woodcote, Sandford and Sydmonton.  High Sheriff of Hants 1539-1544. Had 17

children whose names are commemorated on a bronze tablet in Kingsclere Church Sir John was

succeeded by his son. On the floor of the south chapel of St Mary, Kingsclere, is a 16th century brass

plate to Sir John Kingsmill (ob. Aug 11, 1559), who married Constance Goring, with a Latin inscription

giving an account of the large family born to a Kingsmill of Sydmonton, and on a shield are the Kingsmill

arms impaling quarterly (1) a chevron between three rings, (2) on a chief indented three molets, (3) on a

chief three roundels, (4) on a bend cotised four lions passant, (5) barry of six with a leopards head on a

quarter.

***

In the following year Henry VIII granted it with the pasture called 'Donymeade' and 'Pontesdowne' in

Sydmonton to John Kingsmill of Whitchurch, who died seised of it in 1556, leaving a son and heir William.

He bequeathed the manor for life to his wife Constance, who remained seised of it until her death in 1580,

when it passed to Sir William Kingsmill, knight.

 

***

Newbury and its parishes Ecehinswell and Sydmonton.

These two small villages formed part of the Parish of Kingsclere until 1852. The Manor of Ecchinswell,

sometimes also called the Manor of Nuthanger, formed part of the original endowment of the See of

Winchester. It remained part of the Bishopric until 1648 when, as a result of the Root and Brancti Act, it

was sold to Nicholas Love and George Wither. In 1660 it returned to the Bishop and continued to be held

until the mid eighteenth century. The lordship was soon afterwards acquired by the Herbert family.

Sydmonton manor formed part of the original endowment of the Abbey of Romsey and continued in its

possession until dissolution in 1539. The following year Henry VIII granted it to John Kingsmill of

Whitchurch. The manor remained in the hands of the Kingsmill, passing in 1766 to Elizabeth Brice. Her

husband took the name of Kingsmill by Act of Parliament but died without issue in 1805.

***

Sir John Kingsmill, no doubt the Sheriff of Hampshire, named by Fuller, in 35 Henry VIII.  He married

 

Constance, the daughter of John Goring, of Burton in Sussex (the 'Ladie Constance' in Bishop Pilkington’

s will), and by her he left several children.

***

Sir John Kingsmill of Whitchurch and Sidmanton, Knight (son of John Kingesmill of Basingstoke), died on

the 11th of August, 3 & 4 Philip and Mary.  The inquisto post mortem upon him was taken at Basingstoke

on the 24th of September following, when his eldest son was declared to be of the age of thirty years, & c. 

His will bears date 20th July, 1556.  By his wife Constance (who died 26th May, 23 Eliz.), the daughter of

John Goring of Burton, co. Sussex, he had issue nine sons, named severally: 1. William, son and heir; 2.

Richard; 3, Roger; 4, Edward; 5, Henry; 6, John; 7, George; 8, Andrew; 9, Thomas; and three daughters:

1 Alice; 2, Katherine; 3, Mary.  Of these children Richard, the second son, was of High Cleare, co.

Southampton; and was attorney of the Court of Wards to Queen Elizabeth.  He married first, Elizabeth,

sister of _ Woodruffe, Alderman of London; and secondly, Alice Fawconer, but died s.p. 1605.  Roger,

Henry and John, are noticed as dying sine prole.  George, the seventh son, who died 39 Eliz., married

Sarah, widow of Lord Hastings.  He is also mentioned as of High Cleare, and was one of the Judges of

the Common Pleas.

 

John* married Elizabeth Constance* GORING 24,25,26,27,28,29  daughter of John* GORING and Constantia* DYKE on 7 Nov 1519. They were married.

 

Elizabeth was born about 1500 in Burton Sussex England.

 

They had the following children:

 

+         11 M        i.  Sir William* KINGSMILL  was born about 1521. He died about 8 Dec 1592.

             12 F         ii.  Alice KINGSMILL 30  was born about 1522 in Hampshire, England. She died before 23 Apr 1595 in London, Middlesex, England.

 

Bishop's Marriage

 

Jacobus Pilkinton (James Pilkington) married Alice Kingsmill daughter of John

Kingsmill of  Sidmanton near Kingsclere, Hampshire. Alice Kingsmill was daughter of

John Kingsmill of the ancient family of Knights. The marriage of the Bishop was kept a

secret to keep the peace and avoid possible extreme reactions.

 

 

Alice married Bishop of Durhum James PILKINGTON 31  son of Richard PILKINGTON and Alice ASSHAW on 24 Jun 1563 in Sydmonton, Hampshire, England. James was born about 1536 in Hampshire, England. He died on 23 Jan 1575.

 

James Pilkington (1520 - 1576) was the Bishop of Durham from 1561 until his death in

1576.

 

Life

 

James was the son of Richard Pilkington of Rivington Hall, Rivington and Alice

Asshaw of Hall oth' Hill, Heath Charnock, in the parish of Bolton-le-Moors, Lancashire,

England. He entered Pembroke College, Cambridge, in 1536, but then moved to St

John's College, Cambridge, from where he graduated BA in 1539, and MA in 1542.[1]

James Pilkington was appointed Vicar of Kendal in 1545. However, he resigned this to

return to Cambridge, where he graduated Bachelor of Theology in 1551.

 

During the reign of Queen Mary I, he went abroad, staying at Zürich, Geneva, Basel,

and Frankfurt. He only returned in 1559, after an uneventful stay on the Continent.

 

On 20 July 1559, he was appointed Master of St John's, and also Regius Professor of

Divinity at Cambridge. Obviously in favour at court and at the University, he was an

 

 

active preacher in Cambridge and London; on 20 July 1560 he preached at the

memorial service for Martin Bucer and Paul Fagius at Cambridge.

 

After turning down the bishopric of Winchester over a dispute about crown alienation of

church land, he was eventually nominated Bishop of Durham, being consecrated on 2

March 1561, and enthroned on 10 April. However, he only resigned the mastership of

St John's in October of that year, where he was succeeded by his brother Leonard

Pilkington.

 

In 1560, he married Alice, daughter of Sir John Kingsmill of Sydmonton Court in

Hampshire, a leading Protestant. They had two daughters.

 

As bishop, Pilkington sought to bring the diocese back in to order, dealing with the

problems of recusancy, the conflicting power of the Earls of Westmorland and

Northumberland, in which he was helped by the new Dean, William Whittingham

(appointed 1563). Pilkington and Whittingham worked together to ensure the

appointment of numerous committed reformers in what had been an area of strong

recusant Roman Catholic feeling.

 

1565 30 January Bishop Pilkington has issued a charter of incorporation for the

citizens of Durham and Framwelgate.

 

James Pilkington founded the Rivington Church and Rivington School in 1566. The

school became Rivington and Blackrod High School in 1875. Since 1907 the school

has used the coat of arms of James Pilkington as its badge and in the coat of arms of

the school. In James Pilkingtons will dated 4th Feb. 1574 was proved at York 18th Dec.

1576. The Bishop left books to Rivington School, family and friends.

 

'The Rising of the North', 1569. The two most powerful families in northern England,

the Nevilles of Durham and Percies of Northumberland had plotted to overthrow

Queen Elizabeth I and reinstate Roman Catholicism. The City of Durham was less

strongly fortified, but was of great importance as the seat of the Bishop of Durham.

Durham and Northumberland were sprinkled with castles, held either by local nobles

(like Raby and Brancepeth) or by officers of the Queen (like Barnard Castle and Holy

Island). The rebel Earls entered Durham on 14 November, with three hundred horse, "

where they rent and trampled underfoot the English bibles and Books of Common

Prayer". They celebrated Mass in the Cathedral and elsewhere, and issued a

proclamation claiming that their intention was to restore the Catholic religion, but not to

unseat Queen Elizabeth.

 

The rising which gained huge support in the region The army was 1000 on horse and

6000 on foot. It was plotted at Brancepeth and Raby Castle but had failed. Brancepeth

and Raby have been confiscated from the Nevilles by the Crown. Sharp's book gives

only examples of the names of those appointed for execution, on p. 155. More details

exist in the Bowes MSS themselves. There were 700 listed for execution. Records do

not give accurate numbers of executions. It is likely far lower. Those who were not

executed were mostly pardoned, though a few escaped from the country or were

banished. An Act of Attainder passed in 1571 outlawed 56 of the principal rebels.

People who could not afford individual pardons were included in large numbers of "

Group pardons" issued on 25 April 1570 and listed in the Calendar of Patent Rolls.

 

James Pilkington died at Bishop Auckland, January 1576 at the age of fifty-five. A

contemporary remarked that "this wicked country ... caused Mr James Pilkington to

spend his life in continual pains and mournings and at length ended him". His body

 

 

was reburied on 24 May 1576 at the head of Bishop Beaumont's tomb in front of the

high altar of Durham Cathedral

 

 

+         13 M       iii.  Richard KINGSMILL  was born about 1523. He died on 17 Sep 1600.

             14 F        iv.  Katherine KINGSMILL  was born about 1524 in Hampshire, England.

             15 M       v.  Roger KINGSMILL  was born about 1525 in Hampshire, England.

             16 F        vi.  Margaret KINGSMILL  was born about 1526 in Hampshire, England.

Margaret married John THORNBOROUGH . John was born about 1525.

             17 M      vii.  Henry KINGSMILL  was born about 1527 in Hampshire, England.

 

+         18 F      viii.  Mary KINGSMILL  was born about 1528. She died about 1600.

             19 M       ix.  John KINGSMILL  was born about 1529 in Hampshire, England.

             20 M       x.  also possibly Edward KINGSMILL 32,33,34,35  was born about 1530 in Sidmonton,Hampshire, England. He died in 1611 in Ireland.

 

Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at

Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. V, document 211.

 

Ulster.--A brief view and survey made in several places, in the counties within named,

between 1 Dec. 1618 and 28 March 1619, by me Nichollas Pynnar, &c., by virtue of a

commission under the Great Seal of Ireland, dated 28 Nov. 1618. Herein are set forth

the names of the British undertakers, servitors, and principal natives, with their

proportions, and the undertakers of towns in the several counties of Armagh, Tyrone,

Donegall, Cavan, and Fermanagh; how they have performed their buildings and

plantations; and other matters, answerable to articles in the said commission annexed,

together with the works performed by the city of London and city and co. of

Londonderry.

 

(140.) John Leigh, 2,900 ac., in Fentonagh. A bawn of lime and stone, 2 flankers, and a

good large stone house within it, in which he dwells. Near is a village of 8 houses.

Planted with British:

Freeholders, 8.

3 of 120 apiece, 2 of 60 apiece, 2 of 45 apiece, 1 of 60.

Lessees for years 12

4 of 100 apiece, 2 of 66 apiece, 1 of 120, 3 of 60 apiece 2 of 40 apiece.

Cottagers, 21. Each a house and garden plot, and most of them 2 ac. commons. In

toto, 41 families, making 48 men, who have taken the oath.

Edward Kingsmill was the first patentee.

 

***

The Plantation of Ulster (Irish: Plandáil Uladh) was a planned process of  colonisation

which took place in the northern Irish province of Ulster during the early 17th century in

the reign of James I of England.

English and Scottish Protestants were settled on land that had been confiscated from

Catholic Irish landowners in the counties of Donegal, Coleraine1, Tyrone, Fermanagh,

Armagh, Monaghan and Cavan, following the Flight of the Earls in 1607.

 

The Plantation of Ulster was the biggest and most successful of the Plantations of

Ireland. Ulster was planted in this way to prevent further rebellion, having proved itself

over the preceding century to be the most resistant of Ireland's provinces to English

invasion.

 

 

Planning the plantation

 

Prior to its conquest in the Nine Years War of the 1590s, Ulster had been the most

Gaelic part of Ireland, a province existing largely outside English control. An early

attempt at plantation on the east coast of Ulster by Walter Devereux, 1st Earl of Essex,

in the 1570s had failed (See Plantations of Ireland).

 

The Nine Years War ended in 1603 with the surrender of the O’Neill and O’Donnell

lords to the English crown, following an extremely costly series of campaigns by the

English in which they had to counter significant Spanish aid to the Irish. But the

situation following the peace was far more propitious for colonisation schemes, and

much of the legal groundwork was laid by Sir John Davies, then attorney general of

Ireland.

 

The terms of surrender granted to the rebels in 1603 were generous, with the principal

condition that lands formerly contested by feudal right and brehon law be held under

English law. However, when Hugh O'Neill and other rebel aristocrats left Ireland in the

Flight of the Earls in 1607 to seek Spanish help for a new rebellion, Lord Deputy Arthur

Chichester seized their lands and prepared to colonise the province in a fairly modest

plantation. This would have included large grants of land to native Irish lords who had

sided with the English during the war - for example Niall Garve O'Donnell. However,

the plan was interrupted by the rebellion in 1608 of Cahir O'Doherty of Donegal, a

former ally of the English. The rebellion was put down by Wingfield, and after

O'Doherty's death his lands at Inishowen were granted out by the state, and eventually

escheated to the Crown. It was this episode that prompted Chichester to expand his

plans in an effort to expropriate the legal titles of all native landowners in the province.

 

The Plantation of Ulster was sold to James I, king of England, Scotland and Ireland, as

a joint British venture to pacify and civilise Ulster. So at least half of the settlers would

be Scots. Five counties were involved in the official plantation - Donegal, Coleraine,

Tyrone, Fermanagh and Armagh.

 

The plan for the plantation was determined by two factors. One was the wish to make

sure the settlement could not be destroyed by rebellion as the first Munster Plantation

had been. This meant that, rather than settling the Planters in isolated pockets of land

confiscated from convicted rebels, all of the land would be confiscated and then

redistributed to create concentrations of British settlers around new towns and

garrisons. What was more, the new landowners were explicitly banned from taking

Irish tenants and had to import them from England and Scotland. The remaining Irish

landowners were to be granted one quarter of the land in Ulster and the ordinary Irish

population was intended to be relocated to live near garrisons and Protestant churches.

Moreover, the Planters were also barred from selling their lands to any Irishman. They

would also have to build defences against a possible rebellion or invasion. The

settlement was to be completed within three years. In this way, it was hoped that a

defensible new community composed entirely of loyal British subjects would be

created.

 

The second major influence on the Plantation was the negotiation between various

interest groups on the British side. The principal landowners were to be Undertakers,

wealthy men from England and Scotland who undertook to import tenants from their

own estates. They were granted around 3000 acres (12 km²) each, on condition that

they settle a minimum of 48 adult males (including at least 20 families) who had to be

 

English-speaking and Protestant. However, veterans of the Nine Years War (known as

Servitors) led by Arthur Chichester successfully lobbied to be rewarded with land

grants of their own. Since these former officers did not have enough private capital to

fund the colonisation, their involvement was subsidised by the twelve great guilds, and

livery companies from the City of London were coerced into investing in the project.

The City of London guilds were also granted land on the west bank of the River Foyle

to build their own city (Londonderry, near the older Derry) and lands in County

Londonderry. The final major recipient of lands was the Protestant Church of Ireland,

which was granted all the churches and lands previously owned by the Roman

Catholic church. It was intended that clerics from England and the Pale would convert

the native population to Protestantism. There was also the plantation of Munster and

Leinster.

 

Plantation in operation

The plantation was a mixed success. At around the time the Plantation of Ulster was

planned, the Virginia Plantation at Jamestown in 1607 started. The London guilds

planning to fund the Plantation of Ulster switched and backed the London Virginia

Company instead. Many British Protestant settlers went to Virginia or New England in

the New World rather than Ulster. By the 1630s, there were 20,000 adult male British

settlers in Ulster, which meant that the total settler population could have been as high

as 80,000. They formed local majorities of the population in the Finn and Foyle valleys

(around modern Derry and east Donegal), in north Armagh and in east Tyrone.

Moreover, there had also been substantial settlement on officially unplanted lands in

south Antrim and north Down, sponsored by the Scottish landowner James Hamilton.

What was more, the settler population grew rapidly, as just under half of the planters

were women - a very high ratio compared to contemporary Spanish settlement in Latin

America or English settlement in Virginia and New England.

 

Other aspects of the original plan proved unrealistic, however. Because of political

uncertainty in Ireland and the risk of attack by the dispossessed Irish, the undertakers

had difficulty attracting settlers (especially from England). They were forced to keep

Irish tenants, destroying the original plan of segregation between settlers and natives.

As a result, the Irish population was neither removed nor Anglicised. In practice, the

settlers did not stay on bad land, but clustered around towns and the best land. This

meant that, contrary to the terms of the plantation, many British landowners had to

take Irish tenants. In 1609, Chichester had 1300 former Irish soldiers deported from

Ulster to serve in the Swedish Army, but the province remained plagued with Irish

natives, known as "wood-kerne", angered as their land was taken away from them,

who attacked settlers.

 

The attempted conversion of the Irish to Protestantism had mixed effect, if only

because the clerics imported were usually all English speakers, whereas the native

population were usually monoglot Gaelic speakers. However, ministers chosen to

serve in the plantation were required to take a course in the Irish language before

ordination, and nearly 10% of those who took up their preferments spoke it fluently2.

Of those Catholics who did convert to Protestantism, many made their choice for social

and political reasons3.

 

Wars of the Three Kingdoms and Ulster Plantation

Further information: Wars of the Three Kingdoms

In the 1640s, the Ulster Plantation was thrown into turmoil by civil wars that raged in

Ireland, England, and Scotland. The wars saw Irish rebellion against the planters,

 

twelve years of bloody war, and ultimately the re-conquest of the province by the

English parliamentary New Model Army that confirmed English and Protestant

dominance in the province.

 

After 1630, Scottish migration to Ireland waned for a decade. In the 1630s many Scots

went home after King Charles I of England forced the Prayer Book of the Church of

England on the Church of Ireland, thus compelling the Presbyterian Scots to change

their form of worship. 'The Black Oath' was imposed on the Scots in Ulster in 1638,

binding them on no account to take up arms against the King. This occurred against

the background of the Bishops Wars in Scotland - a Presbyterian uprising against King

Charles I. The King subsequently had an army, largely composed of Irish Catholics,

raised and sent to Ulster in preparation to invade Scotland. This prompted the English

and Scottish Parliaments to threaten to invade Ireland and subdue the Catholics there.

This in turn caused Gaelic Irish gentry in Ulster, led by Phelim O'Neill and Rory O'More,

to plan a rebellion aimed at taking over the administration in Ireland to pre-empt an anti-

Catholic invasion.

 

On October 23rd, 1641, the native Gaelic Ulster Catholics broke out in armed rebellion

- the Irish Rebellion of 1641. The natives mobilised in the rebellion turned on the British

Planter population, massacring about 4000 settlers and expelling about 12,000 more.

The initial leader of the rebellion, Phelim O'Neill, had actually been a beneficiary of the

Plantation land grants, but most of his supporters' families had been dispossessed and

were undoubtedly motivated by the desire to recover their ancestral lands. Many

Planter survivors rushed to the seaports and went back to Scotland or England. This

massacre and the reprisals which followed permanently soured the relationship

between Planter and native communities.

 

In the summer of 1642, ten thousand Scottish Covenanter soldiers, including some

Highlanders, arrived to quell the Irish rebellion. In revenge for the massacres of

Protestants, the Scots committed many atrocities against the Catholic population.

However, civil war in England and Scotland (the Wars of the Three Kingdoms) broke

out before the rebellion could be put down. The Scottish army fought in Ireland until

1650 in the Irish Confederate Wars, and were based in Carrickfergus. Many stayed on

in Ireland afterwards with the permission of the Cromwellian authorities. In the

northwest of Ulster, the Planters around Derry and east Donegal organised the Lagan

Army in self defence. The Protestant forces fought an inconclusive war with the Ulster

Catholics led by Owen Roe O'Neill. All sides committed atrocities against civilians in

this war, exacerbating the population displacement begun by the Plantation. In addition

to fighting the native Ulster Catholics, the British settlers fought each other in 1648-49

over the issues of the English Civil War, the Scottish Presbyterian army siding with the

King and the Lagan Army siding with the English Parliament. The New Model Army,

along with some of the British planter Protestants under Charles Coote, defeated both

the Scottish forces in Ulster and the native Ulster Catholics in 1649-50.

 

As a result, the English Parliamentarians or Cromwellians (after Oliver Cromwell) were

generally hostile to Scottish Presbyterians after they re-conquered Ireland from the

Catholic Confederates in 1649-53. The main beneficiaries of the postwar Cromwellian

Plantation in Ulster were English Protestants like Sir Charles Coote, who had taken the

Parliament's side over the King or the Scottish Covenanters in the Civil Wars. The

Wars eliminated the last major Catholic landowners in Ulster.

 

Legacy

Further information: The Troubles

 

Even four hundred years later, the Plantation of Ulster remains a controversial topic in

Ireland, because it relates directly to The Troubles in Northern Ireland. The present-

day partition of Ireland into the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland is largely as a

result of the settlement patterns of the Plantations of the 17th century. The

descendants of the British Protestant settlers largely favoured a continued link with

Britain, whereas the descendants of the native Irish Catholics mostly wanted Irish

independence. By 1922, Unionists were in the majority in four of the nine counties of

Ulster, although only two of these counties were involved in the Ulster Plantation - the

other two were the previous settlements in Antrim and Down. Consequently, following

the Anglo-Irish settlement of 1921, these four counties - and two others in which they

formed a sizeable minority - remained in the United Kingdom to form Northern Ireland.

Northern Ireland is the only part of Ireland that is still part of the United Kingdom. Irish

nationalists, most of whom are Catholic, identify with the native Irish who were

displaced in the Plantation, while Unionists, most of whom are Protestant, identify with

the planters. People with Gaelic Irish surnames are still usually Catholic, and those

with Scots Gaelic or English surnames usually Protestant. Intermarriage has occurred

across the sectarian divide: many Roman Catholics in Northern Ireland are actually

descended from the Planters (for example, Gerry Adams, John Hume), and many

Protestants from native Irish families (for example, Terence O'Neill, Ronnie Flanagan),

as evidenced by their surnames - although of course the surname only denotes one

paternal ancestor.

 

             21 F        xi.  ? KINGSMILL  was born in Hampshire, England.

             22 F       xii.  ? KINGSMILL  was born in Hampshire, England.

             23 M     xiii.  Sir George KINGSMILL 36,37,38  was born about 1532 in Hampshire, England. He died in 1606 in St Giles, Cripplegate, London, England.

 

George was employed as Justice of the Common Pleas. He was employed39  as Admission on 17 Mar 1560 in Lincolns Inn.

 

He was Judge of the common pleas

***

It was not only among the nobility and the courtiers that Donne's irresistible

attractiveness won him friends who stood by him, and were glad to enjoy his society.

Among the great lawyers who were already in the first rank of the profession, or who

were sure to attain eminence, Donne had early been recognised as a young man of

supreme ability, and as likely to make a great reputation. Among these were Sir

George Kingsmill, after whom, I conjecture, that Donne's second son George was

named. He had married Lady Bedford's cousin, the mother of Henry, Earl of

Huntingdon. Sir George, who was a Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, died in 1606,

 

 

George married Lady Hastings Sarah HARRINGTON 40  daughter of Sir James HARRINGTON. Sarah was born about 1566. She died in Sep 1629.

             24 M     xiv.  Arthur KINGSMILL  was born about 1535 in Hampshire, England.

 

+         25 F       xv.  Jane KINGSMILL  was born about 1537. She died in 1599.

             26 M     xvi.  Andrew KINGSMILL 41  was born in 1538 in Hampshire, England. He died in Sep 1569 in Lausanne.

 

ANDREW KINGSMILL, LL.B. ‘ This excellent person was born at Sidmonton in

Hampshire in the year 1538, educated at Corpus Christi college, Oxford, and elected

 

Fellow of All Souls college in the same university, in 1558. He studied the civil law, in

the knowledge of which he made considerable proficiency. But while he was thus

employed, he did not forget to seek first the Kingdom of God and his righteousness. He

discovered the warmest desires for a knowledge of the mysteries of the gospel, and for

his attainment of which, he paid the closest application. He would receive nothing for

truth, till he found the testimony of scripture for its support. By a constant and close

attention to the word of God, it’s sacred passages became familiar to him. And indeed,

he so addicted himself to search and recite the holy scriptures, that he could readily

repeat by heart, and in the Greek language, the whole of the epistles to the Romans

and Galatians, the first epistle of John, and many other parts of the sacred volume.__Mr

Kingsmill did not so much esteem the preferment and profit, to which he might easily

have attained by the profession of the law, as the comfortable assurance and blessed

hope of eternal life, and to be useful in preaching the gospel to his fellow creatures. He

therefore, relinquished the law, entered the sacred function, and became an admired

preacher in the University of Oxford. For some time after the accession of Queen

Elizabeth, there were only three preachers in this university, Dr. Humphrey, Dr.

Sampson, and Mr. Kingsmill, all Puritans. But upon the rigorous imposition of

conformity, Dr. Sampson being already deprived of his deanery, Mr. Kingsmill withdrew

from the storm. He was averse to all severity in the imposition of habits and

ceremonies; and being fixed in his non-conformity, he wrote a long letter to Archbishop

Parker, against urging a conformity to the papists in habits, ceremonies, and other

things superstitious.__Upon Mr Kingsmill’s departure from the Kingdom, he resolved to

take up abode amongst the best reformed churches, both for doctrine and discipline,

that he could meet with in a foreign land. During the first three years, he settled at

Geneva, where he was highly esteemed by persons eminent for learning and piety.

Afterwards, he removed to Lausanne, where he died in the month of September, 1569,

aged thrity-one years. Though he was a zealous puritan, and an avowed non-

conformist, seeing he was a man of such great worth, and universally beloved, Wood

found himself obliged to give him an excellent character. Accordingly, he says he was

too good for this world, and left behind him a most excellent pattern of piety, devotion,

and every other amiable virtue.__HIS WORKS. ‘ 1. A View of Man’s Estate, wherein the

great Mercy of God in Man’s free Justification is shewed ‘ 1574. ‘ 2. An excellent and

comfortable Treatise for all such as are in any manner of way wither troubled in Mind,

or afflicted in Body, 1578. ‘ 3. Godly advice touching Marriage, 1580. ‘ 4. A godly and

learned Exhortation to bear patiently with all Afflictions of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. ‘

5. A Conference between a godly learned Christian and an afflicted Conscience,

concerning a conflict had with Satan. ‘ 6. A sermon on John iii. 16.

 

             27 M    xvii.  Thomas KINGSMILL  was born about 1539 in Hampshire, England.

 

      8. Alice KINGSMILL  (John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1497.

Alice married Thomas BULLOCK 42,43  son of Gilbert BULLOCK and Margaret NORRIS. Thomas was born about 1482. He died about 1588.

 

The Kingsmill family appears frequently in records of Barkham. John Kingsmill (de Kyngesmalle) was

resident in the parish in 1327, and the names of John Kingsmill and Adam his son and Elizabeth wife of

Adam occur in 1337.  Thomas Kingsmill and Richard his brother, living in 1476, are called sons of William

Kingsmill of Barkham, deceased.  Richard Kingsmill of Barkham was father of John Kingsmill, justice of

the Common Pleas, who died in 1504 and whose daughter Alice married Thomas Bullock of Arborfield.

His son Sir John Kingsmill was of Sydmonton, Hants, and was the ancestor of Elizabeth Brice (see

 

manor), whose husband Robert Brice took the name and arms of Kingsmill in 1766 and was created a

baronet in 1800.

 

 

Thomas and Alice had the following children:

 

+         28 F          i.  Margaret BULLOCK .

 

 

Fifth Generation

 

    11. Sir William* KINGSMILL 44,45,46,47  (John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1521 in Hampshire, England. He died about 8 Dec 1592 in England. He was buried on 11 Dec 1592 in Hampshire, England.

 

William* was employed48  as Special admission on 3 May 1544 in Lincolns Inn.

William* married Bridget* RALEIGH 49,50  daughter of Sir George* RALEIGH and Jane* CONINGSBY about 1530 in Hampshire, England. Bridget* was born in 1533 in Thornburgh Warwick, England. She died on 12 Aug 1607.

 

They had the following children:

 

+         29 M        i.  Rev, MA Anthony* KINGSMILL  was born about 1550. He died on 3 Oct 1616.

 

+         30 M        ii.  Sir William KINGSMILL  was born about 1557. He died about 1620.

 

+         31 F        iii.  Bridget KINGSMILL  was born about 1560.

             32 F        iv.  Constance KINGSMILL  was born51  about 1561 in Sidmanton, Hampshire, England. She died52  about 1589.

Constance married 7th Baron Saye & Sele Richard FIENNES  son of Richard FIENNES and Ursula FERMOR. Richard was born about 1550. He died in 1613.

 

+         33 M       v.  Sir Francis KINGSMILL  was born about 1570. He died on 25 Jul 1620.

             34 F        vi.  Katherine KINGSMILL  was born about 1574. She was christened53  on 25 Jul 1574 in Sidmanton, Hampshire, England.

Katherine married55  Sir Anthony PALMER 54  on 11 Mar 1593 in Sidmanton, Hampshire, England. Anthony was born56  about 1571 in Hampshire, England.

             35 M      vii.  poss, snr. Augustine KINGSMILL 57,58 .

 

Augustine was employed59  as Rector in Mogeessha, Co. Cork, Ireland. He was employed60  as Rector & Vicar on 15 Apr 1637 in Dingindonovan, Clonmult & Ballyspillane.

Augustine married62  Margaret STEEDE 61  on 4 Jan 1610 in Milton Regis, Kent, England.

 

I think the accepted view is that the ruins were those of the unfinished mansion started

by Sir James Cromer (obiit 27th March 1613/4 - see monument at Tunstall church).  He

was the last of the Tunstall Cromers.  His widow married Sir Edward Hales and

brought Tunstall into the hands of that family.

 

 

The mansion building scheme having been abandoned after Sir James's death, I

suppose that the ruins were used as a barn by an opportunist tenant-farmer.  

 

 Sir James's grandson (Rev. Crowmer Steed of Steed Hill, Harrietsham) became

incumbent at Murston in 1630/1

 

 

    13. Richard KINGSMILL 63,64,65,66  (John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1523 in Hampshire, England. He died on 17 Sep 1600.

 

Richard was employed67  as Surveyor of the Court of Wards. He was employed as  Sir.

 

Richard, the second son, was of High Cleare, co. Southampton; and was attorney of the Court of Wards

to Queen Elizabeth.  He married first, Elizabeth, sister of _ Woodruffe, Alderman of London; and

secondly, Alice Fawconer, but died s.p. 1605.

***

 Village of Burghclere

The prehistoric occupation of Burghelere is indicated by several flint implements and other archaelogical

remains that have been found. The documented history of Burgclere includes several very early grants of

land at Clere to the church in Winchester. The Doomsday Survey mentions a church at Burgclere, and

lands at Clere (possibly Burghclere combined with Highclere) are described as being held by the Bishop

for the monks at Winchester. The now deserted mediaeval village of Old Burgclere can only 'be seen as

irregularities in the ground as most traces have been destroyed by ploughing. The village had its own

church, and the manor house was a good example of an early Fourteenth century aisled hall building.

The mediaeval Hospital of St. Cross is tbougbt to have stood on the main Wincheqter to Oxford road,

although the exact site is not known. The twelfth century church of All Saints at Old Burghclere was

restored in 1861 but has kept many twelfths and thirteen-century features. The manor of Burghclere

remained in possession of the See of Winchester until 1551, when Edward IV received it in exchange for

other lands It was granted to William FitzWilliam and remained in tbis family until acquired by Richard

Kingsmill in 1577, after which it passed by descent to the Lucys. In 1671 the manor was conveyed to Sir

Robert Sawyer and thereafter descended through his daughter to the Earl of Pembroke Burgbciere was

a quiet village admired by Dean Field, Chaplain to Elizabeth I and rector here at the end of his life. It now

has a twentieth century shrine, the Oratory of All Souls, also known as the Sandham Memorial Chapel

containing Frescoes of First World War scenes by Sir Sidney Spencer it Commemorates a young officer

who died in 1919 from an illness contracted in Macedonia during the 1914-18 war.

 

Richard married (1) Alice FAUCONER 68  daughter of Richard FAUCONER and Elinor PEMBRIDGE. Alice was born about 1520.

 

They had the following children:

 

+         36 F          i.  Constance KINGSMILL  was born about 1566.

 

Richard married (2) Elizabeth WOODROFFE . Elizabeth was born about 1535.

 

    18. Mary KINGSMILL 69,70  (John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1528 in Hampshire, England. She died about 1600.

Mary married Sir Edward GODDARD 71,72  son of James GODDARD. Edward died about 1610.

 

They had the following children:

 

+         37 F          i.  Bridgett GODDARD .

 

    25. Jane KINGSMILL 73  (John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born74,75  about 1537 in Sydmonton, Hampshire, England. She died76  in 1599.

Jane married79,80  Richard COOPER 77,78  about 1557 in Rudgwick, Sussex, England. Richard was born81  before 8 Jan 1538 in Stedham, Sussex, England. He died on 8 May 1566 in Manor Paulett,Southhampton,Suffolk,England.

 

They had the following children:

 

+         38 M        i.  John COOPER  was born in Dec 1558. He died in 1610.

 

    28. Margaret BULLOCK 82  (Alice KINGSMILL, John*, Richard *, Richard*).

Margaret married John II MALTHOUSE 83 . John was born about 1532 in Berkshire.

 

They had the following children:

 

+         39 F          i.  Margaret M MALTHOUSE .

 

 

Sixth Generation

 

    29. Rev, MA Anthony* KINGSMILL 84,85,86,87,88,89,90  (William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born91,92,93  about 1550 in England. He died94,95,96,97,98,99  on 3 Oct 1616 in Milton, near Sittingbourne,Kent.

 

Anthony* graduated100  Matriculated from Queens College, Cambridge University in 1568 in Cambridge University. He graduated101  B.A. in 1573/1574 in Queens College, Cambridge University. He graduated102  M.A. in 1577 in Magdalen College, Cambridge University. He was ordained103  Presented by the Dean and Chapter of Canterbury in 1579. He was employed104,105  as Vicar in 1579/1585 in Monkton and Birchington, Kent. He was employed106,107  as Vicar in 1585/1616 in Milton by Sittingbourne, Kent.

 

Of the family of Sidmanton, in Hampshire, in which no less than four brothers matriculated at the

University of Oxford on one day in 1553, and of whom (though their Christian names be not given) one is

believed to have been Andrew, a “learned and pious person” says Wood; a second, John, Demy of

Magdalen College, then aged sixteen, and Fellow three years later, in 1556; and a third, Thomas, who

running the same course, was a Fellow of Magdalen in 1560, later Public Orator of the University, and

Professor of Hebrew therein.

 

Rev. Anthony Kingsmill was rector of Monkton, Isle of Thanet, from 1579 to 1585; vicar of Milton, near

Sittingbourne, from 1584 to 1616, where he died and where he was buried.  He was presented with that

living by the Dean and Chapter of Canterbury.

 

Cambridge University Alumni:

Matric. Pens. From QUEENS’, Easter 1568; B.A. 1573-4; M.A. from Magdalene, 1577.  V. of Monkton

and Birchington, Kent, 1579-85.  V. of Milton by Sittingbourne, 1585-1616.  Died 1616.

 

‘ Elizabeth Hodilow, who, before 1585, was married to the Rev. Anthony Kingsmill, A.M. Vicar of Milton

next Sittingbourne, in Kent, who was presented to that living, 8th Sept. 1585, by the Dean and Chapter of

Canterbury, and which he held till his death in 1616.  This gentleman was no doubt descended from a

common ancestor with the ancient house of Kingsmill in the adjoining county of Hants, who were created

Baronets in 1800, and bore for arms, “Argent, crusily fitchée sable, a chevron ermine between three fers

de Moline sable, a chief ermines.”  The above marriage produced, with four younger children, baptized at

 

Milton between 1589 and 1604, a son, Anthony Kingsmill, who as a legacy in the will of his uncle Joseph

Hodilow 1585.

***

[From Clergy of the Church of England Database]:

Year    Type       Name as Recorded Location Office/Status

1579    Appt(Induction Mandate)      Kingsmill, Anthony Monkton / Vicar

1579    Appt(Institution)   Kingesmill, Anthgonius Munckton in Insula Thanet / Perpetual Vicar

1583    Appt(Licensing)     Kingsmill, Anthonius Diocese of Canterbury / Preacher

1585    Vac(resignation)      Kingsmyll, Anthony Monkton with chapels /Vicar

1585    Vac(resignation)      Kingsmill, Anthony Mouncton cum capella, Isle of Thanet / Perpetual

Vicar 1585          Appt(Institution)   Kingsmill, Anthony Mylton alias Mydleton juxta Sittingborne /

Perpetual Vicar  1592         Libc Kingsmill, Anthonius      Milton /   Vicar

1596    Libc Kinge, Anthonius Milton /Vicar

1600    Appt(Licensing)     Kingsmill, Anthony Thurnham / Curate

1603    Libc Kingsmil, Anthonius Milton /        Vicar

1603    Libc Kingsnell, Anthonius      Thorneham / Curate

1604    Appt(Licensing)     Kingesmill, Anthony Tonge / Curate

1604    Appt(Institution)   Kingsmyll, Anthonius Tong / Perpetual Vicar

1607    Libc Kingsmill, Anthonius      Tonge /    Curate

1607    Libc Kingsmell, Anthonius Milton /       Vicar

1612    Libc Kingesmill, Anthonius Milton alias Midleton / Vicar

1616    Vac(Death) Kingsmell, Anthony Milton juxta Sittingbourne / Perpetual Vicar

 

Anthony* married109  Elizabeth* HODILOW 108  daughter of Thomas* HODILOW and Mary before 1574. Elizabeth* was born110  before 1570 in Cambridgeshire England.

 

? Elizabeth Hodilow, who, before 1585, was married to the Rev. Anthony Kingsmill, A.M. Vicar of Milton

next Sittingbourne, in Kent, who was presented to that living, 8th Sept. 1585, by the Dean and Chapter of

Canterbury, and which he held till his death in 1616.  This gentleman was no doubt descended from a

common ancestor with the ancient house of Kingsmill in the adjoining county of Hants, who were created

Baronets in 1800, and bore for arms, “Argent, crusily fitchée sable, a chevron ermine between three fers

de Moline sable, a chief ermines.”  The above marriage produced, with four younger children, baptized at

Milton between 1589 and 1604, a son, Anthony Kingsmill, who as a legacy in the will of his uncle Joseph

Hodilow 1585.

 

 

Anthony* and Elizabeth* had the following children:

 

+         40 M        i.  Rev, MA Anthony* KINGSMILL  was born about 1576.

             41 M        ii.  Rev, MA Quod-deus-vult KINGSMILL 111,112  was born about 1585.

 

Quod-deus-vult graduated113  MA on 30 Aug 1615 in Kings College, Cambridge. He was employed114  as Curate on 30 Aug 1615 in Great Chart, Kent, England. He was ordained115   on 27 Oct 1615 in Overall, John/Coventry & Lichfield 1614-1618. He was employed116  as yu on 24 Oct 1618 in Throwley and Sheldwich parish schools, Kent, England.

             42 M       iii.  Rev Augustine KINGSMILL 117,118,119,120,121,122,123  was born124,125  about 1585 in Milton by Sittingbourne, Kent, England. He was christened126  on 2 Sep 1604 in Milton, near Sittingbourne, in Kent England. He died127  about 1669 in Cloyne, Cork, Ireland.

 

Augustine was employed128  as Teaching/Medical Licence in 1596 in Horton, Kent, England. He graduated129  Matric. Pens. in 1603 in Kings College,

 

Cambridge. He was employed130  as Appointment of Augustine Kingsmill as notary on 16 Feb 1620 in Canterbury Cathedral. He was employed131  as Vicar on 22 Jan 1633 in Rostillane.

 

Took both Deacon and Priest's orders in 1633; succeeding his father in the vicarages

of Mogeely and Rostillan in the same year.

 

Elizabeth, as his “sister Elizabeth Kingsmill”, the relict probably of the Rev. Augustine

Kingsmill, rector of Mogeely, Rostillan, &c., in Cork, and of Barry’s Court in the same

county, and for whom Elizabeth his relict, took out letters of administration in the

Perogative Court of Dublin the same year, 1669.  This Augustine born, or at least

baptized, at Milton, near Sittingbourne, in Kent, on 2nd September, 1604, was the son

of Rev. Anthony Kingsmill, a dignitary in the Church of Ireland, and who was the first of

his family that settled there, and one, it is presumed, of the family of Sidmanton, in

Hampshire, in which no less than four brothers matriculated at the University of Oxford

on one day in 1553, and of whom (though their Christian names be not given) one is

believed to have been Andrew, a “learned and pious person” says Wood; a second,

John, Demy of Magdalen College, then aged sixteen, and Fellow three years later, in

1556; and a third, Thomas, who running the same course, was a Fellow of Magdalen in

1560, later Public Orator of the University, and Professor of Hebrew therein.

 

On 25th January 1642, Augustine Kingsmill, of Barry’scourt, in the parish of

Carrigtwohill, Clerk, deposes on oath that he was robbed and forcibly despoiled, on or

about the 25th December, 1641, or thereabouts, of his goods and chattels, &c., worth

£600, partly consisting of “debts due from these rebells following”…besides the loss of

the benefits of his church living, worth, communibusannis, £200.

 

He died intestate.  Administration of the will of Rev. Augustine Kingsmell, of Ballytubber

-oughte (Ballyoughtra?) county Cork, was granted on 16th June, 1669, to Henry

Kingsmell, his “nephos.”  He is stated in the memoir of the B yam family to have

married Elizabeth, dau. of Rev. E. Byam, Precentor of Cloyne, q.v.; and the author of

that memoir states that letters of administration were granted in 1669 to Elizabeth, the

relict of Reverend Augustine Kingsmill.

 

In his titles to Dingindonovan, he is styled Rev. Augustine Kingsmill, senior.  Perhaps

there were two clergymen of this name. (note: Rev Augustine Kingsmill  -

Schoolmaster at Monks Horton parish school in 1596, followed by Rev William

Kingsmill in 1605 - per Clergy of the Church of England Database)

 

Thsese Kingsmills were kin of William Kingsmill, of Ballyowen, county Cork, who, by

his wife Ursula (dau. of Sir Warham St Leger, and sister of Sir William St. Leger), had

two sons, John, who died Sp; and William, who had a daughter Mary, wife of Ulysses

Burgh, Bp. of Ardagh.

 

The first-mentioned William Kingsmill is thus noticed by Smith in his history of Cork.

 

“The first act of hostility committed in Munster was on the 20th of November., 1641,

when the rabble plundered Mr. William Kingsmill, of Ballyowen, brother-in-law to the

Lord President St. Leger, who, with some forces, soon revenged the loss.”

 

 

Augustine married133  (1) Margaret STEEDE 132  on 4 Jan 1610 in Milton Regis, Kent, England.

Augustine married (2) Elizabeth BYAM  daughter of Rev. E BYAM.

             43 M       iv.  Rev, MA Thomas KINGSMILL 134,135  was born about 1590.

 

Thomas graduated136  BA in 1610 in Kings College, Cambridge. He was employed137  as Curate of Ickham in 1616 in Ickham, Kent. He graduated138  MA in 1619 in Kings College, Cambridge. He was employed139  as Vicar of Lymne in 1620/1637 in Lymne, Kent, England. He was employed140  as Admon in 1640 in Canterbury. He was employed141  as Curate of Hythe in 1640 in Hythe, Kent.

 

    30. Sir William KINGSMILL 142,143  (William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1557 in Sydmonton, Hampshire, England. He died144  about 1620 in Sydmonton, Hampshire, England.

 

On the death of Sir William in 1592 (the estate) passed to his son and heir William, who, dying in 1619, 

was succeeded by his second but first surviving son Henry.  The latter died five years later, leaving a son

and heir William Kingsmill,  who suffered much during the civil wars. __He was really on the Parliamentary

side and only acted for the king under  compulsion, being forced in 1642 by the king's summons to go to

Reading, where he was made sheriff, 'an office which he took in the honest sense of serving his country

for which it was first ordained.' (fn. 145) __In April 1645 he petitioned the Committee for Compounding to

settle him in his estate in Hampshire, alleging that he had been thrice plundered by express order from

the king, by whom he had been sequestered for the last twelve months, that he had lost £400 in horses

and cattle by Lord Manchester and Sir William Waller when lying at Newbury, and that owing to the

position of his house between the two parties in the middle of the western road he had been obliged to

entertain all comers. He was at length permitted to compound for his estate in May 1651 by payment of a

fine of £750.__He died in 1661, leaving a son and heir, Sir William Kingsmill, on whose death in 1698 the

manor of Sydmonton passed to his eldest son, William Kingsmill, who died unmarried in 1766. __This

estate then passed to his niece Elizabeth the daughter of his sister Frances Cory, who married Captain

Robert Brice, afterwards Admiral of the Blue. (fn. 148) Robert took the name of Kingsmill by Act of

Parliament in 1766, was created a baronet on 24 November 1800, and died without issue in 1805. (fn.

149) He left Sydmonton to the Rev. John Stephens, vicar of Chewton Mendip (co. Somers.), (fn. 150)

who assumed the surname and arms of Kingsmill by royal licence in 1806. (fn. 151) He died in 1814,

leaving an eldest surviving son, William Kingsmill, who married Anne Jane daughter of William Howley,

Archbishop of Canterbury, (fn. 152) and died in 1865, leaving issue William Howley Kingsmill, whose son

and heir, Mr. Andrew de Portal Kingsmill, is the present lord of the manor.

 

William married146  Ann WILKES 145  daughter of William WILKES about 1557 in Hodnell, Warwick, England. Ann was born about 1553 in Hodnell, Warwickshire, England. She was christened on 17 Mar 1553 in Kingsbury, Warwick, England. She died in Sydmanton,Buckinghamshire, England.

 

They had the following children:

             44 M        i.  William KINGSMILL  was born about Dec 1577/1578 in Sydmonton, Hampshire, England.

             45 F         ii.  Elizabeth KINGSMILL  was born about 1581 in Sydmonton, Hampshire, England. She died on 1 Sep 1621 in Thornton Hall, Bucks, England.

Elizabeth married Sir (1st Baronet of Thorton) Edward TYRELL  about 1606 in ?Buckinghamshire, England. Edward was born about 1579 in Thornton Hall, Buckinghamshire, England.

 

+         46 F        iii.  Eleanor KINGSMILL  was born about 1583.

 

+         47 M       iv.  Sir Henry KINGSMILL  was born about 1587. He died on 26 Oct 1624.

 

+         48 M       v.  Richard KINGSMILL  was born about 1588/1589.

 

             49 M       vi.  George KINGSMILL  was born about 1590 in Sydmonton, Hampshire, England.

             50 M      vii.  Walter KINGSMILL  was born about 1591/1592 in Sydmonton, Hampshire, England.

             51 M     viii.  Joshua KINGSMILL  was born about 1593 in Sydmonton, Hampshire, England.

             52 F        ix.  Bridget KINGSMILL  was born about 1594 in Sydmonton, Hampshire, England.

             53 F         x.  Anna KINGSMILL  was born about 1595 in Sydmonton, Hampshire, England.

             54 F        xi.  Constance KINGSMILL  was born about 1596/1597 in Sydmonton, Hampshire, England.

             55 F       xii.  Margaret KINGSMILL  was born about 1598 in Sydmonton, Hampshire, England.

             56 F      xiii.  Frances KINGSMILL  was born about 1600 in Sydmonton, Hampshire, England.

             57 F      xiv.  Martha KINGSMILL  was born about 1602 in Sydmonton, Hampshire, England.

             58 F       xv.  Judith KINGSMILL  was born about 1604 in Sydmonton, Hampshire, England.

 

    31. Bridget KINGSMILL 147  (William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born148  about 1560 in Sidmanton, Hampshire, England.

Bridget married151  Thomas NORREYS 149,150  about 1581 in Bray, Berkshire, England. Thomas died152  on 20 Aug 1599.

 

They had the following children:

             59 F          i.  Elizabeth NORREYS  was born about 1595. She died about 1625.

Elizabeth married John JEPHSON  son of William JEPHSON and Mary DANNETT in Jun 1607 in Cork, Ireland. John died on 6 May 1638.

 

    33. Sir Francis KINGSMILL 153,154  (William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born155  about 1570 in Kingsclere, Hampshire, England. He was christened156  on 6 Jan 1570 in Kingsclere, Hampshire, England. He died on 25 Jul 1620 in Ballybeg Abbey, co Cork. He was buried in 1620 in St. Marys Church, Bridgewater, Somerset, England.

 

 He served in Ireland under Sir G. Carew 1601 - 2. Acquired lands at Ballybeg Abbey, Co. Cork.  Made a

Knight Bachelor 9th March 1604 at Reban, Dublin, by Sir George Carey, Lord Deputy of Ireland.

 

Francis married Dorothy HUNT  daughter of Henry HUNT and Jane DE VERE about 1605. Dorothy was christened on 14 Feb 1584 in Gosfield Church, Nr. Braintree, Essex.

 

They had the following children:

 

+         60 M        i.  Col. Sir William KINGSMILL  was born in 1596. He died in 1650.

 

+         61 F         ii.  Dorothea KINGSMILL  was born before 1612.

 

    36. Constance KINGSMILL 157,158  (Richard, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1566 in High Clere, Hampshire, England.

Constance married161  Sir Thomas LUCY  ""of Charlecotte""159,160  about 1586 in Charleton, , Warwick, England. Thomas was born in 1551 in Charleton, Warwickshire, England. He died about 1605.

 

They had the following children:

 

+         62 F          i.  Elizabeth LUCY  was born about 1587.

             63 M        ii.  Right Reverend William LUCY 162 .

 

+         64 M       iii.  Baronet Richard LUCY  died about 1667.

 

    37. Bridgett GODDARD 163,164  (Mary KINGSMILL, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*).

Bridgett married166  Willliam CORDRAY 165  son of Thomas III CORDRAY and Jane COXWELL about 1600. Willliam was born about 1585 in Enlgand. He died before 4 Nov 1621 in Chute, Hampshire, England.

 

They had the following children:

             65 F          i.  Bridgett CORDRAY 167  was born about 1604 in Chute, Hampshire, England. She died about 1650 in Dennington, Suffolk, England.

Bridgett married Samuel IRONMONGER 168  on 23 Jul 1628 in Salisbury, England.

 

+         66 F         ii.  Anne CORDRAY  was born about 1609. She died in 1671.

 

    38. John COOPER  (Jane KINGSMILL, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born in Dec 1558 in Stanton,Drew,Somerset,England. He died in 1610 in Whitchurch,Hants,,England.

John married Martha SKUTT  daughter of Anthony SKUTT. Martha was born about 1550 in Stanton,Drew,Somerset,England. She died in 1610 in England.

 

They had the following children:

 

+         67 M        i.  John COOPER  was born about 1598. He died on 23 Mar 1631.

 

    39. Margaret M MALTHOUSE 169  (Margaret BULLOCK, Alice KINGSMILL, John*, Richard *, Richard*).

Margaret married William MONTAGUE 170 . William was born about 1536. He died about 1594.

 

They had the following children:

 

+         68 M        i.  Peter MONTAGUE  was born about 1573. He died about 1638.

 

 

Seventh Generation

 

    40. Rev, MA Anthony* KINGSMILL 171,172,173,174,175,176,177,178,179,180,181  (Anthony*, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born182,183,184,185  about 1576 in Milton, Kent, England. He

was christened186  about 1633 in Milton, Kent. He died187  in Cloyne, Cork, Ireland.

 

Anthony* signed a will in 1585 in Granted a legacy in the will of his uncle Joseph Hodilow 15. He graduated188  Matric. Sizar in 1596 in Trinity College, Cambridge. He graduated189,190  BA in 1598 in Canterbury. He was ordained191,192  Deacon on 22 Jul 1599 in Collated to the Prepend of Cahirultan. He was ordained193,194  Priest on 4 Nov 1599 in Peterb.. He graduated195  M.A. in 1602 in Corpus Christie College, Cambridge. He was employed196  as Vicar in 1603 in Tongue, Kent, England. He was employed197  as Rector in 1615/1633 in Mogeesha and Rostellan. He was employed198  as Curate in 1615 in Doneraile, Buttevant, and Cahirdugga. He was employed199  as Vicar on 1 Sep 1615 in Bregoge. He was employed200  as Priest in 1633/1640 in Cahirultan. He was employed201  as Resigned in favour of Augustine Kingsmill in 1633 in Mogeesha and Rostellan. He was employed202  as Appointed Rector in 1639/1640 in Mallow. He was employed203  as Vicar on 8 Apr 1640 in Derryvillan.

 

Possibly the eldest child, being the legatee of his uncle Hodilow's will.

 

***

 

Rev. Anthony Kingsmill, a dignitary in the Church of Ireland, and who was the first of his family that

settled there, THE REV. ANTHONY KINGSMILL and SIR FRANCIS KINGSMILL (apparently cousins)

were among the Elizabethan settlers in County Cork.

 

Anthony Kingsmill was born in 1574, and was a B.A. in Cambridge in 1598. Of Trinity College,

Cambridge; took Priest's orders in 1599, vicar of Tongue, Kent, 1603; emigrated to Ireland; vicar of

Bregoige, Rostillan and Mogeely, and Prependary of Cloyne, 1633. and made Rector of Mallow in Cork

in 1640.  He was the son of Rev. Antony Kingsmill of Milton in Kent.  Both father and son were eminent in

their day.  Mallow then belonged to Sir John Jephson.

 

***

 

Thsese Kingsmills were kin of William Kingsmill, of Ballyowen, county Cork, who was grandson and

grandson-in-law of Sir William Kingsmill, and who, by his wife Ursula (dau. of Sir Warham St Leger, and

sister of Sir William St. Leger), had two sons, John, who died Sp; and William, who had a daughter Mary,

wife of Ulysses Burgh, Bp. of Ardagh.  The first-mentioned William Kingsmill is thus noticed by Smith in

his history of Cork: 'The first act of hostility committed in Munster was on the 20th of November., 1641,

when the rabble plundered Mr. William Kingsmill, of Ballyowen, brother-in-law to the Lord President St.

Leger, who, with some forces, soon revenged the loss.'

 

***

 

Cambridge University Alumni:

Anthony Kingsmill (jnr)

Matric, sizar from TRINITY, c. 1596; B.A. 1598-9; M.A. from Corpus Christi, 1602.  Ord of deacon

(Peterb.) July 25; priest, Nov. 4 1599.

 

Granted a legacy in the will of his uncle Joseph Hodilow 1585.

 

 

Anthony* had the following children:

 

+         69 M        i.  Lieut. Henry* KINGSMILL  was born before 1648.

             70 M        ii.  Rev. William KINGSMILL .

 

    46. Eleanor KINGSMILL  (William, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1583 in Sydmonton, Hampshire, England.

Eleanor married Timothy TYRELL . Timothy was born after 1579. He died in 1632.

 

They had the following children:

 

+         71 F          i.  Eleanor TYRELL  died in 1672.

 

    47. Sir Henry KINGSMILL 204,205  (William, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1587 in Sydmonton, Hampshire, England. He died206  on 26 Oct 1624.

 

On the death of Sir William in 1592 (the estate) passed to his son and heir William, who, dying in 1619, 

was succeeded by his second but first surviving son Henry.  The latter died five years later, leaving a son

and heir William Kingsmill.

 

***

 

Full text of "The life and letters of John Donne, dean of St. Paul's. Now for the first time rev. and

collected" <http://www.archive.org/stream/lifeandlettersof02gossuoft/lifeandlettersof02gossuoft_djvu.txt>

 

The Lady Kingsmell, to whom the next letter was addressed, had been the Bridget White to whom, in

earlier years, Donne had gaily written some notes which have been published already in their place. Her

husband, Sir Henry Kingsmell, died on the very day on which Donne indited this elaborate letter of

consolation to the widow.

 

" 'To the Honourable Lady the Lady KINGSMELL upon

the death of her husband}" Vf

 

" MADAME, Those things which God dissolves at once, as He shall do the sun and moon and those

bodies at the last conflagration, He never intends to reunite again ; but in those things which He takes in

pieces, as He does man and wife in these divorces by death, and in single persons by the divorce of

body and soul, God hath another purpose to make them up again. That piece which He takes to Himself

is presently cast in a mould, and in an instant made fit for His use ; for heaven is not a place of a

proficiency, but of present perfection. That piece which He leaves behind in this world, by the death of a

part thereof, grows fitter and fitter for Him by the good use of His corrections and the entire conformity to

His will.

 

" Nothing disproportions us, nor make us so uncapable of being reunited to those whom we loved here,

as murmuring or not advancing the goodness of Him who hath removed them from hence. We would

wonder to see a man who, in a wood, were left to his liberty to fell what trees he would, take only the

crooked and leave the straightest trees; but that man hath perchance a ship to build and not a house,

and so hath use of that kind of timber ; let not us who know that in God's house there are many mansions,

but yet have no model, no design of the form of that building, wonder at His taking in of His materials,

why He takes the young and leaves the old, or why the sickly overlive those that had better health. We

are not bound to think that souls departed have divested all affections towards them whom they left here ;

but we are bound to think that for all their loves they would not be here again. Then is the will of God

done in earth, as it is in heaven, when we neither pretermit His actions nor

resist them, neither pass them over in an inconsideration as though God had no hand in them, nor go

about to take them out of His hands as though we could direct Him to do them better.

 

"As God's Scriptures are His will, so His actions are His will ; both are testaments, because they testify

His mind to us. It is not lawful to add a schedule to either of His wills, as they do ill who add to His written

will, the Scriptures, a schedule of Apocryphal books ; so do they also, who to His other will, His

manifested actions, add Apocryphal conditions and a schedule of such limitations as these, ' if God

would have stayed thus long,' or 'if God would have proceeded in this or this manner I could have borne

it.' To say that our afflictions are greater than we can bear is so near to despairing as that the same

 

words express both ; for when we consider Cain's

words in that original tongue in which God spake, we cannot tell whether the words be, My punishment is

greater than can be born, or, My sin is greater than can be forgiven.

 

"But, Madame, you who willingly sacrificed your self to God in your obedience to Him in your own

sickness cannot be doubted to dispute with Him about any part of you which He shall be pleased to

require at your hands. The difference is great in the loss of an arm or a head, of a child or a husband ; but

to them who are in corporated into Christ, their head, there can be no beheading ; upon you, who are a

member of the spouse of Christ, the Church, there can fall no widowhood, nor orphanage upon those

children to whom God is father. I have not another office by your husband's death, for I was your

chaplain before in my daily prayers, but I shall enlarge that office with other collects than before, that God

will continue to you that peace which you have ever had in Him, and send you quiet and peaceable

dispositions in all them with whom you shall have anything to do in your temporal estate and matters of

this world, Amen. Your Ladyship's very humble and thankful servant in Christ Jesus,

 

"J. DONNE.

 

" At my poor house at St. Paul's,

26th October 1624."

 

Henry married209  Bridgett WHITE 207,208  daughter of John WHITE and Frances BUTLER on 20 Dec 1610 in Oakley, Hampshire, England. Bridgett was born about 1590 in Southwick, England. She died on 4 Sep 1672.

 

Full text of "The life and letters of John Donne, dean of St. Paul's. Now for the first time rev. and

collected" <http://www.archive.org/stream/lifeandlettersof02gossuoft/lifeandlettersof02gossuoft_djvu.txt>

 

The Lady Kingsmell, to whom the next letter was addressed, had been the Bridget White to whom, in

earlier years, Donne had gaily written some notes which have been published already in their place. Her

husband, Sir Henry Kingsmell, died on the very day on which Donne indited this elaborate letter of

consolation to the widow.

 

" 'To the Honourable Lady the Lady KINGSMELL upon

the death of her husband}" Vf

 

" MADAME, Those things which God dissolves at once, as He shall do the sun and moon and those

bodies at the last conflagration, He never intends to reunite again ; but in those things which He takes in

pieces, as He does man and wife in these divorces by death, and in single persons by the divorce of

body and soul, God hath another purpose to make them up again. That piece which He takes to Himself

is presently cast in a mould, and in an instant made fit for His use ; for heaven is not a place of a

proficiency, but of present perfection. That piece which He leaves behind in this world, by the death of a

part thereof, grows fitter and fitter for Him by the good use of His corrections and the entire conformity to

His will.

 

" Nothing disproportions us, nor make us so uncapable of being reunited to those whom we loved here,

as murmuring or not advancing the goodness of Him who hath removed them from hence. We would

wonder to see a man who, in a wood, were left to his liberty to fell what trees he would, take only the

crooked and leave the straightest trees; but that man hath perchance a ship to build and not a house,

and so hath use of that kind of timber ; let not us who know that in God's house there are many mansions,

but yet have no model, no design of the form of that building, wonder at His taking in of His materials,

why He takes the young and leaves the old, or why the sickly overlive those that had better health. We

are not bound to think that souls departed have divested all affections towards them whom they left here ;

but we are bound to think that for all their loves they would not be here again. Then is the will of God

done in earth, as it is in heaven, when we neither pretermit His actions nor

 

resist them, neither pass them over in an inconsideration as though God had no hand in them, nor go

about to take them out of His hands as though we could direct Him to do them better.

 

"As God's Scriptures are His will, so His actions are His will ; both are testaments, because they testify

His mind to us. It is not lawful to add a schedule to either of His wills, as they do ill who add to His written

will, the Scriptures, a schedule of Apocryphal books ; so do they also, who to His other will, His

manifested actions, add Apocryphal conditions and a schedule of such limitations as these, ' if God

would have stayed thus long,' or 'if God would have proceeded in this or this manner I could have borne

it.' To say that our afflictions are greater than we can bear is so near to despairing as that the same

words express both ; for when we consider Cain's

words in that original tongue in which God spake, we cannot tell whether the words be, My punishment is

greater than can be born, or, My sin is greater than can be forgiven.

 

"But, Madame, you who willingly sacrificed your self to God in your obedience to Him in your own

sickness cannot be doubted to dispute with Him about any part of you which He shall be pleased to

require at your hands. The difference is great in the loss of an arm or a head, of a child or a husband ; but

to them who are in corporated into Christ, their head, there can be no beheading ; upon you, who are a

member of the spouse of Christ, the Church, there can fall no widowhood, nor orphanage upon those

children to whom God is father. I have not another office by your husband's death, for I was your

chaplain before in my daily prayers, but I shall enlarge that office with other collects than before, that God

will continue to you that peace which you have ever had in Him, and send you quiet and peaceable

dispositions in all them with whom you shall have anything to do in your temporal estate and matters of

this world, Amen. Your Ladyship's very humble and thankful servant in Christ Jesus,

 

"J. DONNE.

 

" At my poor house at St. Paul's,

26th October 1624."

 

 

Henry and Bridgett had the following children:

 

+         72 M        i.  William KINGSMILL  was born about 1613. He died in 1661.

             73 M        ii.  Daniel KINGSMILL  was born about 1618.

             74 F        iii.  Bridget KINGSMILL .

 

    48. Richard KINGSMILL 210,211  (William, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1588/1589 in Sidmanton, Hampshire, England. He was buried in Jamestown settlement, Virginia, America.

 

Richard signed a will on 2 Apr 1593. He emigrated before 1616 from Travelled to Virginia on the Delaware. He was counted in a census in 1623/1624 in Jamestown settlement, Virginia, America.

 

Richard Kingsmill was a member of the Virginia Company, an organization chartered in England and

charged with the founding and settlement of Virginia. He was given one of the first land grants of 300

acres in the southwest area of Kingsmill.

 

1.Richard Kingsmill was an Ancient Planter, having come to Virginia in the Delaware before 1616. He is

referred to as Mr Richard Kingsmill and Richard Kingsmill, Gent., and may have been the third son of Sir

William Kingsmill, of Sidmonton, Hampshire, and his wife Bridgett Raleigh. His wife Jane came in the

Susan. They were listed in the Neck of Land near James City, 16 Feb. 1623/4, and in the muster, 4 Feb.

1624/5, when they had a son Nathaniel, aged 5 years, and a daughter Susan, aged 1 year. Both these

children died early as a daughter Elizabeth was the ‘only daughter & heire.’

 

 

Richard Kingsmill served as a representative from James City in the General Assemblies of 1624, 1625

and 1629. He owned land on James City Island which later belonged to Nicholas Meriwether, wrote

Peter Marten’s will, was overseer of the will of the Rev. Richard Buck and was guardian of Peleg Buck.

He was alive 9 July 1630 but dead by 26 Sept. 1638. Although he had no living descendants, his

prominence justifies this brief account. Kingsmill Pond in James City County survives to perpetuate his

name.

Issue: 2. Nathaniel, born 1619, died young; 3. Susan, born 1623, died young; 4. ELIZABETH.

4. ELIZABETH KINGSMILL (Richard), born 1625, married (1), by 1638, William Tayloe, Gent., of

Chiskiake. She married (2), as his (2) wife, Col. Nathaniel Bacon, Sr., of Kings Creek, York County,

burgess for York, 1656, 1659-90, member of the Council, 1656-58, 1661-92, Auditor General, 1675-87,

and President of the Council and acting governor, 1689, who was baptized 29 Aug. 1620 at Burgate,

Suffolk, and died 16 March 1691/2 in his 73rd year, leaving will 15 March 1691/2-24 March 1691/2.

Elizabeth died 2 Nov. 1691 in her 67th year; her tombstone, now at St. Paul’s Church, Norfolk, bears the

arms of Kingsmill, dexter, and the arms of Tayloe, sinister.

 

Richard married Jane 212 .

 

Jane was counted in a census in 1623/1624 in Jamestown settlement, Virginia, America. She emigrated before 1623 from Travelled to Virginia on the Susan.

 

They had the following children:

             75 M        i.  Nathaniel KINGSMILL 213  was born about 1620 in Jamestown settlement, Virginia, America.

 

Nathaniel was counted in a census in 1624/1625 in Jamestown settlement, Virginia, America.

 

Died young.

 

             76 F         ii.  Susan KINGSMILL 214  was born about 1624 in Jamestown settlement, Virginia, America.

 

Susan was counted in a census in 1624/1625 in Jamestown settlement, Virginia, America.

 

Died young.

 

             77 F        iii.  Elizabeth KINGSMILL 215  was born about 1625 in Jamestown settlement, Virginia, America. She died on 2 Nov 1691 in Jamestown settlement, Virginia, America. She was buried in St. Paul’s Church, Norfolk, bears the arms of Kingsmill, dexter, and the arms of Tayloe, sinister..

Elizabeth married217  (1) William TAYLOE 216  in 1638 in Jamestown settlement, Virginia, America.

 

William resided in of Chiskiake.

Elizabeth married (2) Colonel Nathaniel BACON 218 . Nathaniel was born about 1620 in Burgate, Suffolk, England. He was christened on 29 Aug 1620 in Burgate, Suffolk, England. He died on 16 Mar 1691 in Jamestown settlement, Virginia, America.

 

Nathaniel was employed as Auditor General in 1656/1658 in York. He was employed as Burgess for York in 1656 in York. He was employed as Member of the Council in 1659/1690 in York. He was employed as President of the Council & Acting Governor, in 1689 in York. He resided in Kings Creek, York County. He signed a will on 15/02 Mar 1691 in Jamestown

 

settlement, Virginia, America.

 

    60. Col. Sir William KINGSMILL 219,220  (Francis, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born in 1596 in Ballyowen,Tipperary, Ireland. He died in 1650 in Ballyowen, Tipperary, Ireland.

 

MP for Cork 1634-1641.

One of the "1649" Officers.

 

William married Dorothy Jane ST LEGER 221,222,223  daughter of Sir Warham ST LEGER and Ursula NEVILLE in 1631 in Ballyowen,Tipperary, Ireland. Dorothy was born in 1594 in Ballyowen,Tipperary, Ireland. She died in Ballyowen,Tipperary, Ireland.

 

They had the following children:

 

+         78 F          i.  Mary KINGSMILL  was born about 1632.

 

+         79 F         ii.  Sidney KINGSMILL  was born about 1632.

 

    61. Dorothea KINGSMILL 224  (Francis, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born before 1612 in England.

 

She was already born when her Grandfather Henry Hunt made his will 20th July 1613.

 

Dorothea married (1) Thomas FLEETWOOD 225 . Thomas was born about 1600. He died on 7 Oct 1631 in Cork, Ireland.

 

Plantationer in Co. Cork during the Elizabethan I and James I time, preceeding the Commonwealth

period in Ireland (per Sir Richard Cox and the Carew Manuscripts.)

 

 

Dorothea married (2) Alexandre le Marchant DE ST. MICHEL .

 

They had the following children:

             80 F          i.  Elisabeth ST MICHEL 226,227  was born228  on 23 Oct 1640 in Bideford, Devon, England. She died229  on 10 Nov 1669 in Clapham, England. She was buried230  on 13 Nov 1669 in St Olave's, London, England.

 

Elisabeth Pepys (Elisabeth de St. Michel) (1640 - 1669) was the wife of Samuel Pepys,

whom she married in 1655, shortly before her fifteenth birthday.

 

Her father, Alexandre de St. Michel, was born a French Catholic, but converted to the

Protestant faith. He married Dorothea, the daughter of Sir Francis Kingsmill, in Ireland.

Elisabeth was born at or around Bideford on 23 October 1640. She died of typhoid on

10 November 1669.

 

Elisabeth was second cousin once removed to the writer Anne Kingsmill Finch.

 

[edit] Elisabeth in Samuel Pepys' Diary

 

Much of the information on Elisabeth comes from her husband's diary. Samuel

remembered their wedding day in great detail, even recalling that Elisabeth had worn a

petticoat trimmed with gold lace. Although the couple had a civil ceremony on 1

December 1655, they always celebrated their wedding anniversary on 10 October 10

as this was when a religious ceremony had been held.

 

It is well known that Samuel himself was unfaithful to Elisabeth, primarily with their own

 

maid; however, it is clear that he held strong feelings for his wife throughout their

relationship. When they were away from each other Samuel greatly missed Elisabeth,

and although they split shortly after marrying for several months, this was possibly due

to Samuel's strong feelings of jealousy. They reunited shortly before the Diary was

begun, and lived in Axe Yard.

 

Samuel's changeable feelings for Elisabeth can be seen throughout his diary. A

resentful sentence from 25 April 1663 suggests jealous feelings surrounding Elisabeth

and her dancing teacher, or perhaps a simple familiarity with Elisabeth, and her self-

confidence: '...merrily practising to dance, which my wife hath begun to learn this day

of Mr. Pembleton, but I fear will hardly do any great good at it, because she is

conceited that she do well already, though I think no such thing.'[2]

 

Samuel's affection towards Elisabeth can be seen prominently in letters during her

severe typhoid fever and after her death, as he apologises to fellow politicians and

naval captains for not attending board meetings for 4 weeks following her death and

not keeping up to date with letters during her illness: 'CAPTAIN ELLIOT, I beg you

earnestly to believe that nothing but the sorrow and distraction I have been in by the

death of my wife, increased by the suddenness with which it pleased God to surprise

me with therewith, after a voyage so full of health and content, could have forced me to

so long a neglect of my private concernments.'[3]

 

After the death of Elisabeth, Samuel commissioned the erection of a bust to be placed

in St. Olave's, and when he finally died in 1703, regardless of the fact that he had had

another long-term relationship after Elisabeth, he was placed to rest next to his wife on

his own orders.

 

 

Elisabeth married233,234  Samuel PEPYS 231,232  on 1 Dec 1655 in  St. Margarets,Westminster,London,England. Samuel was born235  on 23 Feb 1633 in London, England. He died236  on 26 May 1703 in Clapham, England. He was buried237  in St Olave's, London, England.

 

Samuel was employed238  as Member of Parliament. He was employed239  as Naval Administrator .

 

Samuel Pepys, FRS (23 February 1633 – 26 May 1703) was an English naval

administrator and Member of Parliament, who is now most famous for his diary.

Although Pepys had no maritime experience, he rose by patronage, hard work and his

talent for administration, to be the Chief Secretary to the Admiralty under both King

Charles II and subsequently King James II. His influence and reforms at the Admiralty

were important in the early professionalization of the Royal Navy.[1]

 

The detailed private diary he kept during 1660–1669 was first published in the

nineteenth century, and is one of the most important primary sources for the English

Restoration period. It provides a combination of personal revelation and eyewitness

accounts of great events, such as the Great Plague of London, the Second Dutch War

and the Great Fire of London.

 

His surname is usually pronounced /'pi?ps/, sounded the same as the word peeps.

 

Early life

 

Pepys was born in Salisbury Court, Fleet Street, London[3][4][5] on 23 February 1633,

of John Pepys (1601–1680), a tailor, and Margaret Pepys née Kite (d. 1667), daughter

of a Whitechapel butcher.[6] His father's first cousin, Richard Pepys, was elected MP

 

for Sudbury in 1640, and appointed Baron of the Exchequer on 30 May 1654, and Lord

Chief Justice of Ireland, on 25 September 1655.

 

Samuel Pepys was the fifth in a line of eleven children, but child mortality was high and

he was soon the eldest.[7] He was baptised at St Bride's Church on 3 March.[8] Pepys

did not spend all of his infancy in London, and for a while was sent to live with a nurse,

Goody Lawrence, at Kingsland, north of the city.[9] In about 1644 Pepys attended

Huntingdon Grammar School, before being educated at St Paul's School, London,

circa 1646–1650.[10] He attended the execution of Charles I, in 1649.[11]

 

In 1650, he went to Cambridge University, having received a grant from the Mercers

Company.[citation needed] On 21 June 1650 he entered his name for Trinity Hall,

Cambridge,[12] where his uncle, John Pepys, was a fellow.[13] However, in October

he was admitted as a sizar to Magdalene College; he moved there in March 1651 and

took his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1654.[14][15] Later that year, or in early 1655, he

entered the household of another of his father's cousins, Sir Edward Montagu, who

would later be made 1st Earl of Sandwich. He also married the fourteen-year-old

Elisabeth de St Michel, a descendant of French Huguenot immigrants, first in a

religious ceremony, on 10 October 1655, and later in a civil ceremony, on 1 December

1655, at St Margaret's, Westminster.[16]

 

Illness

 

From a young age, Pepys suffered from kidney stones in his urinary tract – a condition

from which his mother and brother John also later suffered.[17] He was almost never

without pain, as well as other symptoms, including "blood in the urine" (hematuria). By

the time of his marriage, the condition was very severe and probably had a serious

effect on his ability to engage in sexual intercourse.

 

In 1657, Pepys took the decision to undertake surgery: this cannot have been an easy

option, as the operation was known to be especially painful and hazardous.

Nevertheless, Pepys consulted Thomas Hollier, a surgeon; and, on 26 March 1658,

the operation took place in a bedroom at the house of Pepys's cousin, Jane Turner.[18]

Pepys' stone was successfully removed[19] and he resolved to hold a celebration on

every anniversary of the operation, which he did for several years.[20] However, there

were long-term effects from the operation: the incision on his bladder broke open again

late in his life, and the procedure may have left him sterile – though there is no direct

evidence for this, as he was childless before the operation.[21]

 

In mid-1658 Pepys moved to Axe Yard, near where the modern Downing Street is

located. He worked as a teller in the exchequer under George Downing.[22]

 

The diary

 

On 1 January 1660, Pepys began to keep a diary. He recorded his daily life for almost

ten years. The women he pursued, his friends, his dealings, are all laid out. His diary

reveals his jealousies, insecurities, trivial concerns, and his fractious relationship with

his wife. It is an important account of London in the 1660s. The juxtaposition of his

commentary on politics and national events, alongside the very personal, can be seen

from the beginning. His opening paragraphs, written in January 1660, begin:

 

    Blessed be God, at the end of the last year I was in very good health, without any

sense of my old pain but upon taking of cold. I lived in Axe yard, having my wife and

servant Jane, and no more in family than us three. My wife, after the absence of her

terms for seven weeks, gave me hopes of her being with child, but on the last day of

 

the year she hath them again.

 

    The condition of the State was thus. Viz. the Rump, after being disturbed by my Lord

Lambert, was lately returned to sit again. The officers of the army all forced to yield.

Lawson lie[s] still in the River and Monke is with his army in Scotland. Only my Lord

Lambert is not yet come in to the Parliament; nor is it expected that he will, without

being forced to it.

 

    – Diary of Samuel Pepys, January 1660.

 

The entries from the first few months are filled with news of General George Monck's

march on London. In April and May of that year – at this time, he was encountering

problems with his wife – he accompanied Montagu's fleet to The Netherlands to bring

Charles II back from exile. Montagu was made Earl of Sandwich on 18 June, and the

position of Clerk of the Acts to the Navy Board was secured by Pepys on 13 July.[23]

As secretary to the board, Pepys was entitled to a £350 annual salary plus the various

gratuities and benefits – including bribes – that came with the job: he rejected an offer of

£1000 for the position from a rival, and moved to official accommodation in Seething

Lane in the City of London soon afterwards.

 

Public life

 

On the Navy Board, Pepys proved to be a more able and efficient worker than

colleagues in higher positions: a fact that often annoyed Pepys, and provoked much

harsh criticism in his diary. Among his colleagues was Admiral Sir William Penn, Sir

George Carteret, Sir John Mennes and Sir William Batten.[24]

 

Learning arithmetic from a private tutor, and using models of ships to make up for his

lack of first-hand nautical experience, Pepys came to play a significant role in the

board's activities. In September 1660 he was made a Justice of the Peace, and on 15

February 1662 Pepys was admitted as a Younger Brother of Trinity House, and on 30

April he received the freedom of Portsmouth. Through Sandwich, he was involved in

the administration of the short-lived English colony at Tangier. He joined the Tangier

committee in August 1662 when the colony was first founded, and became its

treasurer in 1665. In 1663 he independently negotiated a £3000 contract for Norwegian

masts, demonstrating the freedom of action that his superior abilities allowed. He was

appointed to a commission of the royal fishery on 8 April 1664. In early 1665 the start

of the Second Anglo-Dutch War placed great pressure on Pepys. With his colleagues

were either engaged elsewhere or incompetent, Pepys had to deal with a great deal of

business himself. He excelled under the pressure.[25] At the outset he proposed a

centralised approach to supply the navy. His idea was accepted, and he was made

surveyor-general of victualling in October 1665. The position brought a further £300 a

year.[26]

 

His job required that he meet with many people to dispense monies and make

contracts. He often laments over how he "lost his labour" having gone to some

appointment at a coffee house or tavern, there to discover that the person he was

seeking was not within. This was a constant frustration to Pepys.

 

[edit] Major events

 

As well as providing a first-hand account of the Restoration, Pepys's diary is notable

for its detailed and unique accounts of several other major events of the 1660s. In

particular it is an invaluable source for the study of the Second Anglo-Dutch War of

1665-7, of the Great Plague of 1665, and of the Great Fire of London in 1666. In

 

relation to the Plague and Fire, C.S. Knighton has written: 'From its reporting of these

two disasters to the metropolis in which he thrived, Pepys's diary has become a

national monument.'[27] Again writing about these events, Robert Latham – the editor

of the definitive edition of the diary – has remarked: 'His descriptions of both –

agonisingly vivid – achieve their effect by being something more than superlative

reporting; they are written with compassion. As always with Pepys it is people, not

literary effects, that matter.'[28]

 

Second Anglo-Dutch War

 

In early 1665 the start of the Second Anglo-Dutch War placed great pressure on Pepys.

With his colleagues being either engaged elsewhere or incompetent, Pepys had to

deal with a great deal of business himself. He excelled under the pressure, which was

extremely great given the complex and badly-funded nature of the Royal Navy.[29] At

the outset he proposed a centralised approach to supplying the fleet. His idea was

accepted, and he was made surveyor-general of victualling in October 1665. The

position brought a further £300 a year.[30]

 

In 1667, with the war lost, Pepys helped to discharge the navy.[31] The Dutch, who

had defeated England on open water, now began to threaten the mainland itself. In

June 1667 the Dutch conducted their Raid on the Medway, broke the defensive chain

at Gillingham, and towed away the Royal Charles, one of the Royal Navy's most

important ships. As with the Fire and the Plague, Pepys again evacuated his wife and

his gold from London.[32] While the Dutch raid was a major concern in itself, Pepys

was personally placed under a different kind of pressure: the Navy Board, and his role

as Clerk of the Acts, came under scrutiny from the public and from parliament. The war

ended in August, and on 17 October the House of Commons created a committee of

'miscarriages'.[33] On 20 October, a list of ships and commanders at the time of the

division of the fleet in 1666 was demanded from Pepys.[34] However, these demands

were actually quite desireable for him: tactical and strategic mistakes were not the

responsibility of the Navy Board. The Board did face some allegations regarding the

Medway raid, but they were able to exploit the criticism already attracted by the

commissioner of Chatham, Peter Pett, to deflect criticism from themselves.[35] The

committee accepted this tactic when they reported in February 1668. The Board was,

however, criticised for its use of tickets to pay seamen. These tickets could only be

exchanged for cash at the Navy's treasury in London.[36] Pepys made a long speech

at the bar of the Commons on 5 March 1668 defending this practice. It was, in the

words of C.S. Knighton, a 'virtuoso performance'.[37]

 

The commission was followed by an investigation led by a more powerful authority, the

commissioners of accounts. They met at Brooke House, Holborn, and spent two years

scrutinising how the war had been financed. In 1669 Pepys had to prepare detailed

answers to the committee's eight 'Observations' on the Navy Board's conduct, and in

1670 he was forced to defend his own role. A seaman's ticket with Pepys's name on it

was produced as incontrovertible evidence of his corrupt dealings, but thanks to the

intervention of the king Pepys emerged from the sustained investigation relatively

unscathed.[38]

 

[edit] Great Plague

 

    For more details on this topic, see The Great Plague of London.

 

Outbreaks of plague were not particularly unusual events in London: major epidemics

had occurred in 1592, 1603, 1625, and 1636.[39] Furthermore, Pepys was not among

 

the group of people who were most at risk: he did not live in cramped housing, he did

not routinely mix with the poor, and he was not required to keep his family in London in

the event of a crisis.[40] It was not until June that the unusual seriousness of the

plague became apparent, and Pepys's activities in the first five months of the year

were not significantly impacted by plague.[41] Indeed, Claire Tomalin writes that 'the

most notable fact about Pepys's plague year is that to him it was one of the happiest of

his life.' In 1665 he toiled very hard at arduous work, but the outcome was that he

quadrupled his fortune.[42] On 31 December, in his annual summary, he wrote that 'I

have never lived so merrily (besides that I never got so much) as I have done this

plague time'.[43] Nonetheless, it was not the case that Pepys was completely

unconcerned by the plague. On 16 August he wrote that:

 

    But, Lord! how sad a sight it is to see the streets empty of people, and very few upon

the 'Change. Jealous of every door that one sees shut up, lest it should be the plague;

and about us two shops in three, if not more, generally shut up.

    — Diary of Samuel Pepys, Wednesday, 16 August 1665.

 

He also chewed tobacco as a protection against infection, and worried that wig-makers

might be using the hair of dead people as a raw material. Furthermore, it was Pepys

who suggested that the Navy Office should evacuate to Greenwich, although he did

offer to remain in town himself. He would later take great pride in his stoicism.[44]

Meanwhile, Elisabeth Pepys was sent to Woolwich.[45] He did not return to Seething

Lane until January 1666, and was shocked by the sight of St Olave's churchyard,

where 300 people had been buried.[46]

 

[edit] Great Fire of London

 

In the early hours of 2 September 1666, Pepys was woken by his servant who had

spotted a fire in the Billingsgate area. He decided the fire was not particularly serious,

and returned to bed. Shortly after waking, his servant returned, and reported that 300

houses had been destroyed and that London Bridge was threatened. Pepys went to

the Tower to get a better view. Without returning home, he took a boat and observed

the fire for over an hour. In his diary, Pepys recorded his observations as follows:

 

    I down to the water-side, and there got a boat and through bridge, and there saw a

lamentable fire. Poor Michell's house, as far as the Old Swan, already burned that way,

and the fire running further, that in a very little time it got as far as the Steeleyard, while

I was there. Everybody endeavouring to remove their goods, and flinging into the river

or bringing them into lighters that layoff; poor people staying in their houses as long as

till the very fire touched them, and then running into boats, or clambering from one pair

of stairs by the water-side to another. And among other things, the poor pigeons, I

perceive, were loth to leave their houses, but hovered about the windows and balconys

till they were, some of them burned, their wings, and fell down. Having staid, and in an

hour's time seen the fire: rage every way, and nobody, to my sight, endeavouring to

quench it, but to remove their goods, and leave all to the fire, and having seen it get as

far as the Steele-yard, and the wind mighty high and driving it into the City; and every

thing, after so long a drought, proving combustible, even the very stones of churches,

and among other things the poor steeple by which pretty Mrs.————lives, and whereof

my old school-fellow Elborough is parson, taken fire in the very top, an there burned till

it fell down

    — Diary of Samuel Pepys, Sunday, 2 September 1666.

 

Seeing that the wind was driving the fire westward, he ordered the boat to go to

 

Whitehall, and became the first person to inform the king of the fire. The king told him

to go to the Lord Mayor, Thomas Bloodworth and tell him to start pulling houses down.

Pepys took a coach back as far as St Paul's Cathedral, before setting off on foot

through the burning city. He found the Lord Mayor, who said: "Lord! what can I do? I

am spent: people will not obey me. I have been pulling down houses; but the fire

overtakes us faster than we can do it." At noon he returned home and 'had an

extraordinary good dinner, and as merry, as at this time we could be', before returning

to watch the fire in the city once more. Later, he returned to Whitehall, then met his

wife in St James's Park. In the evening they watched the fire from the safety of

Bankside: Pepys writes that 'it made me weep to see it'. Returning home, Pepys met

his clerk, Tom Hayter, who had lost everything. Hearing news that the fire was

advancing, he started to pack up his possessions by moonlight.

 

A cart arrive at 4am on 3 September, and Pepys spent much of the day arranging the

removal of his possessions. Many of his valuables, including his diary, were sent to

friend of the Navy Office at Bethnal Green.[47] At night he 'fed upon the remains of

yesterday's dinner, having no fire nor dishes, nor any opportunity of dressing any thing.

' The next day, Pepys continued to arrange the removal of his possessions. By this

point, he believed that Seething Lane was in grave danger, and suggested calling men

from Deptford to help pull-down houses and defend the king's property.[48] He

described the chaos in the city, and his curious attempt at saving his own goods:

 

    Sir W. Pen and I to Tower-streete, and there met the fire burning three or four doors

beyond Mr. Howell's, whose goods, poor man, his trayes, and dishes, shovells, &c.,

were flung all along Tower-street in the kennels, and people working therewith from

one end to the other; the fire coming on in that narrow streete, on both sides, with

infinite fury. Sir W. Batten not knowing how to remove his wine, did dig a pit in the

garden, and laid it in there; and I took the opportunity of laying all the papers of my

office that I could not otherwise dispose of. And in the evening Sir W. Pen and I did dig

another, and put our wine in it; and I my Parmazan cheese, as well as my wine and

some other things.

 

On Wednesday, 5 September, Pepys – who had taken to sleeping on his office floor –

was woken by his wife at 2am. She told him that the fire had almost reached All

Hallows-by-the-Tower, and that it was at the foot of Seething Lane. He decided to send

her and his gold – about £2350 – to Woolwich. In the following days Pepys witnessed

looting, disorder and disruption. On 7 September he went to Paul's Wharf and saw the

ruins of St Paul's cathedral, of his old school, of his father's house, and of the house in

which he had had his stone removed.[49] Despite all this destruction, Pepys's house,

office and diary had been saved.

 

Personal Life

 

The diary gives a detailed account of Pepys's personal life. He liked wine and plays,

and the company of other people. He also spent a great deal of time evaluating his

fortune and his place in the world. He was always curious and often acted on that

curiosity, as he acted upon almost all his impulses. Periodically he would resolve to

devote more time to hard work instead of leisure. For example, in his entry for New

Year's Eve, 1661, he writes: "I have newly taken a solemn oath about abstaining from

plays and wine ...". The following months reveal his lapses to the reader; by 17

February, it is recorded, "Here I drank wine upon necessity, being ill for the want of it."

 

As well as being one of the most important civil servants of his age, Pepys was a

 

widely cultivated man, taking an interest in books, music, the theatre, and science. He

was passionately interested in music; and he composed, sang, and played, for

pleasure. He played the lute, viol, violin, flageolet, recorder and spinet to varying

degrees of proficiency.[50] He was also a keen singer, and performed at home, in

coffee houses and even in Westminster Abbey.[51] He and his wife took flageolet

lessons from the master Thomas Greeting.[52] He also taught his wife to sing, and

paid for dancing lessons for her (although these stopped when he became jealous of

the dancing master).

 

[edit] Sexual relations

 

Propriety did not prevent him from engaging in a number of extramarital liaisons with

various women: these were chronicled in his diary, often in some detail, and generally

using a cocktail of languages (English, French and Spanish) when relating the intimate

details. The most dramatic of these encounters was with Deborah Willet, a young

woman engaged as a companion for Elisabeth Pepys. On 25 October 1668 Pepys was

surprised by his wife whilst embracing Deborah Willet: he writes that his wife "coming

up suddenly, did find me imbracing the girl con my hand sub su coats; and endeed I

was with my main in her cunny. I was at a wonderful loss upon it and the girl also....".

Following this event, he was characteristically filled with remorse but (equally

characteristically) this did not prevent his continuing to pursue Willet when she had

been dismissed from the Pepys household.[53]

 

[edit] The text of the diary

 

The diary was written in one of the many standard forms of shorthand used in Pepys's

time, in this case called Tachygraphy and devised by Thomas Shelton. Though it is

clear from its content that it was written as a purely personal record of his life and not

for publication, there are indications Pepys actively took steps to preserve the bound

manuscripts of his diary. Apart from writing it out in fair copy from rough notes, he also

had the loose pages bound into six volumes, catalogued them in his library with all his

other books, and must have known that eventually someone would find them

interesting.

 

[edit] After the diary

 

Throughout the period of the diary, his health, particularly his eyesight, suffered from

the long hours he worked. At the end of May 1669, he reluctantly concluded that, for

the sake of his eyes, he should completely stop writing and, from then on, only dictate

to his clerks[54] which meant he could no longer keep his diary. Pepys and his wife

took a holiday to France and the Low Countries in June–October 1669; on their return,

Elisabeth fell ill and died on 10 November 1669. Pepys erected a monument to her in

the church of St Olave's, Hart Street, in London.

 

[edit] Member of Parliament and Secretary to the Admiralty

 

In 1672 he became an Elder Brother of Trinity House and in the following year he was

promoted to Secretary to the Admiralty Commission and elected MP for Castle Rising

in Norfolk. In May 1676, he was elected as Master of Trinity House and served in this

capacity to 1689.

 

In 1673 he was involved with the establishment of the Royal Mathematical School at

Christ's Hospital, which was to train 40 boys annually in navigation, for the benefit of

the Royal Navy and the British merchant navy. In 1675 he was appointed a Governor

of Christ's Hospital, and for many years he took a close interest in its affairs. Among

 

his papers are two detailed memoranda on the administration of the school. In 1699

after the successful conclusion of a seven-year campaign to get the master of the

Mathematical School replaced by a man who knew more about the sea, he was

rewarded for his service as a Governor by being made a Freeman of the City of

London.

 

At the beginning of 1679 Pepys was elected MP for Harwich in Charles II's third

parliament which formed part of the Cavalier Parliament. He was elected along with Sir

Anthony Deane, a Harwich alderman and leading naval architect, to whom Pepys had

been patron since 1662. By May of that year, they were under attack from their political

enemies. Pepys resigned as Secretary to the Admiralty, and they were imprisoned in

the Tower of London on suspicion of treasonable correspondence with France,

specifically leaking naval intelligence. The charges are believed to have been

fabricated under the direction of the Anthony Ashley-Cooper, 2nd Earl of Shaftesbury.

[55] Pepys was accused, among other things, of being a papist. They were released in

July, but proceedings against them were not dropped until June 1680.

 

Though he had resigned from the Tangier committee in 1679, in 1683 he was sent to

Tangier to assist Lord Dartmouth with the evacuation and abandonment of the British

colony. After six months' service, he travelled back through Spain, returning to England

on 30 March 1684. In June 1684, once more in favour, he was appointed King's

Secretary for the affairs of the Admiralty, a post that he retained after the death of

Charles II (February 1685) and the accession of James II. The phantom Pepys Island,

alleged to be near South Georgia, was named after him in 1684, having been first

discovered during his tenure at the Admiralty.

 

From 1685 to 1688, he was active not only as Secretary for the Admiralty, but also as

MP for Harwich. He had been elected MP for Sandwich, but was contested and

immediately withdrew to Harwich. When James fled the country at the end of 1688,

Pepys's career also came to an end. In January 1689, he was defeated in the

parliamentary election at Harwich; in February, one week after the accession of

William and Mary, he resigned his secretaryship.

 

[edit] Royal Society

 

He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1665 and served as its President from

1 December 1684, to 30 November 1686. Isaac Newton's Principia Mathematica was

published during this period and its title-page bears Pepys' name. There is a probability

problem, called the "Newton–Pepys problem", that arose out of correspondence

between Newton and Pepys about whether one is more likely to roll at least one six

with six dice or at least two sixes with twelve dice. [56] It has been only recently noted

that while the gambling advice Newton gave Pepys was correct, the logical argument

Newton included with it was unsound. [57]

 

[edit] Retirement

 

From May to July 1689, and again in June 1690, he was imprisoned on suspicion of

Jacobitism, but no charges were ever successfully brought against him. After his

release, he retired from public life, aged 57. Ten years later, in 1701, he moved out of

London, to a house at Clapham owned by his friend William Hewer, known as 'Will,'

who had begun his career working for Pepys in the admiralty.[58] Clapham was then in

the country though now very much part of Greater London, and Pepys lived there until

his death, on 26 May 1703. He had no children and bequeathed his estate to his

nephew, John Jackson.[59] His former protege and friend Hewer acted as the executor.

 

[60]

 

[edit] Pepys Library

 

Pepys was a lifelong bibliophile and carefully nurtured his large collection of books,

manuscripts, and prints. At his death, there were more than 3,000 volumes, including

the diary, all carefully catalogued and indexed; they form one of the most important

surviving 17th century private libraries. The most important items in the Library are the

six original bound manuscripts of Pepys's diary but there are other remarkable

holdings, including:[61]

 

    * Incunabula by William Caxton, Wynkyn de Worde and Richard Pynson

    * Sixty medieval manuscripts

    * The Pepys Manuscript: a late fifteenth-century English choirbook

    * Naval records such as two of the 'Anthony Rolls', illustrating the Royal Navy's

ships circa 1546, including the Mary Rose

    * Sir Francis Drake's personal almanac

    * Over 1,800 printed ballads: one of the finest collections in existence.[62]

 

Pepys made detailed provisions in his will for the preservation of his book collection;

and, when his nephew and heir, John Jackson, died, in 1723, it was transferred, intact,

to the Pepys Library, a Georgian building standing in the grounds of Magdalene

College, Cambridge, where it can still be seen. The bequest included all the original

book cases and his elaborate instructions that "the placing as to heighth be strictly

reviewed and, where found requiring it, more nicely adjusted".

 

[edit] Publication history of the diary

 

The Reverend John Smith was engaged to transcribe the diaries into plain English;

and he laboured at this task for three years, from 1819 to 1822, unaware that a key to

the shorthand system was stored in Pepys's library a few shelves above the diary

volumes. Smith's transcription – which is also kept in the Pepys Library – was the basis

for the first published edition of the diary, released in two volumes in 1825.

 

A second transcription, done with the benefit of the key, but often less accurately, was

completed in 1875 by Mynors Bright, and published in 1875–1879.[63] Henry B.

Wheatley, drawing on both his predecessors, produced a new edition in 1893[64]–1899,

revised in 1926, with extensive notes and an index.

 

The complete and definitive edition, edited and transcribed by Robert Latham and

William Matthews, was published by Bell & Hyman, London, and the University of

California Press, Berkeley, in nine volumes, along with separate Companion and Index

volumes, over the years 1970–1983. Various single-volume abridgements of this text

are also available.

 

The Introduction in volume I provides a scholarly but readable account of "The Diarist",

"The Diary" ("The Manuscript", "The Shorthand", and "The Text"), "History of Previous

Editions", "The Diary as Literature", and "The Diary as History". The Companion

provides a long series of detailed essays about Pepys and his world.

 

[edit] Biographical studies

 

There are several detailed studies of Pepys' life available. Arthur Bryant published his

three-volume study in 1933–1938, long before the definitive edition of the diary, but,

thanks to Bryant's lively style, it is still of interest. In 1974 Richard Ollard produced a

new biography that drew on Latham's and Matthew's work on the text, and benefited

 

from the author's deep knowledge of Restoration politics. The most recent general

study is by Claire Tomalin, which won the 2002 Whitbread Book of the Year award, the

judges calling it a "rich, thoughtful and deeply satisfying" account that unearths "a

wealth of material about the uncharted life of Samuel Pepys".

 

 

    62. Elizabeth LUCY 240,241  (Constance KINGSMILL, Richard, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1587 in Down, Ampney, Gloucestershire. She was christened on 9 Jun 1588 in Rudford, Gloucestershire, England.

Elizabeth married244  Anthony Reade HUNGERFORD  ""of Downe Ampney""242,243  son of John HUNGERFORD and Mary BERKELEY about 1610 in Down, Ampney, Gloucestershire. Anthony was born about 1585 in Down, Ampney, Gloucestershire. He was christened on 30 Dec 1584 in Hugnerford, Berkshire, England. He died in 1645 in Glouceter, England. He was buried in Down, Ampney, Gloucestershire.

 

They had the following children:

 

+         81 F          i.  Bridget HUNGERFORD  was born about 1611.

 

    64. Baronet Richard LUCY 245  (Constance KINGSMILL, Richard, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) died about 1667.

Richard married Elizabeth COCK 246 .

 

They had the following children:

 

+         82 M        i.  Kingsmill LUCY  died in 1678.

 

    66. Anne CORDRAY 247  (Bridgett GODDARD, Mary KINGSMILL, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1609. She died in 1671.

Anne married Richard BERNARD 248 . Richard died after 1652 in Virginia, America.

 

They had the following children:

 

+         83 F          i.  Anna BERNARD .

 

    67. John COOPER  (John COOPER, Jane KINGSMILL, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1598 in Wimborne, Dorset,England. He died on 23 Mar 1631 in Rockburne,Sham,Dorset,England.

John married Ann ASHLEY  daughter of Anthony ASHLEY and Jane OKEOVER in 1617 in Dorset,England. Ann was born about 1602 in Winbourne,St Giles,Dorset,England. She died on 20 Jul 1328 in Wimborne,,Dorset,England.

 

They had the following children:

 

+         84 M        i.  Anthony Ashley COOPER  was born on 22 Jul 1621. He died on 22 Jan 1683.

 

    68. Peter MONTAGUE 249  (Margaret M MALTHOUSE, Margaret BULLOCK, Alice KINGSMILL, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1573. He died about 1638.

Peter married Eleanor ALLEN 250 . Eleanor was born about 1579. She died about 1658.

 

Peter and Eleanor had the following children:

 

+         85 M        i.  Peter II MONTAGUE  was born in 1603. He died in 1659.

 

 

Eighth Generation

 

    69. Lieut. Henry* KINGSMILL 251,252,253  (Anthony*, Anthony*, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born before 1648 in Castlelyons, Co. Cork.

 

Born before 1648, of Castlelyons, Co. Cork._Henry Kingsmill b. 1630-1640 Casteiyons_Descent of

Palmer Kingsmill Abbott tree indicates Henry Kingsmill, officer in the army of William III, mar. Miss Dunne,

dau. of 'Squire Dunne', probably descended from Brian (Oge) Dunne d. 1661, who married Sybilla, dau.

of Sir R. Pigott and Anne St. Leger, dau of William, son of Sir Anthony St Leger, Lord Deputy.__We know

definitely (s*?) that this 'Henry Kingsmill of Castlelyons in the Co. Cork, gent., nephew and next of kin of

the 'deceased', was granted administration of the estate of the Rev. Augustine Kingsmill of the same

county on the 16/6/1669. Therefore, he must have been of age at least which gives us his latest birth-

date. Also, we can definitely place him as the grandson of the Rev. Anthony Kingsmill snr. (F26) who had

livings in Kent and Ireland, although we do not know which of this Anthony’s children was his father. Any

one of several already recorded (rr*) is probable.__There are some traditions as to the origin of this Henry

Kingsmill, which cannot be ignored. In 'Chronicles of the Kingsmills', (a 20 page pamphlet, printed in

1874, by the Rev. Dr Joseph Thomas Kingsmill of the Queens County branch, who died in 1931) we

have the following:__'Eighteen years after the death of this good lady, (Bridget Kingsmill’) three brothers,

Henry, Thomas & Anthony Kingsmill, went over to Ireland with William III. One was a Lieutenant, and one

a chaplain in the army, but family tradition (upon which we have now entered) does not inform us which

was the Lieutenant, or which the chaplain, or what was the profession of the third brother. However, this

point is agreed upon, that this Henry Kingsmill settled in the country when the war was over, and married

Miss Flood of Middlemount. The Kingsmill’s of Kilkenny were descended from him, and to this day, Henry

has been a popular name among them.'__Regarding this, we may state that these Kingsmills of Kilkenny

mentioned above, were an offshoot in that town of the Queens Co. Kingsmills. They were not the Parr

Kingsmills of Kilkenny who were already settled there, and are so mentioned quite separately by this

same chronicler. Further, the Henry Kingsmill who married Miss Flood, was the son of this Henry of King

William III’s time. As to the names of the other two brothers, Thomas & Anthony, who went with Henry to

Ireland, the three names do not coincide with the Kingsmill contemporaries then in England. Actually, by

authentic records, an Anthony was definitely in Ireland in 1615-42, a Thomas Sheriff of Cork in 1697 and

earlier of Mallow was probably the son and grandson of F17 & E6 respectively, both Kingsmills of Mallow:

a Henry, almost certainly this Henry and grandson of clergymen already settled in Co. Cork for two

generations. Further, there were actually three brothers: Henry, Thomas and Anthony, and two extra, but

during William III’s Irish War, existed only in the womb of time. All this illustrates the value, and the

danger, of family tradition. We may accept one probability, that our present Henry Kingsmill, H18, served

under William III in Ireland, and was already there when he joined the army, and another Kingsmill, at

least, was with him.Our second evidence as to Henry (H18) comes from the genealogical notes (1868) of

his great-great-granddaughter Eleanor Kingsmill jnr., born in 1787 and wife of Thomas Abbott jnr. She

wrote:__'Dr. Kingsmill was right when he said there was one generation missing - in my haste I forgot to

say that the first Henry Kingsmill was an officer in William’s army. His regiment was either stationed in

the town of Amargh, or passing through on their march, when a young lady saw him, and at first sight fell

desperately in love with him. She was the daughter to Squire Dunn of Mote. She was a Catholic. The

marriage settlement was made in this way- if they should have a family the daughters were to go with

their Mother, if sons they were to go with their Father. They had five sons, so popery died in our family. I

can only tell what became of the three sons, Henry, Tom and Anthony.'__This account is clear and

 

satisfactory: it must be remembered that the writer’s grandfather could have spoken of his own

grandparents, viz., this Henry Kingsmill (H18) and ‘Squire Dunn’s’ daughter.__The third evidence of this

Henry Kingsmill comes from a Pedigree of the Queens County Kingsmills, printed in 1901 by the Rev. Dr.

Thomas Kingsmill Abbott, Senior Fellow 9in 1911) and librarian of Trinity College Dublin. He commences

a generation before our Henry (H18), with:__'Kingsmill, of a Hampshire family, several members of which

came to Ireland temp. Elizabeth. Supposed by the Rev. W. Major Kingsmill, a careful genealogist (d.

1900) to be descended from Rev. Anthony Kingsmill, B.A. Camb. 1598, rector of Mallow 1640 (Mallow

then belonging to Sir John Jephson, grandson and grandson-in-law of Sir William Kingsmill), son of Rev.

Anthony, vicar of Milton, Kent. There is said to be a tradition, however, that the two brothers, named in

the next column, came to Ireland with William III.'__‘in the next column he shows this Kingsmill’s two sons,

viz. ‘Henry (Lieut.) m. daughter of ‘Squire Dunne’ and continues’__'William (Rev.) (these two brothers

were in the army of William III. The Kingsmill family tradition is that Miss Dunne fell in love with Lieut.

Kingsmill on seeing him riding with his troop through Dundalk. There is some doubt whether the Lieut.

was Henry or William.'__William’s issue is not continued, but his brother, Henry, is shown as having had

four sons, viz. 'William', ‘Thomas’ (d. 1774, had a reputed son 'Richard'), 'Henry' (md. Mary (?) Flood),

and 'Anthony.' From the Kingsmill/Flood marriage Dr. Kingsmill Abbott continues the Queens Co.

pedigree to modern times, as will be shown in the appropriate place.__Our fourth evidence touching on

Henry KingsmillH18, was the latest to be discovered, (1928), though written before any of the three

above quoted. It was a letter of 1754 (c*), from Ireland to the Sydmonton Kingsmills, written by William,

the son of Henry, H18. Therein, William shows that his father was no new-comer in Ireland, but of a

clerical family domiciled there about the Elizabethan period. This clarified all the obscurities of the later

traditions narrated above. Henry and his brother (cc*) William, who were (one or the other) remembered

as Lieut. And chaplain in William III’s army, were definitely the kin of Kingsmill’s who fought under

Bagnell, Carew, St. Leger and Inchiquin in Ireland generations earlier.__There is a marriage license fro a

Henry Kingsmill of Dromore in Co. Down, gentleman, and Elizabeth Hall of Garlandstown in Co. Louth,

spinster, dated 1/6/1675. This record is placed here as it may belong to our present Henry, H18, But to

cover all possibilities, we have recorded and set forth the name of another Henry Kingsmill (?H20), with

this as his sole record, amongst the unplaced Irish Kingsmills (dd*) who may be descended from it.__The

romantic story of Squire Dunne’s love struck daughter has survived into it’s third century amongst her

descendants. But no prosaic record has accompanied the tradition. Still, we do not doubt that Henry in a

smart uniform backed by a troop of horse, inspired the Catholic maiden with instant love, though he was

an enemy, a protestant, over forty, and possibly a widower with children. Such things happen often

enough - and more - in war time.

 

***

 

The Battle of the Boyne (Irish: Cath na Bóinne) was fought in 1690 between two rival claimants of the

English, Scottish and Irish thrones - the Catholic King James and the Protestant King William, who had

deposed James in 1688. The battle, won by William, was a turning point in James' unsuccessful attempt

to regain the crown and ultimately helped ensure the continuation of Protestant supremacy in Ireland.

 

The battle took place on July 1, 1690 (Old Style) just outside the town of Drogheda on Ireland's east

coast. The armies stood on opposing sides of the River Boyne. William's forces easily defeated those of

James who led an army of mostly raw recruits. The symbolic importance of this battle has made it one of

the best-known battles in British and Irish history. It is a key part in Ulster Protestant folklore and is still

commemorated today, principally by the Orange Institution. As a consequence of the adoption of the

Gregorian calendar ("New Style" dating), the battle is now commemorated on July 12 each year.

 

Henry* married (1) Elizabeth HALL 254 . Elizabeth was born in Garlandstown, Co. Cork.

 

"of Garlandstown"

 

 

Henry* married (2) ? * DUNNE 255,256,257,258  daughter of Charles* DUNNE and Margaret*

 

COGHLAN.

 

They had the following children:

             86 M        i.  William KINGSMILL 259 .

 

Sheriff of Cork in 1697, previously of Mallow.

 

             87 M        ii.  Thomas KINGSMILL 260  died in 1774 in Ireland.

 

Reputed son Richard

 

 

+         88 M       iii.  Lt. Henry* KINGSMILL  was born about 1699. He died before 1774.

             89 M       iv.  Anthony KINGSMILL 261 .

 

    71. Eleanor TYRELL  (Eleanor KINGSMILL, William, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) died in 1672.

Eleanor married Peter TEMPLE . Peter was born in 1613. He died in 1660.

 

They had the following children:

 

+         90 F          i.  Eleanor TEMPLE .

 

    72. William KINGSMILL 262  (Henry, William, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1613 in Sydmonton, Hampshire, England. He died in 1661.

 

William Kingsmill suffered much during the civil wars. __He was really on the Parliamentary side and only

acted for the king under  compulsion, being forced in 1642 by the king's summons to go to Reading,

where he was made sheriff, 'an office which he took in the honest sense of serving his country for which

it was first ordained.' (fn. 145) __In April 1645 he petitioned the Committee for Compounding to settle him

in his estate in Hampshire, alleging that he had been thrice plundered by express order from the king, by

whom he had been sequestered for the last twelve months, that he had lost £400 in horses and cattle by

Lord Manchester and Sir William Waller when lying at Newbury, and that owing to the position of his

house between the two parties in the middle of the western road he had been obliged to entertain all

comers. He was at length permitted to compound for his estate in May 1651 by payment of a fine of £750.

 

William married264  Anne HASLEWOOD 263  on 21 Feb 1654 in Sydmonton, Hampshire, England. Anne was born about 1639 in Maidwell, Northamptonshire, England.

 

They had the following children:

 

+         91 M        i.  William KINGSMILL  was born about 1660. He died in 1698.

             92 F         ii.  Bridget KINGSMILL .

             93 F        iii.  Anne KINGSMILL  was born in Apr 1661 in Sydmonton, Hampshire. She died on 5 Aug 1720 in Westminster, Middlesex, England.

 

Anne Finch (née Kingsmill), Countess of Winchilsea (April 1661 in Sydmonton,

Hampshire – 5 August 1720 in Westminster, Middlesex) was one of the first female

English poets to be published.

 

She was the third child of Sir William Kingsmill of Sydmonton Court in Hampshire and

his wife, Anne Haslewood. She was well educated as her family believed in good

education for girls as well as for boys. In 1682, Anne Kingsmill went to St James's

Palace to become a Maid of Honour to Mary of Modena (wife of James, Duke of York,

 

who later became King James II.) There she met the courtier Heneage Finch whom

she married on 15 May 1684. It was a very happy marriage and Anne wrote several

love poems to her husband, most famous perhaps A letter to Dafnis.

 

On 4 August 1712, Charles Finch, 4th Earl of Winchilsea died childless. This made his

uncle, Anne's husband, the 5th Earl of Winchilsea, and Anne, the Countess of

Winchilsea. She died in Westminster in 1720 and was buried at her home at Eastwell

in Kent.

 

Anne Finch, the Countess of Winchilsea (1661-1720), was one of England's first

published women poets. Today, some consider her to be England's best female poet

prior to the nineteenth century.

 

As a poet, Finch attained a modest amount of notoriety during her lifetime, which

spanned the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. However, her large body

of work, written during the Augustan period (approximately 1660-1760), would earn

greater attention after her death. While Finch also authored fables and plays, today

she is best known for her poetry: lyric poetry, odes, love poetry and prose poetry. Later

literary critics recognized the diversity of her poetic output as well as its personal and

intimate style.

 

In her works Finch drew upon her own observations and experiences, demonstrating

an insightful awareness of the social mores and political climate of her era. But she

also artfully recorded her private thoughts, which could be joyful or despairing, playful

or despondent. The poems also revealed her highly developed spiritual side.

 

Anne Finch was born as Anne Kingsmill in April of 1661, in Sydmonton in Hampshire,

located in the southern part of England. Her parents were Sir William Kingsmill and

Anne Haslewood. She was the youngest of three children. Her siblings included

William and Bridget Kingsmill.

 

The young Anne never knew her father, as he died only five months after she was born.

In his will, he specified that his daughters receive financial support equal to that of their

brother for their education. Her mother remarried in 1662, to Sir Thomas Ogle, and

later bore Anne Kingsmill's half-sister, Dorothy Ogle. Anne would remain close to

Dorothy for most of their lives.

 

Finch's mother died in 1664. Shortly before her death she wrote a will giving control of

her estate to her second husband. The will was successfully challenged in a Court of

Chancery by Anne Kingsmill's uncle, William Haslewood. Subsequently, Anne and

Bridget Kingsmill lived with their grandmother, Lady Kingsmill, in Charing Cross,

London, while their brother lived with his uncle William Haslewood.

 

In 1670 Lady Kingsmill filed her own Court of Chancery suit, demanding from William

Haslewood a share in the educational and support monies for Anne and Bridget. The

court split custody and financial support between Haslewood and Lady Kingsmill.

When Lady Kingsmill died in 1672, Anne and Bridget rejoined their brother to be raised

by Haslewood. The sisters received a comprehensive and progressive education,

something that was uncommon for females at the time, and Anne Kingsmill learned

about Greek and Roman mythology, the Bible, French and Italian languages, history,

poetry, and drama.

 

[edit] Joined the Court of Charles II

 

The sisters remained in the Haslewood household until their uncle's death in 1682.

 

Twenty-one years old at the time, Anne Kingsmill then went to live at St. James Palace,

in the court of Charles II. She became one of six maids of honor to Mary of Modena,

who was the wife of James, Duke of York, who would later become King James II.

 

Apparently Anne's interest in poetry began at the palace, and she started writing her

own verse. Her friends included Sarah Churchill and Anne Killigrew, two other maids of

honor who also shared poetic interests. However, when Anne Kingsmill witnessed the

derision within the court that greeted Killigrew's poetic efforts (poetry was not a pursuit

considered suitable for women), she decided to keep her own writing attempts to

herself and her close friends. She remained secretive about her poetry until much later

in her life, when she was encouraged to publish under her own name.

 

[edit] Married Colonel Finch

 

While residing at court, Anne Kingsmill also met Colonel Heneage Finch, the man who

would become her husband. A courtier as well as a soldier, Colonel Finch had been

appointed Groom of the Bedchamber to James, Duke of York, in 1683. His family had

strong Royalist connections, as well as a pronounced loyalty to the Stuart dynasty, and

his grandmother had become Countess of Winchilsea in 1628. Finch met Kingsmill and

fell in love with her, but she at first resisted his romantic overtures. However, Finch

proved a persistent suitor and the couple was finally married on May 15, 1684.

 

Upon her marriage, Anne Finch resigned her court position, but her husband retained

his own appointment and would serve in various government positions. As such, the

couple remained involved in court life. During the 1685 coronation of James II,

Heneage Finch carried the canopy of the Queen, Mary of Modena, who had

specifically requested his service.

 

The couple's marriage proved to be enduring and very happy. Indeed, Anne Finch

developed her poetic skills by expressing her joy in marriage. These early works, many

written to her husband (such as "A Letter to Dafnis: April 2d 1685"), celebrated their

relationship and ardent intimacy. In expressing herself in such a fashion, Anne Finch

quietly defied contemporary social conventions. In other early works she aimed a

satiric disapproval at prevailing misogynistic attitudes. Still, her husband strongly

supported her writing activities.

 

Despite their court connections, Anne and Heneage Finch led a rather sedate life. At

first they lived in Westminster; then, as Heneage Finch became more involved in public

affairs, they moved to London. His involvement had increased when James II took the

throne in 1685. The couple demonstrated great loyalty to the king in what turned out to

be a brief reign.

 

[edit] Refused to take Oath of Allegiance to King William

 

James II was deposed in 1688 during the "bloodless revolution." During his short reign,

James fell under intense criticism for his autocratic manner of rule. Eventually he fled

England for exile in Saint-Germain, France. As a result, the British Parliament offered

William of Orange the English crown. When the new monarchs, William and Mary,

assumed the throne, oaths of allegiance became a requirement for both the public and

the clergy. William and Mary were Protestants, and the Finches remained loyal to the

Catholic Stuart court, refusing to take the oath. They also viewed their oaths to the

previous monarchy as morally binding and constant. But such a stance invited trouble.

Heneage Finch lost his government position and retreated from public life. As the loss

of his position entailed a loss of income, the Finches were forced to live with friends in

 

London for a period. However, while living in the city the couple faced harassment,

fines and potential imprisonment.

 

In April of 1690 Heneage Finch was arrested and charged with Jacobitism for

attempting to join the exiled James II in France. It was a difficult time for Jacobites and

Nonjurors (those who had refused to take the oath of allegiance, such as the Finches),

as their arrests and punishments were abusive.

 

Because of his arrest, Heneage and Anne Finch remained separated from April until

November of that year. Understandably, the circumstances caused the couple a great

deal of emotional turmoil. Living with friends in Kent while her husband prepared his

defense in London, Anne Finch often succumbed to bouts of depression, something

that afflicted her for most of her adult life. The poems that she wrote during this period,

such as "Ardelia to Melancholy," reflected her mental state. Other poems involved

political themes. But all of her work was noticeably less playful and joyous than her

earlier output.

 

[edit] Moved to Country Estate

 

After Heneage Finch was released and his case dismissed, his nephew Charles Finch,

the fourth Earl of Winchelsea, invited the couple to permanently move into the family's

Eastwell Park, Kent, estate. The Finches took up residence in late 1690 and found

peace and security on the beautiful estate, where they would live for more than 25

years in the quiet countryside.

 

For Anne Finch, the estate provided a fertile and supportive environment for her literary

efforts. Charles Finch was a patron of the arts and, along with Heneage Finch, he

encouraged Anne's writing. Her husband's support was practical. He began collecting

a portfolio of her 56 poems, writing them out by hand and making corrective changes.

One significant change involved Anne's pen name. Heneage changed it from "Areta" to

"Ardelia."

 

The peace and seclusion at Eastwell fostered the development of Finch's poetry, and

the retirement in the country provided her with her most productive writing period. Her

work revealed her growing knowledge of contemporary poetic conventions, and the

themes she addressed included metaphysics, the beauty of nature (as expressed in "A

Nocturnal Reverie"), and the value of friendship (as in "The Petition for an Absolute

Retreat").

 

[edit] Returned to Public Life

 

By the early 1700s the political climate in England had generally improved for the

Finches. King William died in 1702, and his death was followed by the succession to

the throne of Queen Anne, the daughter of James II, who had died in 1701. With these

developments, the Finches felt ready to embrace a more public lifestyle. Heneage

Finch ran for a parliamentary seat three times (in 1701, 1705, and 1710), but was

never elected. Still, the Finches felt the time was right to leave the seclusion of the

country life and move into a house in London.

 

In London, Anne Finch was encouraged to publish her poetry under her own name.

Earlier, in 1691, she had anonymously published some of her poetry. In 1701 she

published "The Spleen" anonymously. This well-received reflection on depression

would prove to be the most popular of her poems in her lifetime. When the Finches

returned to London, Anne acquired some important and influential friends, including

renowned writers such as Jonathan Swift and Alexander Pope, who encouraged her to

 

write and publish much more openly.

 

Still, Anne Finch was reluctant, as she felt the current social and political climate

remained oppressive as far as women were concerned. (In her poem "The Introduction,

" which was privately circulated, she reflected on contemporary attitudes toward

female poets.) When she published Miscellany Poems, on Several Occasions in 1713,

the cover page of the first printing indicated that the collected works (which included 86

poems as well as a play) were "Written by a Lady." However, on subsequent printings,

Finch (as Anne, Countess of Winchilsea) received credit as the author.

 

[edit] Became Countess

 

Anne Finch became Countess of Winchilsea upon the sudden and unexpected death

of Charles Finch on August 4, 1712. As Charles Finch had no children, his uncle

Heneage Finch became the Earl of Winchilsea, making Anne the Countess. However,

the titles came with a cost. The Finches had to assume Charles Finch's financial and

legal burdens. The issues were eventually settled in the Finches' favor in 1720, but not

before the couple had endured nearly seven years of emotional strain.

 

During this period, Heneage and Anne Finch faced renewed strains resulting from

court politics. When Queen Anne died in 1714, she was succeeded by George I.

Subsequently, a Whig government, which was hostile to the Jacobite cause, rose to

power. Further, the Jacobite rebellion, which took place in Scotland in 1715, further

aggravated the tense political situation. The Finches became greatly concerned about

their safety, especially after a friend, Matthew Prior, who shared their political

sympathies, was sent to prison.

 

[edit] Suffered Deteriorating Health

 

All of the worries combined to take a toll on Anne Finch's health, which began to

seriously deteriorate. For years she had been vulnerable to depression, and in 1715

she became seriously ill. Her later poems reflected her turmoil. In particular, "A

Suplication for the joys of Heaven" and "A Contemplation" expressed her concerns

about her life and political and spiritual beliefs.

 

She died in London on August 5, 1720. Her body was taken back to Eastwell where

she was buried, according to her previously stated wishes. Her husband produced an

obituary that praised her talents as a writer and her virtues as an individual. A portion

of it read, "To draw her Ladyship's just Character, requires a masterly Pen like her own

(She being a fine Writer, and an excellent Poet); we shall only presume to say, she

was the most faithful Servant to her Royall Mistresse, the best Wife to her Noble Lord,

and in every other Relation, publick and private, so illustrious an Example of such

extraordinary Endowments, both of Body and Mind, that the Court of England never

bred a more accomplished Lady, nor the Church of England a better Christian."

Heneage Finch died in 1726.

 

[edit] Poetry Rediscovered

 

The only major collection of Anne Finch's writings that appeared in her lifetime was

Miscellany Poems, on Several Occasions. Nearly a century after her death her poetic

output had been largely forgotten, until the great English poet William Wordsworth

praised her nature poetry in an essay included in his 1815 volume Lyrical Ballads.

 

A major collection titled The Poems of Anne, Countess of Winchilsea, edited by Myra

Reynolds, was published in 1903. For many years it was considered the definitive

 

collection of her writings. It remains the only scholarly collection of Finch's poetry, and

includes all of the poems from Miscellany Poems and poems retrieved from

manuscripts. Further, Reynolds's impressive introduction did as much to re-establish

Finch's reputation as Wordsworth's previous praise.

 

Later, The Wellesley Manuscript, which contained 53 unpublished poems, was

released. Literary scholars have noted Finch's distinctive voice and her poems'

intimacy, sincerity, and spirituality. They also expressed appreciation for her

experimentation as well as her assured usage of Augustan diction and forms.

 

According to James Winn (The Review of English Studies, lix, 2008, pp. 67-85) Anne

Finch is the librettist of Venus and Adonis, music by John Blow. Bruce Wood, in his

critical edition of the opera for the Purcell Society, agrees with Winn.

 

 

Anne married 5th Earl of Winchilsea Heneage FINCH  son of 3rd Earl of Winchilsea Heneage FINCH and Lady Mary SEYMOUR on 14 May 1684. Heneage was born on 3 Jan 1656. He died on 30 Sep 1726.

 

    78. Mary KINGSMILL 265,266,267  (William, Francis, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born268  about 1632 in Ballyowen, Tipperary, Ireland. She died269  in Dromkeen, Limerick, Ireland.

Mary married272  Reverend Ulysses BURGH 270,271  son of Richard DE BURGH. Ulysses was born273  about 1632 in England. He died in 1692 in Dromkeen, Limerick, Ireland.

 

Ulysses was employed as Bishop of Adagh.

 

Bishop of Ardagh

 

 

Ulysses and Mary had the following children:

 

+         94 F          i.  Dorothy BURGH  was born about 1658.

 

    79. Sidney KINGSMILL 274,275  (William, Francis, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born276  about 1632 in Dromiskyne, Louth, Ireland.

Sidney married278  Thomas FORTESCUE 277  son of Sir Faithful FORTESCUE and Hon Anne MOORE about 1658 in Dromiskyne, Louth, Ireland. Thomas was born279  about 1630 in Dromiskyne, Louth, Ireland.

 

They had the following children:

 

+         95 M        i.  Chichester FORTESCUE  was born about 1654.

 

+         96 M        ii.  William FORTESCUE .

 

    81. Bridget HUNGERFORD 280,281  (Elizabeth LUCY, Constance KINGSMILL, Richard, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1611 in Down, Ampney, Gloucestershire.

Bridget married284  Sir Edmund DUNCH  ""of Little Wittenham""282,283  son of Sir William DUNCH and Mary CROMWELL about 1631 in Oxford, England. Edmund was born about 1604 in Westminster, London, England. He died in 1678.

 

They had the following children:

 

+         97 M        i.  Henry Newington DUNCH  was born about 1633. He died about 1686.

 

    82. Kingsmill LUCY 285  (Richard LUCY, Constance KINGSMILL, Richard, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) died in 1678.

Kingsmill married Theophila BERKELEY 286 . Theophila died in 1707.

 

They had the following children:

 

+         98 M        i.  Berkeley LUCY  died in 1759.

 

    83. Anna BERNARD 287  (Anne CORDRAY, Bridgett GODDARD, Mary KINGSMILL, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*).

Anna married John SMITH 288 . John was born in 1624. He died in 1698.

 

They had the following children:

 

+         99 M        i.  John SMITH  was born about 1663. He died in 1698.

 

    84. Anthony Ashley COOPER  (John COOPER, John COOPER, Jane KINGSMILL, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born on 22 Jul 1621 in Wimborne,St Giles,Dorset,England. He died on 22 Jan 1683 in  Amsterdam, Holland.

Anthony married Margaret SPENCER  daughter of 2nd Baron Spencer of Wormleighton William SPENCER and Penelope WRIOTHESLEY. Margaret was born about 1627 in Brington,,Northamptonshire,England. She died about 1693 in Covent Garden,London,Middlesex,England.

 

They had the following children:

 

+       100 F          i.  Penelope Ashleigh COOPER  was born about 1647. She died in 1711.

 

    85. Peter II MONTAGUE 289  (Peter MONTAGUE, Margaret M MALTHOUSE, Margaret BULLOCK, Alice KINGSMILL, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born in 1603 in Berkshire. He died in 1659 in Virginia, America.

Peter married Cicely MATTHEWS 290 .

 

They had the following children:

 

+       101 M        i.  Peter III MONTAGUE  was born about 1631. He died about 1702.

 

 

Ninth Generation

 

    88. Lt. Henry* KINGSMILL  "'of Queen's County'"291,292,293  (Henry*, Anthony*, Anthony*, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1699. He died before 1774.

 

Third son of Henry and only one to leave legitimate issue.

 

Henry* married Mary Ann* FLOOD 294,295  daughter of Luke* FLOOD and Mary* VICARS. Mary was born about 1705.

 

They had the following children:

           102 M        i.  Luke KINGSMILL 296,297,298  was born299,300  about 1730 in Clononane,

 

Queens's Co, Ireland.

 

Luke was employed301  as Gentleman in 1760 in Clononane, Queens's Co, Ireland.

 

Luke Kingsmill was the first of this name, which evidently came from his grandfather,

Luke Flood of Middlemount, Queens Co. Elder of the two sons of Henry Kingsmill, but

had no share beyond 5 Ld in the will of his uncle Thomas.  Another record of him is

given in the memo of 1868: "My grandfather's only brother Luke, married Miss Cecil,

daughter to a rich lawyer.  He got a fortune with her that he did not live to spend.  They

had no family."

The rest of our knowledge of this Luke Kingsmill is drawn from his will dated 3/11/1798,

and proved 2/12/1800 by his widow and 15/1/1811 by his surviving executor and

nephew Luke: witnesses John Shaw, Humphrey White, Dan Dooley.  He left to his wife

Anne, all his interest in land near Donoughmore with stock and furniture to his sister

Margaret Finlay his interest in land at Monamaura less 10 Ld yearly to her sister

Martha Kean; to grandniece, daughter of nephew Luke Kingsmill, interest in

Donoughmore land; to Luke Kingsmill, son to Henry Kingsmill of Borris, interest in the

New Inn, Borris; to my brother John Kingsmill, one shilling as a bar to him against any

demand which he might set up in law or equity to anything whatsoever that I may die

possessed of; another bequest (illegible); executors, wife Anne, Thomas White of

Killadooly, Esq., and nephew Luke. And whereas that villain John Kean, in indebted to

me as may be seen on the opposite side of this paper all of which can be proved by the

several men who I mention thereon I make it my earnest request and it is my will that

he be sued for the same as soon as possible and that any money that may be

recovered from his be equally divided between the sons of my brother....John Kean

owes me the following:-

* Allowed to Josh Abbott and Joseph Dunn of Ballinakill for him Ld ...20.0.0

* Due of the price of the black colt sold to him for 12 guineas which Time Whelan can

prove I received then due....Ld 10.4.9

* A bill sent to Dublin to pay Mr. Maker which he kept ...Ld 14.1.10

* Sent by Dan Dooley to him when he was prisoner in Maryborough: Gayner on

Richard and Palmer, a Bill Ld 20 and cash Ld 2.5.6 ...Ld 22.5.6

* A Bill on Mr William Abbott of Ushers Court Dublin...Ld 20.0.0

* Paid Mr Thomas White of Springfield for his use, which he owed Lady Whelan ...Ld 5.

2.4 1/2

* Paid Mrs. White Killadooly, for Hay for him ... Ld 5.15.0

* Cash sent by Michael Brophy to him to Mr Drought .... Ld 1.14.1 1/2

* Given to him to pay a staymaker which I was obliged to pay a second time.... Ld 1.2.9

* TOTAL Ld 100.6.4d.

 

I was to have Ld 50 yearly during my life by the settled from him in May 95, one penny

of which I never got.  Diet and Lodging for him and his wife for a year and a quarter

and two servants and three horses.  He received Ld 92 that was due to me from

Charles Kegan.

 

We have no record of the proceedings against Luke Kingsmill's reverend brother-in-law

"that villain 'John Kean.'  But his widow and executrix Ann Kingsmill was already dead

before Luke's surviving executor, his nephew Luke, was granted final administration -

after eleven years - on 15/1/1811.

 

 

Luke married305,306  Ann CECILL 302,303,304  daughter of Joseph CECILL on 9 Jun 1760 in Killaloe, Co. Clare, Ireland. Ann was born307,308  about 1739 in

 

Ballykelly, Co. Tipperary, Ireland.

 

Ann was employed309  as Spinster in 1760 in Ballykelly, Co. Tipperary, Ireland.

           103 F         ii.  Margaret KINGSMILL 310 .

Margaret married ? FINLAY .

           104 F        iii.  Celia KINGSMILL 311 .

Celia married ? COSBY 312 .

           105 F        iv.  Martha KINGSMILL 313 .

Martha married Rev. John KEAN 314 .

 

+       106 M       v.  John* KINGSMILL  was born about 1730. He died in 1801.

 

    90. Eleanor TEMPLE 315  (Eleanor TYRELL, Eleanor KINGSMILL, William, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*).

Eleanor married Richard GRENVILLE 316  son of Richard GRENVILLE and Anne BORLACE. Richard was born about 1646. He died in 1719.

 

They had the following children:

 

+       107 M        i.  Richard GRENVILLE  was born about 1678. He died in 1727.

 

    91. William KINGSMILL 317  (William, Henry, William, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1660. He died in 1698.

 

 William Kingsmill died in 1661, leaving a son and heir, Sir William Kingsmill, on whose death in 1698 the

manor of Sydmonton passed to his eldest son, William Kingsmill, who died unmarried in 1766. __This

estate then passed to his niece Elizabeth the daughter of his sister Frances Cory, who married Captain

Robert Brice, afterwards Admiral of the Blue. (fn. 148) Robert took the name of Kingsmill by Act of

Parliament in 1766, was created a baronet on 24 November 1800, and died without issue in 1805. (fn.

149) He left Sydmonton to the Rev. John Stephens, vicar of Chewton Mendip (co. Somers.), (fn. 150)

who assumed the surname and arms of Kingsmill by royal licence in 1806. (fn. 151) He died in 1814,

leaving an eldest surviving son, William Kingsmill, who married Anne Jane daughter of William Howley,

Archbishop of Canterbury, (fn. 152) and died in 1865, leaving issue William Howley Kingsmill, whose son

and heir, Mr. Andrew de Portal Kingsmill, is the present lord of the manor.

 

William married (1) Frances COLWELL 318  about 1681 in Hampshire, England. Frances was born about 1665 in London, Middlesex, England.

 

They had the following children:

           108 M        i.  William KINGSMILL  died in 1766.

 

The manor of Sydmonton passed to his eldest son, William Kingsmill, who died

unmarried in 1766. __This estate then passed to his niece Elizabeth the daughter of his

sister Frances Cory, who married Captain Robert Brice, afterwards Admiral of the Blue.

(fn. 148) Robert took the name of Kingsmill by Act of Parliament in 1766, was created

a baronet on 24 November 1800, and died without issue in 1805. (fn. 149) He left

Sydmonton to the Rev. John Stephens, vicar of Chewton Mendip (co. Somers.), (fn.

150) who assumed the surname and arms of Kingsmill by royal licence in 1806. (fn.

151) He died in 1814, leaving an eldest surviving son, William Kingsmill, who married

Anne Jane daughter of William Howley, Archbishop of Canterbury, (fn. 152) and died in

 

1865, leaving issue William Howley Kingsmill, whose son and heir, Mr. Andrew de

Portal Kingsmill, is the present lord of the manor.

 

           109 M        ii.  Henry KINGSMILL .

           110 F        iii.  Frances KINGSMILL .

Frances married Hugh CORREY .

 

William married (2) Rebecca 319 .

 

    94. Dorothy BURGH 320,321  (Mary KINGSMILL, William, Francis, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born322  about 1658 in Limerick, Ireland.

Dorothy married325  Rev Thomas SMYTH 323,324  son of William SMYTH and Mary DOWDALL about 1681 in England. Thomas was born about 1656 in Dundrun, Down, Ireland. He died in 1725.

 

Thomas was employed as Bishop of Limerick.

 

They had the following children:

 

+       111 F          i.  Dorothy SMYTH  was born about 1685. She died in 1766.

 

    95. Chichester FORTESCUE 326  (Sidney KINGSMILL, William, Francis, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born327  about 1654 in Donoughmore, Down, Ireland.

 

died before his father Thomas. During the reign of James II he lived on his father's estate at

Donoughmore, Co. Down.

 

In the Spring of 1689 Irish soldiers came in force to disperse the Protestants; his wife and three children

went to the Isle of Man. Chichester led troops to the defence of Londonderry but died there, of disease,

before the city was relieved .

 

He was married to Frideswide HALL of Mount Hall in Devon in Sep 1681.

 

Chichester married328  Frideswide HALL  about 1681. Frideswide was born in Mount Hall, Devon, England.

 

They had the following children:

 

+       112 M        i.  Thomas FORTESCUE  was born about 1692.

           113 F         ii.  Sydney FORTESCUE 329  was born330  about 1692 in Down, Ireland.

Sydney married Thomas BOLLTON .

           114 F        iii.  Gertrude FORTESCUE .

           115 F        iv.  Lettice FORTESCUE 331  was born332  about 1688 in Down, Ireland.

 

    96. William FORTESCUE  (Sidney KINGSMILL, William, Francis, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*).

William married Margaret GERNON .

 

They had the following children:

 

+       116 M        i.  Thomas FORTESCUE .

 

    97. Henry Newington DUNCH 333,334  (Bridget HUNGERFORD, Elizabeth LUCY, Constance KINGSMILL, Richard, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1633 in Newington, Oxfordshire, England. He died about 1686.

Henry married Anne DORMER 335,336 . Anne was born about 1635 in Beaconsfield, Bucks, England.

 

They had the following children:

 

+       117 F          i.  Elizabeth DUNCH  was born about 1671. She died before 1751.

 

    98. Berkeley LUCY 337  (Kingsmill LUCY, Richard LUCY, Constance KINGSMILL, Richard, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) died in 1759.

Berkeley married Catherine COTTON 338 .

 

They had the following children:

 

+       118 F          i.  Mary LUCY .

 

    99. John SMITH  ""of Purton""339  (Anna BERNARD, Anne CORDRAY, Bridgett GODDARD, Mary KINGSMILL, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1663. He died in 1698.

 

John was employed as Speaker of the Virginia House of Burgesses.

 

Speaker of the Virginia House of Burgesses

 

John married Mary WARNER 340 . Mary was born about 1664. She died in 1700.

 

They had the following children:

 

+       119 F          i.  Mildred Warner SMITH  was born in 1682.

 

   100. Penelope Ashleigh COOPER  (Anthony Ashley COOPER, John COOPER, John COOPER, Jane KINGSMILL, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1647 in Dorset,England. She died in 1711 in St Peters,New Kent,Virginia,USA.

Penelope married Peter MASSIE  in 1669 in New Kent,,Virginia,USA. Peter was born about 1639 in Coddington, Cheshire,England. He died on 25 Dec 1719 in New Kent, Virginia,USA.

 

They had the following children:

 

+       120 M        i.  George MASSEY  was born about 1669. He died on 13 Mar 2003.

 

   101. Peter III MONTAGUE 341  (Peter II MONTAGUE, Peter MONTAGUE, Margaret M MALTHOUSE, Margaret BULLOCK, Alice KINGSMILL, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1631 in Virginia, America. He died about 1702.

Peter married Mary DOODES 342 . Mary was born about 1642.

 

They had the following children:

 

+       121 F          i.  Mary MONTAGUE  was born about 1665. She died in 1743.

 

 

Tenth Generation

 

   106. John* KINGSMILL  "'of Borris'"343,344,345  (Henry*, Henry*, Anthony*, Anthony*, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1730 in Ireland. He died in 1801 in Donaghhmore, Ossory, Ireland.

 

John of Borris in Ossory, Queens Co., born about 1720-40, younger son of Henry of Queen's Co,

married Eleanor Palmer, died between 24/2/10801 and 25/9/1802.

This John, although younger than his brother Luke, had the preference in the landed interests of his

uncle Thomas.  He was the only male of the Queen's Co. family whose issue continued, and the common

ancestor of a posterity now widely spread over the world.  Many are male-line Kingsmill's, and amongst

others we can name Kingsmill Abbott's, Christians, Browns, Dixon's, Jones, Alcock's, now in Great

Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Tasmania, South Africa and U.S.A.

For a generation or two after John had cut off his four surviving sons 'with a shilling and a penny each',

some of them resorted to Kilkenny;  This has caused confusion with the Parr Kingsmill family long

established separately in that city.  This branch can trace back with unusual certainty to the earliest

Hampshire cords, all of them through John Kingsmill.

John Kingsmill is described by his grand-daughter as follows:

"John married Eleanor Palmer only sister of Paul Palmer of Derreen.  They had five sons and two

daughters - Henry, Tom, Luke, Anthony and John, Sophia (and) the Rev. T.K. Abbott's grandmother."

John Kingsmill left and unusual will which contains much information.  He describes himself as Borris-in-

Ossory, Queens Co. 'very weak and feeble of body, but of perfect sound mind and memory, thanks to

God, and knowing that it is appointed for all mankind once to die." Then, less piously, he states that the

death of his brother Luke entitles him to certain rights and interests.  He leaves his three sons, Luke,

Thomas and Anthony, and his son Harry's son John, to recover these, and gives them each an eighth

share of the proceeds if any: if none, then one shilling and one penny each.  He gives his son Harry also

one shilling and one penny, and parts from all five "hereby totally cutting them off from receiving any

more of my "worldly substance."  John does not specify in his will the particular right or interest to which

he was entitled on the death of his brother Luke, who had already left him a shilling as a bar against any

demand.  The remainder of this irrecoverable right, John bequeathed, one eighth each, to "Eleanor

Abbott and Sophia McClean my two daughters" and to "Elenor Kingsmill and John Kingsmill my two

grandchildren." These last two were the children of a son John who had died early enough to escape his

father's wrath and the usual shilling and a penny.  John, like his brother Luke, was owed money by that

Rev. "villain" and brother-in-law, John Kean, it was a bond for 200 Ld.  So as the testator himself owed

money to Samuel White of Roundwood Esq., and Marmaduke Grace, late of Dublin, Attorney deceased,

he left them to be paid out of John Kean's bond, the balance of which he left in equal shares to daughter

Sophia, and daughter Eleanor's two sons John and Thomas Abbott.  Sophia was also left the remainder

of the lease of a house and garden rented from the reverend John.  A sum of Ld 200 leviable on land and

Moniamore was distributed to daughter Eleanor Abbott (Ld 22.15.0) and her two sons, John (Ld 5) and

Thomas (Ld 5) and her husband Thomas Abbott (Ld 15) the remainder going to the grandchildren John

and Eleanor Kingsmill, already mentioned. These two grandchildren were left to the care of their Aunt

Eleanor (Abbott) and they could not "marry or cohabit with a papist 'or papists' under forfeiture of legacy. 

The executors were Samuel White of Roundwood and son-in-law Thomas Abbott; witnesses, Simon

Miller, Thomas Whitly and Low (?) Watters.

It seems that this John Kingsmill had been impoverished, possibly in the rebellion of 1798 and that some

matter of religion or politics induced him to cut of his four surviving sons and quarrel with his only brother,

Luke.

Neither John nor Luke appeared to have moved on the extinction of the Kingsmill’s at Sidmonton, as their

uncle William had written, about thirty years earlier, this family not only knew their descent, but their

distance from the old Hampshire line..."therefore are determined to decline any pursuit of this nature and

 

content ourselves with the happiness and honour which we have to be allied to so worthy a family."  And

wisely too, for Robert Brice, in possession and with the fortune of his Kingsmill wife could easily have

litigated her distant kindred out of the last of their modest competency.  Yet in John's posterity the

Kingsmill blood survived, and still flourishes far and wide.

 

John* married Eleanor* PALMER 346,347  daughter of Thomas* PALMER and Eleanor* FLETCHER. Eleanor* was born about 1736.

 

John Kingsmill is described by his grand-daughter as follows:

"John married Eleanor Palmer only sister of Paul Palmer of Derreen.  They had five sons and two

daughters - Henry, Tom, Luke, Anthony and John, Sophia (and) the Rev. T.K. Abbott's grandmother."

 

 

John* and Eleanor* had the following children:

 

+       122 M        i.  Henry* KINGSMILL  was born in 1754. He died about 1840.

 

+       123 M        ii.  Thomas snr KINGSMILL  was born about 1762. He died about 1846.

           124 M       iii.  Luke KINGSMILL 348,349 .

Luke married351  Ann DOBBYN 350  on 2 Sep 1789 in Diocese of Ossory, Queens County.

           125 M       iv.  Anthony KINGSMILL .

 

+       126 M       v.  John KINGSMILL  was born about 1760. He died in 1801.

           127 F        vi.  Sophia KINGSMILL 352 .

Sophia married MCLEAN .

 

+       128 F       vii.  Eleanor ("snr") KINGSMILL .

 

   107. Richard GRENVILLE 353  (Eleanor TEMPLE, Eleanor TYRELL, Eleanor KINGSMILL, William, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1678. He died in 1727.

Richard married Countess Temple Hester TEMPLE 354 . Hester died in 1752.

 

They had the following children:

           129 M        i.  Prime Minister; 2nd Earl TEMPLE, Viscount Cobham Richard GRENVILLE  was born in 1711. He died in 1779 in Stowe, England.

 

+       130 M        ii.  Rt. Hon. George GRENVILLE  was born in 1712. He died in 1770.

 

   111. Dorothy SMYTH 355,356,357  (Dorothy BURGH, Mary KINGSMILL, William, Francis, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born358  about 1685 in Dundrun, Down, Ireland. She died359  in 1766 in Dublin, Ireland.

Dorothy married363  Frances TUCKER 360,361,362  about 1728 in Ireland. Frances was born about 1682 in Dublin, Ireland. He died in 1730.

 

They had the following children:

 

+       131 M        i.  Colonel Martin TUCKER  was born on 29 Oct 1729. He died in 1792.

 

   112. Thomas FORTESCUE  (Chichester FORTESCUE, Sidney KINGSMILL, William, Francis, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1692 in Isle of Man, Britain.

 

 Thomas FORTESCUE of Dromiskin was born about 1692 in Isle of Man. He died on 19 May 1725.

 

Thomas succeeded to his grandfather's estates in Co. Down and Co.

Louth in 1710

 

He was married to Anne GARSTIN of Braganstown (daughter of John GARSTIN) in Sep 1716. Thomas

FORTESCUE of Dromiskin and Anne GARSTIN of Braganstown had the following children:

 

Thomas married Ann GARSTIN  in Sep 1716. Ann was born in Braganstown .

 

They had the following children:

 

+       132 M        i.  Chichester FORTESCUE  was born on 5 Jan 1718. He died on 15 Jun 1757.

           133 M        ii.  John FORTESCUE .

           134 F        iii.  Anne FORTESCUE .

 

   116. Thomas FORTESCUE  (William FORTESCUE, Sidney KINGSMILL, William, Francis, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*).

 

Thomas was employed as MP for Dundalk.

Thomas married Elizabeth HAMILTON  daughter of James HAMILTON and Hon Anne MORDAUNT. Elizabeth died on 15 Sep 1797.

 

They had the following children:

           135 F          i.  Margaret FORTESCUE .

Margaret married Sir, Bart Arthur BROOKE .

 

   117. Elizabeth DUNCH 364,365  (Henry Newington DUNCH, Bridget HUNGERFORD, Elizabeth LUCY, Constance KINGSMILL, Richard, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1671 in Newington, Oxfordshire, England. She died before 1751.

Elizabeth married 5th Baronet of Parham Cecil BISSHOP 366,367 . Cecil was born about 1667 in Parham, Sussex, England. He died on 25 Oct 1725 in Parham, Sussex, England.

 

They had the following children:

 

+       136 M        i.  Fifth Baronet of Parham Cecil BISSHOP  was born about 1692. He died on 15 Jun 1778.

 

   118. Mary LUCY 368  (Berkeley LUCY, Kingsmill LUCY, Richard LUCY, Constance KINGSMILL, Richard, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*).

Mary married Charles COMPTON 369 . Charles was born in 1692. He died in 1755.

 

They had the following children:

 

+       137 F          i.  Elizabeth COMPTON  died in 1819.

           138 M        ii.  Charles COMPTON .

 

   119. Mildred Warner SMITH 370  (John SMITH, Anna BERNARD, Anne CORDRAY, Bridgett GODDARD, Mary KINGSMILL, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born in 1682.

Mildred married Robert PORTEUS 371 . Robert was born about 1679 in Virginia, America. He died in 1758 in Enlgand.

 

Robert and Mildred had the following children:

 

+       139 M        i.  Reverend Robert PORTEUS  was born about 1705. He died in 1754.

 

   120. George MASSEY  (Penelope Ashleigh COOPER, Anthony Ashley COOPER, John COOPER, John COOPER, Jane KINGSMILL, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1669 in Hanover, Virginia, America. He died on 13 Mar 2003.

 

He had the following children:

 

+       140 F          i.  Margery MASSEY  was born about 1705.

 

   121. Mary MONTAGUE 372  (Peter III MONTAGUE, Peter II MONTAGUE, Peter MONTAGUE, Margaret M MALTHOUSE, Margaret BULLOCK, Alice KINGSMILL, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1665 in Virginia, America. She died in 1743 in Virginia, America.

Mary married Colonel Joseph BALL 373 . Joseph was born in 1649. He died in 1711.

 

They had the following children:

 

+       141 F          i.  Mary BALL  was born in 1708. She died in 1789.

 

 

Eleventh Generation

 

   122. Henry* KINGSMILL 374,375,376  (John*, Henry*, Henry*, Anthony*, Anthony*, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born in 1754 in Borris-in-Ossory, Co. Laois, Ireland. He died about 1840.

 

"of Borris"

 

Henry* married378,379  (1) ? WHITE 377  in 1792 in Borris-in-Ossory, Co. Laois, Ireland. ? WHITE was born380  about 1759.

 

Henry* married (2) Mary PALMER . Mary was born about 1777.

 

They had the following children:

 

+       142 F          i.  Frances Sophia KINGSMILL  was born about 1808. She died on 19 Feb 1889.

 

Henry* married (3) Mary* ALLEN .

 

They had the following children:

 

+       143 M        ii.  John Allen* KINGSMILL  was born in 1793. He died on 7 Jul 1869.

 

+       144 M       iii.  Luke KINGSMILL  was born about 1794. He died about 1849.

 

+       145 F        iv.  Letitia KINGSMILL  was born about 1795. She died on 22 May 1874.

 

+       146 M       v.  Henry KINGSMILL  was born in 1802.

 

   123. Thomas snr KINGSMILL 381,382,383,384  (John*, Henry*, Henry*, Anthony*, Anthony*, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born385,386  about 1762 in Ireland. He died387,388  

about 1846 in Ireland.

Thomas married (1) Jane snr PALMER 389,390,391  daughter of Joseph PALMER and Elizabeth BOWES. Jane was born392,393  about 1765 in Ireland.

 

They had the following children:

 

+       147 F          i.  Ellen Kingsmill  was born about 1792.

 

+       148 F         ii.  Jane KINGSMILL  was born about 1794. She died about 1866.

 

+       149 F        iii.  Anne Jane KINGSMILL  was born about 1795. She died on 8 Apr 1836.

           150 M       iv.  Thomas jnr KINGSMILL 394,395,396  was born397  about 1798 in Ireland. He died398  about 1818.

 

1871 Residence Lancashire England

 

           151 F         v.  Celia KINGSMILL 399,400  was born401,402  about 1800 in Ireland.

           152 M       vi.  Rev Henry KINGSMILL 403,404  was born405,406  about 1804 in Ireland.

 

Henry was employed407  as Rector of Cornwall parish in 1851 in Cornwall.

 

1861 Residence Surrey England

 

 

Henry married Ellen Emily BURT  in 1841. Ellen was born ca 18 07 in England, UK.

 

+       153 M      vii.  Rev. Joseph KINGSMILL  was born about 1806. He died in 1866.

 

Thomas married (2) Sarah MEARS .

 

   126. John KINGSMILL 408  (John*, Henry*, Henry*, Anthony*, Anthony*, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1760. He died in 1801.

 

Predeceased his father, father of Eleanor and John.

 

John married Lydia PALMER 409 .

 

They had the following children:

 

+       154 F          i.  Eleanor (jnr) KINGSMILL  was born about 1787. She died on 28 Sep 1873.

           155 M        ii.  John KINGSMILL  was born about 1787.

 

As mentioned in the will of John Kingsmill: "Elenor Kingsmill and John Kingsmill my two

grandchildren." These last two were the children of a son John who had died early

enough to escape his father's wrath and the usual shilling and a penny.

These two grandchildren as mentioned in John Kingsmill's will were left to the care of

their Aunt Eleanor (Abbott) and they could not "marry or cohabit with a papist 'or

papists' under forfeiture of legacy.

 

 

   128. Eleanor ("snr") KINGSMILL 410,411  (John*, Henry*, Henry*, Anthony*, Anthony*, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born in Rathdowney, Queens Co., Ireland.

 

The Rev. T.K. Abbott's grandmother.

 

John bequeathed, one eighth each, to "Eleanor Abbott and Sophia McClean my two daughters" and to "

Elenor Kingsmill and John Kingsmill my two grandchildren." These last two were the children of a son

 

John who had died early enough to escape his father's wrath and the usual shilling and a penny.  John,

like his brother Luke, was owed money by that Rev. "villain" and brother-in-law, John Kean, it was a bond

for £200.  So as the testator himself owed money to Samuel White of Roundwood Esq., and Marmaduke

Grace, late of Dublin, Attorney deceased, he left them to be paid out of John Kean's bond, the balance of

which he left in equal shares to daughter Sophia, and daughter Eleanor's two sons John and Thomas

Abbott.

 

Eleanor married Thomas ("snr") ABBOTT 412,413,414  son of William ABBOTT and Mary GOULDING on 4 Sep 1783 in Queens Co., Ireland. Thomas was born415  about 1760 in Ballinakill, Queens Co., Ireland. He died416  before 1842 in Ireland.

 

Executor, with Thomas White, of his father-in-law John Kingsmill's will.

 

 

Thomas and Eleanor had the following children:

           156 M        i.  John ABBOTT 417  was born in 1801.

 

Born before  the death of their grandfather in 1802, John Kingsmill, as noted in his will.

 

Eleanor Kingsmill (snr):

 

John Kingsmill is described by his grand-daughter as follows:

"John married Eleanor Palmer only sister of Paul Palmer of Derreen.  They had five

sons and two daughters - Henry, Tom, Luke, Anthony and John, Sophia (and) the Rev.

T.K. Abbott's grandmother."

John Kingsmill left and unusual will which contains much information.  He describes

himself as Borris-in-Ossory, Queens Co. 'very weak and feeble of body, but of perfect

sound mind and memory, thanks to God, and knowing that it is appointed for all

mankind once to die." Then, less piously, he states that the death of his brother Luke

entitles him to certain rights and interests.  He leaves his three sons, Luke, Thomas

and Anthony, and his son Harry's son John, to recover these, and gives them each an

eighth share of the proceeds if any: if none, then one shilling and one penny each.  He

gives his son Harry also one shilling and one penny, and parts from all five "hereby

totally cutting them off from receiving any more of my "worldly substance."  John does

not specify in his will the particular right or interest to which he was entitled on the

death of his brother Luke, who had already left him a shilling as a bar against any

demand.  The remainder of this irrecoverable right, John bequeathed, one eighth each,

to "Eleanor Abbott and Sophia McClean my two daughters" and to "Elenor Kingsmill

and John Kingsmill my two grandchildren." These last two were the children of a son

John who had died early enough to escape his father's wrath and the usual shilling and

a penny.  John, like his brother Luke, was owed money by that Rev. "villain" and

brother-in-law, John Kean, it was a bond for £200.  So as the testator himself owed

money to Samuel White of Roundwood Esq., and Marmaduke Grace, late of Dublin,

Attorney deceased, he left them to be paid out of John Kean's bond, the balance of

which he left in equal shares to daughter Sophia, and daughter Eleanor's two sons

John and Thomas Abbott.  Sophia was also left the remainder of the lease of a house

and garden rented from the reverend John.  A sum of £ 200 leviable on land and

Moniamore was distributed to daughter Eleanor Abbott (£ 22.15.0) and her two sons,

John (£ 5) and Thomas (£ 5) and her husband Thomas Abbott (£ 15) the remainder

going to the grandchildren John and Eleanor Kingsmill, already mentioned. These two

grandchildren were left to the care of their Aunt Eleanor (Abbott) and they could not "

marry or cohabit with a papist 'or papists' under forfeiture of legacy.  The executors

were Samuel White of Roundwood and son-in-law Thomas Abbott; witnesses, Simon

Miller, Thomas Whitly and Low (?) Watters.

 

 

John married Unknown .

 

           157 F         ii.  Eleanor ABBOTT 418  was born before 1801.

 

, John bequeathed, one eighth each, to "Eleanor Abbott and Sophia McClean my two

daughters" and to "Elenor Kingsmill and John Kingsmill my two grandchildren." These

last two were the children of a son John who had died early enough to escape his

father's wrath and the usual shilling and a penny.  John, like his brother Luke, was

owed money by that Rev. "villain" and brother-in-law, John Kean, it was a bond for

£200.  So as the testator himself owed money to Samuel White of Roundwood Esq.,

and Marmaduke Grace, late of Dublin, Attorney deceased, he left them to be paid out

of John Kean's bond, the balance of which he left in equal shares to daughter Sophia,

and daughter Eleanor's two sons John and Thomas Abbott.

 

 

+       158 M       iii.  Joseph ABBOTT  was born after 1801.

 

+       159 M       iv.  Thomas ABBOTT  was born after 1801.

 

+       160 M       v.  Henry Kingsmill ABBOTT  was born about 1807. He died on 7 Dec 1842.

 

   130. Rt. Hon. George GRENVILLE  (Richard GRENVILLE, Eleanor TEMPLE, Eleanor TYRELL, Eleanor KINGSMILL, William, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born in 1712. He died in 1770.

George married Elizabetjh WYNDHAM .

 

They had the following children:

 

+       161 M        i.  K.G., 1st Marquess of BUCKINGHAM George NUGENT-TEMPLE-GRENVILLE  was born in 1753. He died in 1813.

 

   131. Colonel Martin TUCKER 419,420  (Dorothy SMYTH, Dorothy BURGH, Mary KINGSMILL, William, Francis, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born421  on 29 Oct 1729 in Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. He died in 1792.

Martin married424  Henrietta BAKER 422,423  daughter of John BAKER and Bushe about 1777 in Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. Henrietta was born425  about 1735 in Dromkeen, Limerick, Ireland.

 

They had the following children:

 

+       162 F          i.  Mary TUCKER  was born about 1778. She died after 1844.

 

   132. Chichester FORTESCUE  (Thomas FORTESCUE, Chichester FORTESCUE, Sidney KINGSMILL, William, Francis, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born on 5 Jan 1718 in Lonmay, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. He was christened on 26 Jun 1718. He died on 15 Jun 1757 in Dangan.

 

 Chichester FORTESCUE was born on 5 Jan 1718 in Lonmay, Aberdeenshire. He was christened on 26

Jun 1718. He died on 15 Jun 1757 in Dangan. IGI has 16 July 1757 at Dangan Chichester served as

High Sheriff of Down in 1744. He was M.P. for Trim to the Irish Parliament from 15th October 1747 until

his death. He was one of 124 MPs presented with gold medals for a popular and patriotic vote on 17th

December 1754. The vote rejected the King's claim to a surplus of £300,000 in the Irish treasury, and

insisted that it should be used for the benefit of Ireland.

 

He was married to Hon Elizabeth WELLESLEY of Dublin (daughter of Richard WELLESLEY 1st Lord

 

Mornington and Elizabeth SALE) on 9 Apr 1743. Hon Elizabeth WELLESLEY of Dublin (658) was born

about 1716 in Dublin. She died on 10 Oct 1752.

 

Chichester married Hon Elizabeth WELLESLEY  daughter of 1st Baron  Mornington Richard WELLESLEY and Elizabeth SALE.

 

They had the following children:

 

+       163 M        i.  Thomas FORTESCUE  was born on 1 May 1744. He died on 16 Jun 1778.

           164 M        ii.  Richard FORTESCUE .

           165 M       iii.  Sir Chichester FORTESCUE .

           166 M       iv.  Gerald FORTESCUE .

           167 F         v.  Elizabeth FORTESCUE .

 

   136. Fifth Baronet of Parham Cecil BISSHOP 426,427  (Elizabeth DUNCH, Henry Newington DUNCH, Bridget HUNGERFORD, Elizabeth LUCY, Constance KINGSMILL, Richard, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1692 in Parham, Suffolk, England. He died on 15 Jun 1778.

Cecil married Hon. Anne BOSCAWEN 428,429  daughter of 1st Viscount Falmouth Hugh BOSCAWEN and Charlotte GODFREY. Anne was born on 17 Feb 1704 in Tregothnan, Corn., England. She died on 11 May 1749 in Parham, Sussex, England.

 

They had the following children:

 

+       168 F          i.  Anne BISSHOP  was born in 1728. She died in 1803.

 

   137. Elizabeth COMPTON 430  (Mary LUCY, Berkeley LUCY, Kingsmill LUCY, Richard LUCY, Constance KINGSMILL, Richard, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) died in 1819.

Elizabeth married Henry DRUMMOND 431 .

 

They had the following children:

 

+       169 M        i.  Henry DRUMMOND  was born in 1762. He died in 1794.

 

   139. Reverend Robert PORTEUS 432  (Mildred Warner SMITH, John SMITH, Anna BERNARD, Anne CORDRAY, Bridgett GODDARD, Mary KINGSMILL, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1705 in Virginia, America. He died in 1754 in Virginia, America.

 

Robert was employed as Rector of Cockayne (Porteous).

Robert married Judith COCKAYNE 433 . Judith was born about 1702. She died in 1782.

 

They had the following children:

 

+       170 F          i.  Mildred PORTEUS  was born in 1744. She died about 1815.

 

   140. Margery MASSEY  (George MASSEY, Penelope Ashleigh COOPER, Anthony Ashley COOPER, John COOPER, John COOPER, Jane KINGSMILL, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1705 in Hanover, Virginia, America.

Margery married Benjamin JOHNSON  in 1725 in Virginia, America. Benjamin was born

 

about 1701 in Virginia, America. He died in 1739 in Virginia, America.

 

They had the following children:

 

+       171 M        i.  Gideon JOHNSON  was born on 11 Oct 1717. He died in 1807.

 

   141. Mary BALL 434  (Mary MONTAGUE, Peter III MONTAGUE, Peter II MONTAGUE, Peter MONTAGUE, Margaret M MALTHOUSE, Margaret BULLOCK, Alice KINGSMILL, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born in 1708. She died in 1789.

Mary married Augustine WASHINGTON 435  son of Lawrence WASHINGTON and Mildred WARNER. Augustine was born about 1694 in Virginia, America. He died in 1743 in Ferry Farm, , King George, Virginia.

 

They had the following children:

           172 M        i.  1st President of the United States George Augustine WASHINGTON 436  was born in 1732 in Virginia, America. He died in 1799 in Virginia, America.

 

 

Twelfth Generation

 

   142. Frances Sophia KINGSMILL 437  (Henry*, John*, Henry*, Henry*, Anthony*, Anthony*, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1808 in Ireland. She died438  on 19 Feb 1889 in 64 Young Street Redfern NSW, Australia.

Frances married William John PELHAM 439  son of George PELHAM and Elizabeth in Jun 1851 in San Francisco, California, USA. William was born about 1825. He died440  in 1884 in Camperdown, Newtown, NSW, Australia.

 

They had the following children:

           173 M        i.  George PELHAM .

           174 F         ii.  Eliza Isabella Crowe PELHAM .

           175 M       iii.  Francis Clinton PELHAM .

           176 F        iv.  Elizabeth Ann PELHAM .

           177 M       v.  Henry Kingsmill PELHAM .

           178 M       vi.  Albert Richardson PELHAM .

           179 M      vii.  Arthur W J PELHAM .

 

   143. John Allen* KINGSMILL 441,442  (Henry*, John*, Henry*, Henry*, Anthony*, Anthony*, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born443  in 1793 in Borris-in-Ossory,Co. Laois, Ireland. He died444,445,446  on 7 Jul 1869 in Lawes Street, East Maitland, NSW, Australia.

 

He emigrated450  on 29 Oct 1824 from Cork, Ireland. He was employed451  as Government Service (Elijah Lane [district] of Evan) in 1825 in Sydney, NSW, Australia. He immigrated452  on 22 Feb 1825 to Sydney, NSW, Australia. He was employed453  as School Master, Carters Barracks on 16 Mar 1826 in Sydney, NSW, Australia. He was employed456  as Sheriff's

Deputy in 1833 in Maitland, Aust, NSW, Australia. He was employed458  as First Secretary of Hospital Board/Building Committee/Collector in 1847 in Maitland, Aust, NSW, Australia. He was employed459  as Appointed to Local School Board. Denominational School on 12 May 1849 in East Maitland. He was employed460  as On Board of Church of England School on 15 Jan 1851 in Maitland, Aust, NSW, Australia. He was employed461  as Commissioner for Road Trust in 1854 in Maitland, Aust, NSW, Australia. He was employed462  as Member of District Council in 1855 in Maitland, Aust, NSW, Australia.

 

John Allen Kingsmill (1794 ~ 1869), who was born in Ireland to Henry Kingsmill and his third wife Mary

(nee Allen), is descended from the Irish Kingsmills.

 

When John was about 28 years of age he was a Sergeant with the Royal Irish Constabulary. At this time,

his father Henry was a Chelsea Pensioner and agent to Luke, Henry's brother who was Sub Sheriff of

Killieugr when his cousin Flood was High Sheriff. On the 12th August 1823 a team of police of the IRC,

headed by John, became involved in a fight with Richard McDaniel, a patron of a Bride Street public

house in Ballinakill, who was mortally wounded, with one of the police injured.

 

John Kingsmill, Robert Bolton, Robert Harvey, George Walpole, James Hincks, and John Owen, were

indicted for the Wilful Murder of Richard McDaniel on the 12th day of August last (1823). The hearing

was held before Judge Moore at the Marysborough Queens County Assizes on March 25th 1824.

 

Judge Moore, presiding over the case, explained the law on the subject to the jurors, showing the

distinction between wilful and deliberate murder, manslaughter, and homicide in self-defence. The Jury

retired for about half an hour, when they acquitted the prisoners of murder, and found them Guilty of

Manslaughter. Kingsmill, Harvey, and Bolton, to be transported for life; Walpole and Hinks to be

transported for fourteen years; and Owens to be transported for seven years. John's father Henry

petitioned on his behalf on 22nd April 1824.

 

Raised in court this day in another case was a complaint that whilst awaiting trial, the police prisoners

were permitted the freedom of the gaol. The head Gaoler advised the courts that:

 

''the police charged with murder were allowed to go at large about the gaol ....with the authority was a

letter from the High-Sheriff....''

 

There is no doubt that John undertook his courtship with his future wife, Mary Johnston(e)e, whilst a

prisoner awaiting trial.

 

John's father Henry petitioned for his pardon shortly after the case, stating that he was a resident of

Banis Co. Donegal and ''I have been in the army for 48 Years''.

 

John Kingsmill was transported to Australia/New South Wales from Ireland in 1825 aboard the ''Asia I''.

Asia I sailed from Cork on 29th October 1824 and arrived in Sydney on 22nd February 1825.

 

On 18th July 1825 Mary Johnston(e) arrived in Australia/New South Wales as a free government

passenger on the ship ''Mariner'', a female convict ship, from Ireland and married John on the 8th August

1825 at St Phillip's Church of England Church Sydney, with permission granted by the Colonial Secretary

four days later.

 

The banns of marriage of the Church of England are required to be posted in church for three several

Sundays (which may be consecutive Sundays) within three months prior to marriage within the parish

where the couple are living. It would appear that John and Mary had their wedding banns posted the first

Sunday following Mary's arrival in Australia, being 21 days from her arrival day until the day of their

marriage, and therefore also it is likely that they must have become engaged prior to coming to Australia.

It might have been a long engagement though. As Mary arrived in Sydney on 18th July 1825, we can

assume that she resided in the same parish as John for 3 consecutive Sundays prior to their marriage on

 

8th August 1825, and the banns would only have been published/called in Sydney.

 

John received a Conditional Pardon dated 26th October 1827, not four years into his life sentence. On

this same day Bolton, Harvey, Walpole, Hincks and Owen also received their pardons.

 

John was appointed School Master of boys at the Carters Barracks, also credited with contributing to

writing of education manuals. The Carters Barracks model continues to used for reference in

development of ''Young Offenders'' programs and is a forerunner of the modern technical training

institutions.

 

(See history of Carters Barracks: NSW Archives; Archives Investigator)

 

In May 1826 a ''Mrs Kingsmill'', who we can be reasonably assured was Mary, was appointed Matron of

the ''Female School of Industry'', a benevolent church-rooted organisation run by entirely by the eminent

ladies of Sydney for the training of convict women as house-servants, and acted as an agency for the

provision of wives for the colonists. The school was a particular consuming interest for the Governor's

wife, Eliza Darling.

 

In 1826 Mary and John's first child, Mary Ann was born, and on 28th September 1827 Sophia Letitia was

born. On the 18th May 1828 Mary died aged 27 and was buried in the cemetery adjoining Carters

Barracks where Sydney Central Railway Station now stands, and later exhumed and moved to another

cemetery, as many graves were.

 

John was left with two small children and according to the 1828 Census Mary Ann, 2 years, and Sophia

Letitia, 2 months, were in the care of the Rev. R. Hill of Castlereagh Street, Sydney.

 

Other extended but closely related members of the family had also come out from Ireland during this time,

many of them in the capacity of solicitors and barristers, and in government employ such as

Commissioner for Lands (The Kingsmill, O'Meagher, Allen and Abbott families).

 

In 1829 John married Ann Driscoll at St James Church of England, Sydney. Anne left John early 1830,

but apparently they reconciled, with their first son Henry being born in 1831. A second son John was

born in 1833, Luke in 1835, Walter in 1836 and Robert in 1840.

 

John was appointed Sheriffs Bailiff in Maitland, as records of the Colonial secretaries 'Returns of the

Colony' show in 1833, having moved to the Maitland area and settling in East Maitland, whilst his brother

Henry, having arrived from Ireland, was the Sheriffs Bailiff in Sydney.

 

From the time of his move to Maitland and throughout, John became closely associated with local

community, government and church in Maitland. He was strongly community minded and a well regarded

citizen, particularly active in promoting community concerns and activities, in politics, as a community

advocate for roads and bridges, to organising committees for church fundraisers and regattas, as well as

secretary of many committees and in his position as a church warden.

 

John took over the cause of the East Maitland Benevolent Society, a cottage rented by Caroline

Chisholm at 1 and 3 Smith's Row (Mill Street) East Maitland who converted it into a single cottage to

shelter homeless immigrants in the district.At present it is the only known building to still survive that was

associated with Caroline Chisholm, and one of the oldest buildings in the district. He formed a committee,

applied for government funding, also raising community funds through various events, to enable the

building of Maitland's first hospital, and was it's first secretary, a position his son Luke was to later take

on.

 

In 1842 he was also a founding member and treasurer of the Maitland Jockey Club. John's sons

continued to do well at school achieving awards for History, Latin and in Scripture classes.

 

In 1844 Henry, John's eldest son, died at age 13.

 

 

By 1846, Anne had left John again (notice in MM 10/01/1846), it being a quite acrimonious separation.

There are several references to some wild behaviour from his wife, who had left him again, with a notice

by John in the Maitland Mercury in 1846 'Giving notice that he would not be responsible for debts

incurred by his wife', in 1847 'Accused his wife of maliciously damaging several trees on his property' and

in 1849 'Wife Ann committed for trial for stealing a table from Kingsmill's verandah'.

 

Some time later, with increasing maintenance payments to his wife, enforced retirement due to ill health

combined with mounting debts, John was forced to sell his house with money received from the sale not

meeting the mortgage costs, and was finally made insolvent on 15/5/1866.

 

He died aged 75 in 1869. John is buried with his son Henry and wife Anne, with other family members in

a chest tomb at the historic Old Glebe cemetery, East Maitland.

 

 

 

Obituary: Maitland Mercury 10th July 1869

 

Maitland Mercury: 10th July 1869

 

DEATH OF MR JOHN KINGSMILL ~ our readers will have observed that on Wednesday last Mr. John

Kingsmill died, in East Maitland. He had reached the advanced age of 75 years. Our present townsmen

have known Mr. Kingsmill only as a gradually failing, infirm old man, but many will remember him a fine,

erect, stalwart man, the life and pleasure of any society into which he was thrown. Back in the terrible

days of 1842, 3, 4, cirmcumstances made Mr. Kingsmill a power in the district. The sheriff's bailiff was

then one of the most active and most dreaded of our officials. But so far from maintaining the traditional

hard character of such an officer, Mr. Kingsmill was the kindest man who had ever performed these

unpleasant duties. Always vigilant and efficient in duty, he had a warm and feeling heart, and perhaps no

man in Maitland had a wider circle of attached and loving friends. Of late years growing infirmities

occasioned first his resignation of the office, and gradually his retirement from all public affairs ~ in which,

in his days of vigour, he took a fair share, although, like many men of good conversational powers he

was a very poor speech-maker.

 

***

The Bride Street Ballinakill, Public House incident:

 

John Kingsmill was a Sergeant of a troop of RIC men who were acting under the magistrates orders to

clear the public houses at 10 o’clock at night.

 

''The Magistrates had caused general instructions to be issued to the police, to clear all public-houses of

their visitors at ten o'clock at night, and that acting in pursuance of those instructions, they had entered

Fitzpatrick's house on the night the deceased lost his life; that he had refused to obey the order of the

police on that night and that in consequence, an altercation and struggle ensued between him and

Kingsmill; that some countrymen, who were in the house, took part with the deceased, which caused a

general fight between them and the police, and that, in the quarrel, the deceased lost his life.''

 

In the Bride Street Pub of Ballinakill, Kingsmill told a drunken McDaniel to leave but he refused to go and

became quite fiesty. When Kingsmill left the room, one of Kingsmill’s RIC men, a young weedy chap by

all accounts, was attacked by the drunken McDaniel, with McDaniel pinning him down on the floor,

whereupon the other RIC men ran to his aid. McDaniel became quite violent and nearly killed the lad,

whereupon the police retaliating by attacking McDaniel with knives. The subsequent melee resulted in

one of the RIC men being mortally wounded and McDaniel killed. As the Sgt. in charge of the unit,

Kingsmill was held responsible. In Queens county at that time, there was a lot of patriotic sentiment that

 

was easily inflamed, as we know which was in the lead up to “the troubles.” The pub was owned by a

Lalor clansmen, and any Australian should be well versed in the story of this family and their political

machinations! I would urge you to recheck the NSW Archives where you will find the records where each

of the RIC men, John Kingsmill, Robert Bolton, Robert Harvey, George Walpole, James Hincks, and

John Owen, were given a conditional pardon on the same day by the Governor of NSW on the advice of

the Irish authorities, a couple of years after they reached NSW. Each man was absorbed into the new

colony with government assistance. I can’t help but think that the whole affair was done to appease the

tensions of the Irish countrymen. (You find that this is what the authorities did in the case following the

death of my Thomas Allen in Ireland) One of the Hincks’s son became mayor of Ryde, amongst other

things. John Kingsmill was a staunch and benevolent Christian, and a member of the temperance

movement, and quite “Presbyterian” in his habits. A scan his record for arrests made for “drunken and

disorderly” when Sheriff’s Bailiff in Maitland would attest to his zeal.

 

REFERENCES:

 

An Overview of Juvenile Detention in Australia, Atkinson, Lynn www.aic.gov.au/publications/proceedings/

25/atkinson.pdf

 

Brian Fletcher, Ralph Darling: A Governor Maligned, Oxford University Press, Melbourne, 1984, chapter:

''Female School of Industry''

 

Burke, Sir Bernard A genealogical and heraldic history of the landed gentry of Great Britain and Ireland:

C B LLD Volume 1 Eighth Edition 1894

 

Church of England Information http://www.cofe.anglican.org/lifeevents/weddings/weddingbanns.html

 

Colonial Secretary Returns of the Colony; various

 

Free Settler or Felon?; Maitland Hospital http://www.jenwilletts.com/maitland_hospital1.htm

 

Free Settler or Felon?; Search Archives http://www.jenwilletts.com/search.htm

 

Government Gazette: various

 

Hunter River Guardian; various

 

Kingsmill John Asia I (3) [1825] 1824 Maryborough (Port Laoise) Queens Co Life 1798 Queens Co http://

members.pcug.org.au/~ppmay/cgi-bin/db/search.cgi?query=Asia+I+(3)+[1825]&stpos=90&stype=AND

 

Library Ireland: Principle Families of Ulster: Tirconnell http://www.libraryireland.com/Pedigrees1/

Tirconnell.php

 

Maitland Mercury; various

 

Mayberry, Peter: Irish Convicts to Australia 1791 ~ 1834

 

Mitchell Library, Special Collections, State Library of NSW, Macquarie Street, Sydney NSW.

 

National Archives of Australia http://www.naa.gov.au/

 

NSW Archives http://www.records.nsw.gov.au/

 

Report 104: Young Offenders, NSW Law Reform Commission www.lawlink.nsw.gov.au

 

The Connaught Journal http://www.irelandoldnews.com/Galway/1824/APR.html

 

White, William: Kingsclere ~ Heritage and Genealogy, Sydmonton and Ecchinswell in 1859 (from

Gazetteer and Directory of Hampshire and the Isle of Wight ~ 1859) http://www.kingsclere.org.uk/syd-ech

-1859.html

 

Worth, William M: Descendants of Richard Kingsmill http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~worths/

 

brown/richardkingsmill.html

 

 Government Notice.

 

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICF, 16th MARCH, 1826. THE GOVERNOR has been pleased to

appoint John Kingsmill, Schoolmaster at the Carters Barracks ; and William Brown, to be Principal

Overseer of the same, in the Room of John Burke.

 

By His Excellency's Command, ,

 

ALEXANDER M'LEAY.

 

***

 

 DISTRICT COUNCIL.

 

His Excellency the Governor General directs it to be notified, that a letter has been received from the

Warden of the District of Maitland, certifying the return ot the undermentioned gentlemen to serve as

Members of the District Council of Maitland, viz. :-Messrs. Patrick, Walsh, James Portas, and John

Kingsmill.

 

***

 

When John was about 28 years of age he was a Sergeant with the Royal Irish Constabulary. At this time,

his father Henry was a Chelsea Pensioner and agent to Luke, Henry's brother who was Sub Sheriff of

Killieugr when his cousin Flood was High Sheriff. On the 12th August 1823 a team of police of the RIC,

headed by John, became involved in a fight with Richard McDaniel, a patron of a Bride Street public

house in Ballinakill, who was mortally wounded, with one of the police injured.

 

John married (1) Mary* JOHNSTON  on 8 Aug 1825 in St Philips Church of England, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Mary* was born about 1801 in ?Ireland. She died in May 1828 in Carters Barracks, Sydney, NSW, Australia. She was buried on 18 May 1828 in Sandhills Cemetery (??? headstone removed to Rookwood).

 

Mary* immigrated464  on 18 Jul 1825 to Sydney, Australia. She was employed465  as Matron of Female School of Industry after 18 Jul 1825 in Female School of Industry near Carters Barracks.

 

Mary Johnston, b. ca. 1801, arrived in Australia as a Government Passenger on 18/7/1825 on the "

Mariner"  from Ireland (a women's convict ship) under the name Mary Johnstone, and was married to

John Allen Kingsmill 8th August 1825 by Banns two weeks after her arrival, by the Rev. William Cowper

at St Philip's Church of England Sydney, and died in 1828 aged 27. The ship's master, William Fotherly,

was witness at the marriage, as was Thomas Taber, another Schoolmaster.  Mary died at Carters

Barracks, where John was School Master, and was buried at Sandhills Cemetery (where Central Station

now stands) on 18th May 1828 by Rev. Richard Hill. She was matron of the "Female School of Industry"

(nearby where Central Station is located nowadays) under the patronage and direction of the Governor's

wife Eliza Darling et al. They had two daughters, Mary Ann Kingsmill and Sophia Kingsmill (my ancestor).

The girls went into the care of the Rev. Hill and his wife, a colonial "evangelical" and dynamic Anglican

chaplain, a childless couple, for a time following their mother's death, as they were only quite young.  I

can only guess that Mary Johnston was engaged to John Kingsmill before leaving Ireland, he coming

from County Laois.

 

 

John and Mary* had the following children:

 

+       180 F          i.  Mary Ann KINGSMILL  was born on 17 Aug 1826. She died on 6 Apr 1909.

 

+       181 F         ii.  Sophia Letitia* KINGSMILL  was born on 28 Sep 1827. She died on 5 Mar 1874.

 

John married (2) Anne DRISCOLL 466  daughter of Walter DRISCOLL and Helena on 8 Jul 1829 in C of E Sydney, St James. Anne was born on 8 Jul 1809. She died467  on 10 Jun 1873 in Maitland, NSW, Australia.

 

They had the following children:

           182 M       iii.  Henry KINGSMILL  was born on 22 Jun 1831 in Maitland, NSW, Australia. He died on 5 Jun 1844 in Maitland, NSW, Australia.

           183 M       iv.  John Allen KINGSMILL  was born on 17 May 1833 in Maitland, NSW, Australia.

 

+       184 M       v.  Luke KINGSMILL  was born on 23 May 1835. He died on 13 Feb 1859.

           185 M       vi.  Walter KINGSMILL  was born on 24 Apr 1836 in Maitland West, NSW, Australia. He died on 5 Nov 1889 in Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.

 

+       186 M      vii.  Robert Goodbody KINGSMILL  was born on 20 Feb 1839. He died about 1880.

           187 F      viii.  Helena Maria Anne KINGSMILL  was born on 25 Dec 1840 in Maitland, NSW, Australia.

Helena married468  George HAWKINS  about 1864 in Maitland, NSW, Australia.

 

   144. Luke KINGSMILL  (Henry*, John*, Henry*, Henry*, Anthony*, Anthony*, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1794. He died about 1849 in Castlebellingham, Louth, Ireland.

Luke married Catherine ABBOTT 469  daughter of William ABBOTT and FOLINGSBY about 1818 in Ireland. Catherine was born470,471  about 1800 in Hollypark, Ireland. She died472  about 1868 in Ireland.

 

They had the following children:

           188 M        i.  William Henry KINGSMILL  was born about 1819 in Belfast, Ireland.

 

+       189 M        ii.  Arthur John KINGSMILL  was born about 1821. He died on 31 Oct 1902.

           190 M       iii.  William Thomas KINGSMILL  was born about 1825. He died in 1902.

           191 F        iv.  Emily KINGSMILL  was born about 1829.

 

   145. Letitia KINGSMILL 473  (Henry*, John*, Henry*, Henry*, Anthony*, Anthony*, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born about 1795 in Ireland. She died on 22 May 1874 in West Maitland. She was buried in Glebe Cemetery, East Maitland, NSW, Australia.

Letitia married Joseph O'MEAGHER 474,475  son of William O'MEAGHER. Joseph was born about 1790 in Ireland. He died on 26 Mar 1871 in Maitland NSW. He was buried in Glebe Cemetery, East Maitland, NSW, Australia.

 

They had the following children:

 

+       192 F          i.  Marianna O'MEAGHER  was born about 1835. She died about 1914.

 

+       193 M        ii.  Henry O'MEAGHER  died on 24 Sep 1879.

 

           194 F        iii.  Mary Lydia O'MEAGHER  died about 1941 in Coonamble, NSW, Australia.

Mary married Henry Edward BROWNE  about 1862 in Maitland NSW.

           195 F        iv.  Letitia O'MEAGHER  died about 1911 in Newcastle, NSW, Australia.

           196 M       v.  Joseph O'MEAGHER  died about 1911 in Granville, NSW, Australia.

 

+       197 M       vi.  John Kingsmill O'MEAGHER  was born about 1847. He died about 1881.

 

   146. Henry KINGSMILL 476,477  (Henry*, John*, Henry*, Henry*, Anthony*, Anthony*, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born478  in 1802 in Borris-in-Ossory, Co. Laois, Ireland.

 

 

Henry and Elizabeth Kingsmill arrived in Australia on 24 August 1829 as settlers from England aboard

the 209-ton Amethyst, which left Liverpool on 23 March 1829. He was appointed Gaoler at Parramatta

Female Factory on 14 Dec 1830, Bailiff of Sydney on 1 July 1834 and Bailiff of Muswellbrook on 20 Aug

1838. In the 1841 Census he is noted as a Merchant Clerk at East Maitland.  On 26 Sep 1830 Henry

made an unsuccessful application for a land grant at Parramatta, which was rejected on the grounds that

he was an employee of the Crown. He continued to appeal against the decision until 21 Aug 1832.

 

Henry married482,483  Elizabeth BUDDS 479,480,481  daughter of William BUDDS and ? (BUDDS) in 1826 in Co. Laois, Ireland. Elizabeth was born484  about 1806 in Maryborough, Co. Laois, Ireland.

 

 

They had the following children:

           198 M        i.  John Allen KINGSMILL 485  was born about 1827. He died about 1828 in Ireland.

 

+       199 F         ii.  Francis Sophia KINGSMILL  was born about 1827. She died on 19 Feb 1889.

 

+       200 M       iii.  Henry Edward KINGSMILL  was born on 26 Oct 1829. He died on 1 Jun 1915.

           201 F        iv.  Anna M KINGSMILL  was born about 1831 in NSW, Australia. She died about 1876 in Maitland, NSW, Australia.

Anna married Robert P BROWNE  about 1854 in C of E, Black Creek, Bulwarra, Cloden, East Maitland, Hinton, Hunter District, Maitland, Morpeth, West Maitland.

 

+       202 F         v.  Kate KINGSMILL  was born on 22 Mar 1834.

           203 F        vi.  Isabella KINGSMILL 486  was born on 25 Jul 1836 in Muswellbrook,NSW,Australia. She was christened on 19 Dec 1841 in Rowan Or Aberdeen Or, Althorpe-Durham, NSW, Australia.

 

Isabella emigrated in 1850 from May have gone to San Francisco, Calif. in 1850.

 

   147. Ellen Kingsmill 487,488,489  (Thomas snr, John*, Henry*, Henry*, Anthony*, Anthony*, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born490,491  about 1792.

Ellen married George LODGE 492  son of George Frederick LODGE and Mary PHILLIPS. George was born493  about 1790 in Graigavoice, Queens, Ireland. He died494  in Jun 1823 in

 

Dublin, Ireland.

 

George died at a relatively young age and his daughter Caroline was raised by her uncle Richard

Frederick Lodge who lived on the old family estate of "Prospect".

 

 

George and Ellen had the following children:

 

+       204 F          i.  Caroline LODGE  was born about 1819.

 

   148. Jane KINGSMILL 495,496,497,498  (Thomas snr, John*, Henry*, Henry*, Anthony*, Anthony*, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born499,500  about 1794. She died about 1866.

Jane married Joseph ABBOTT 501  son of Thomas ("snr") ABBOTT and Eleanor ("snr") KINGSMILL. Joseph was born502  after 1801.

 

Born after the death of his grandfather, John Kingsmill.

"John bequeathed, one eighth each, to "Eleanor Abbott and Sophia McClean my two daughters" and to "

Elenor Kingsmill and John Kingsmill my two grandchildren." These last two were the children of a son

John who had died early enough to escape his father's wrath and the usual shilling and a penny.  John,

like his brother Luke, was owed money by that Rev. "villain" and brother-in-law, John Kean, it was a bond

for £200.  So as the testator himself owed money to Samuel White of Roundwood Esq., and Marmaduke

Grace, late of Dublin, Attorney deceased, he left them to be paid out of John Kean's bond, the balance of

which he left in equal shares to daughter Sophia, and daughter Eleanor's two sons John and Thomas

Abbott."

 

 

Joseph and Jane had the following children:

 

+       205 M        i.  Rev Thomas Kingsmill ABBOTT  was born in 1839. He died in Dec 1913.

 

   149. Anne Jane KINGSMILL 503,504  (Thomas snr, John*, Henry*, Henry*, Anthony*, Anthony*, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born505,506  about 1795. She died507  on 8 Apr 1836.

Anne married Joshua FINLAY 508 . Joshua was born509  about 1788 in Ireland. He died510  on 29 Nov 1898 in Rathdowney Queens County, Ireland.

 

Joshua was employed511  as RIC Sgt of Police in 1812 in Ireland.

 

They had the following children:

           206 M        i.  Thomas Kingsmill FINLAY 512  was born513  about 1813 in Queens County, Ireland. He died514  on 7 Dec 1861.

 

+       207 M        ii.  William Kingsmill FINLAY  was born about 1815. He died after Nov 1866.

           208 M       iii.  John Kingsmill FINLAY 515  was born516  about 1818. He died517  on 6 Apr 1896.

 

After coming to America he spent some time in Kentucky and then to Kittanning where

he met and married Eliza Jane Brown a cousin and 25 years younger. They had 6

children all born in Kittanning. Four were deaf mutes. He and all his Family in Ireland

were FINLAY The name changed to FINLEY in the US.

 

 

John married Eliza Jane BROWN . Eliza was born on 11 Nov 1843 in Armstrong Co., PA, USA.

 

           209 F        iv.  Jane FINLAY 518  was born519  about 1820.

           210 F         v.  Eliza FINLAY 520  was born521  on 19 Feb 1833 in Queens County, Ireland.

           211 F        vi.  Margaret Jane FINLAY 522  was born523  about 1834.

           212 F       vii.  Susan FINLAY 524  was born525  about 1835.

           213 F      viii.  Maria FINLAY 526  was born527  about 1836 in Queens County, Ireland. She died528  on 18 Sep 1913 in Rathdowney Queens County, Ireland. She was buried529  in Donaghmore, Rathdowney, Queens Co., Ireland.

 

Remained unmarried

 

 

   153. Rev. Joseph KINGSMILL 530,531,532,533  (Thomas snr, John*, Henry*, Henry*, Anthony*, Anthony*, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born534,535,536,537,538  about 1806 in Kilkenny Ireland. He died in 1866.

 

Joseph was ordained539  Joseph Kingsmill entered 22 Mar 1832 as Curate on 22 Mar 1832 in Lyham & Bispham, Lancashire. He was employed540  as Clerk in 1841 in Appleton, Cheshire, England. He resided541  in 1841 in Appleton. He was employed542  as Chaplain, Clergyman CofE in 1851 in Pentonville Prison. He resided in 1851 in Islington, Middlesex, England. He resided543  in 1861 in Streatham, Surrey, England. He was employed544  as Clergyman (without cure of souls) in 1861 in Streatham, Surrey, England.

 

1861 Living in Surrey England

 

Prison Chaplain

 

Joseph married Margaret Thomas BURT 545  daughter of Mr BURT. Margaret was born546,547  about 1814 in London, Middlesex, England.

 

They had the following children:

 

+       214 F          i.  Caroline KINGSMILL  was born about 1838.

           215 M        ii.  Thomas KINGSMILL  was born548  about 1840 in Appleton, Cheshire, England.

 

Thomas was employed549  as Clerk in Convict Service in 1851 in Streatham, Surrey, England.

           216 M       iii.  Andrew KINGSMILL 550,551  was born552  about 1842 in Appleton, Cheshire, England.

 

Andrew was employed as Clerk in General Post Office in 1851 in Streatham, Surrey, England.

Andrew married Edith ELGOOD 553 .

           217 M       iv.  Henry Charles KINGSMILL 554  was born about 1843 in Ireland.

 

Henry was employed555  as Bankers Clerk in 1871 in Eastcote, Middlesex, England.

Henry married Millie CHRISTIE 556 .

           218 F         v.  Margaret KINGSMILL 557  was born558  about 1846 in Ulington, Middlesex, England.

Margaret married560  Thomas Davey BROWN 559  son of Rev Thomas BROWN on 1 Oct 1869 in St Leonard's Church, Streatham.

 

 

+       219 M       vi.  Rev. Joseph Thomas KINGSMILL  was born about 1847. He died in 1931.

           220 F       vii.  Ellen J KINGSMILL 561  was born562  about 1852 in Ulington, Middlesex, England.

 

   154. Eleanor (jnr) KINGSMILL  "(junior)"563,564,565,566,567  (John, John*, Henry*, Henry*, Anthony*, Anthony*, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born568,569,570,571  about 1787 in Borris-in-Ossory, Queens Co., Ireland. She died572,573  on 28 Sep 1873 in Sydney, NSW, Australia.

 

Eleanor immigrated574  in 1838 to NSW, Australia.

 

As mentioned in the will of John Kingsmill: "Elenor Kingsmill and John Kingsmill my two grandchildren."

These last two were the children of a son John who had died early enough to escape his father's wrath

and the usual shilling and a penny.

 

These two grandchildren as mentioned in John Kingsmill's will were left to the care of their Aunt Eleanor

(Abbott) and they could not "marry or cohabit with a papist 'or papists' under forfeiture of legacy.

 

Eleanor married580,581  Thomas ("jnr") ABBOTT 575,576,577,578,579  son of Jonathon ABBOTT and Martha on 16 Oct 1803 in Ireland. Thomas was born582,583  about 1774 in Broadford, Co. Clare, Ireland. He died584,585  on 9 May 1855 in Sydney, NSW, Australia.

 

Thomas immigrated586  on 30 Jan 1838 to Strathfieldsay  with family. He was employed587  as Appointed Keeper of Debtors Prison, Carters Barracks on 1 Jun 1838 in Sydney, NSW, Australia.

 

John Armstrong Green from his website "Hot Properties":

"Thomas Abbott had 5 siblings: John Abbott of Maryborough; Joseph Abbott who married Jane Kingsmill

in 1836 who died in 1866; Henry Kingsmill Abbott, who married Martha Ann Lahoy, daughter of Captain

Lahoy[sic - should be Lefroy] (nb probably incorrect); Thomas Abbott; and, Eleanor Abbott.

 

In 1838, Thomas Palmer Abbott and his wife, Eleanor Kingsmill, with their six sons and two daughters,

arrived in Sydney, with nephews and cousins arriving with them, or in the next few years after that date.

They settled for the most part in what is now the northern part of the Sate of New South Wales.

 

Thomas Palmer Abbott, the head of the Abbott family and direct descendant of John `God be with us`

Abbott, the Ironside and Puritan, who settled Ireland in about 1654-1656 with his wife, Eleanor, was a

descendant of Sir Edward Kingsmill. When Thomas Palmer Abbott reached Australia he was 68 years

old."

 

BOUNTY IMMIGRANTS LIST TO NSW 1828-1842:

Thomas Abbott Age: 60 Occupation: Farmer BIRTHPLACE: Broadford. CO Clare Year: 1838 Ship:

Strathfieldsay Father: Abbott, Jonathan Mother: , Martha Both of Kings CO Comments: with family

 

 

Thomas and Eleanor had the following children:

 

+       221 M        i.  John Kingsmill ABBOTT  was born on 7 Sep 1805. He died on 10 Nov 1847.

           222 F         ii.  Lydia ABBOTT  was born on 9 May 1809 in Ireland. She died about 1823 in Ireland.

Lydia married Joseph SHAW 588 .

 

+       223 M       iii.  Joseph ABBOTT  was born on 1 Nov 1811. He died on 10 Aug 1841.

           224 M       iv.  William ABBOTT  was born about 1814 in Ireland. He died about 1814 in Ireland.

 

+       225 F         v.  Ann ABBOTT  was born on 17 Mar 1815.

 

+       226 F        vi.  Martha ABBOTT  was born on 3 Feb 1817.

           227 M      vii.  Jonathon ABBOTT  was born on 3 May 1820 in Ireland.

           228 M     viii.  Thomas Kingsmill ABBOTT  was born on 15 Feb 1825 in Ireland. He died on 2 Aug 1891 in Sydney, NSW, Australia. He was buried in 1891 in St Thomas's, North Sydney, Australia.

 

Thomas immigrated on 26 Jan 1838 to Strathfieldsay.

Thomas married Mary A CHALLENGER  about 1848 in Sydney, St Andrews, Bathurst Street, NSW, Australia.

           229 M       ix.  Henry Palmer ABBOTT  was born589,590  on 29 Jul 1827 in Ireland. He died591,592,593  about 1903 in Kogarah, NSW, Australia.

Henry married Elizabeth Ann LORD  daughter of Robert C LORD and Elizabeth WOOD about 1868 in Redfern, NSW, Australia. Elizabeth was born about 1844 in NSW, Australia. She died594  about 1926 in Woollahra, NSW, Australia.

 

+       230 M       x.  Benjamin ABBOTT  was born on 3 May 1829. He died on 15 Sep 1912.

           231 M       xi.  Robert Palmer ABBOTT  was born on 17 Oct 1832 in Broadford, Co. Clare, Ireland. He died on 31 Oct 1901 in Tempe, NSW, Australia. He was buried in 1901 in St Thomas's, North Sydney, Australia.

 

ABBOTT, ROBERT PALMER (1830-1901), solicitor and politician, was born at

Broadford, County Clare, Ireland, son of Thomas Abbott, policeman, and Eleanor, née

Kingsmill. In January 1838 he arrived in Sydney with his family as assisted immigrants.

He was the uncle of Joseph Palmer Abbott and cousin of Joseph Abbott. He attended

the Sydney College, was articled to Archibald Little and admitted a solicitor in 1854. In

1858-59 he had his own practice in Sydney and later was senior partner in various

firms until his death. In the late 1860s he lived for a time in Armidale where he opened

a branch office. He was a magistrate of the City of Sydney, and commissioner of the

Supreme Court of Queensland for taking affidavits in New South Wales.

 

When the 1861 Land Acts of John Robertson opened a new phase in land litigation,

Abbott specialized in these cases and gravitated to politics. In 1872 he won the seat of

Tenterfield supposedly as a follower of James Martin, whose government he at once

helped to overthrow on the border duties question. With reservations he supported the

ministry formed by Henry Parkes but voted against it in February 1874 in the Francis

Rossi case and in June in the first crisis over Frank Gardiner. Late in 1873 he had

been prominent in debates on the mining bill and in July 1874 accepted Parkes's offer

to become the first secretary of mines. Soon afterwards the Gardiner case exploded

again, resulting in a general election in December and the government's resignation in

January 1875. In November Abbott had been absent from the decisive vote. He did not

join any other ministry, but represented Tenterfield until 1877 and Hartley in 1880-82.

He sat in the Legislative Council in 1883-88 and in 1886 was a London commissioner

representing New South Wales at the Colonial and Indian Exhibition. He failed to

regain the Tenterfield seat in the 1891 elections.

 

Although not a major parliamentarian, Abbott was one of the majority who professed

independence but were prepared to offer their votes for office or favours for their

electorates. At the 1874 Tenterfield by-election which followed his appointment to the

 

ministry he told the voters, 'in all matters affecting the Parkes Ministry I have voted and

acted thoroughly independently, both for and against them'. Like most members of the

1870s he was a free trader and had more in common with Parkes than Robertson after

some initial confusion about 'Measures and men [appearing to him] to be so mixed up

… that it is somewhat difficult to distinguish between them'. He retained his admiration

for Parkes and in 1888 persuaded him to help Joseph Abbott to win a by-election at

Newtown. Abbott's only bill, introduced in 1875, went no farther than the notice paper.

He was a mild electoral and land reformer and sought an elective upper house; above

all he was a typical local member who consistently pressed for roads, bridges, schools

and railways, but left many letters unanswered. After a long illness he died, unmarried,

in a private hospital at Tempe on 31 October 1901 from a stroke. He was buried in the

Church of England cemetery at St Leonards, with a service conducted by his nephew,

Rev. T. K. Abbott.

 

***

 

 

   158. Joseph ABBOTT 501  (Eleanor ("snr") KINGSMILL, John*, Henry*, Henry*, Anthony*, Anthony*, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born502  after 1801.

 

Born after the death of his grandfather, John Kingsmill.

"John bequeathed, one eighth each, to "Eleanor Abbott and Sophia McClean my two daughters" and to "

Elenor Kingsmill and John Kingsmill my two grandchildren." These last two were the children of a son

John who had died early enough to escape his father's wrath and the usual shilling and a penny.  John,

like his brother Luke, was owed money by that Rev. "villain" and brother-in-law, John Kean, it was a bond

for £200.  So as the testator himself owed money to Samuel White of Roundwood Esq., and Marmaduke

Grace, late of Dublin, Attorney deceased, he left them to be paid out of John Kean's bond, the balance of

which he left in equal shares to daughter Sophia, and daughter Eleanor's two sons John and Thomas

Abbott."

 

Joseph married Jane KINGSMILL 495,496,497,498  daughter of Thomas snr KINGSMILL and Jane snr PALMER. Jane was born499,500  about 1794. She died about 1866.

 

They had the following children:

 

+       232 M        i.  Rev Thomas Kingsmill ABBOTT is printed as #205 on page 85.

 

   159. Thomas ABBOTT 595  (Eleanor ("snr") KINGSMILL, John*, Henry*, Henry*, Anthony*, Anthony*, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born after 1801.

 

Born before  the death of their grandfather in 1802, John Kingsmill, as noted in his will.

 

Eleanor Kingsmill (jnr):

 

John Kingsmill is described by his grand-daughter as follows:

"John married Eleanor Palmer only sister of Paul Palmer of Derreen.  They had five sons and two

daughters - Henry, Tom, Luke, Anthony and John, Sophia (and) the Rev. T.K. Abbott's grandmother."

John Kingsmill left and unusual will which contains much information.  He describes himself as Borris-in-

Ossory, Queens Co. 'very weak and feeble of body, but of perfect sound mind and memory, thanks to

God, and knowing that it is appointed for all mankind once to die." Then, less piously, he states that the

death of his brother Luke entitles him to certain rights and interests.  He leaves his three sons, Luke,

Thomas and Anthony, and his son Harry's son John, to recover these, and gives them each an eighth

share of the proceeds if any: if none, then one shilling and one penny each.  He gives his son Harry also

one shilling and one penny, and parts from all five "hereby totally cutting them off from receiving any

 

more of my "worldly substance."  John does not specify in his will the particular right or interest to which

he was entitled on the death of his brother Luke, who had already left him a shilling as a bar against any

demand.  The remainder of this irrecoverable right, John bequeathed, one eighth each, to "Eleanor

Abbott and Sophia McClean my two daughters" and to "Elenor Kingsmill and John Kingsmill my two

grandchildren." These last two were the children of a son John who had died early enough to escape his

father's wrath and the usual shilling and a penny.  John, like his brother Luke, was owed money by that

Rev. "villain" and brother-in-law, John Kean, it was a bond for £200.  So as the testator himself owed

money to Samuel White of Roundwood Esq., and Marmaduke Grace, late of Dublin, Attorney deceased,

he left them to be paid out of John Kean's bond, the balance of which he left in equal shares to daughter

Sophia, and daughter Eleanor's two sons John and Thomas Abbott.  Sophia was also left the remainder

of the lease of a house and garden rented from the reverend John.  A sum of £ 200 leviable on land and

Moniamore was distributed to daughter Eleanor Abbott (£ 22.15.0) and her two sons, John (£ 5) and

Thomas (£ 5) and her husband Thomas Abbott (£ 15) the remainder going to the grandchildren John and

Eleanor Kingsmill, already mentioned. These two grandchildren were left to the care of their Aunt Eleanor

(Abbott) and they could not "marry or cohabit with a papist 'or papists' under forfeiture of legacy.  The

executors were Samuel White of Roundwood and son-in-law Thomas Abbott; witnesses, Simon Miller,

Thomas Whitly and Low (?) Watters.

 

 

Thomas had the following children:

 

+       233 M        i.  poss John ABBOTT  was born about 1842. He died about 1911.

 

   160. Henry Kingsmill ABBOTT 596,597,598  (Eleanor ("snr") KINGSMILL, John*, Henry*, Henry*, Anthony*, Anthony*, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born599  about 1807 in Borris-in-Ossory, Co. Laois, Ireland. He died600,601,602  on 7 Dec 1842 in Parramatta, NSW, Australia.

 

Henry emigrated603  in 1839 from Cork, Ireland. He immigrated604  on 10 Jan 1840 to Sydney, NSW, Australia.

 

Born after the death of his grandfather, John Kingsmill "[1841] Father: Abbott, Thomas -Dead Mother: ,

Ellen Comments: with family"

 

INFORMATION FROM THE `WELCOME WALL`, SYDNEY: Henry Kingsmill ABBOTT sailed from Cork

on 1 August 1841 with his wife Martha Ann Lefruy and 7 children on board the "Duke of Roxburgh". The

ship arrived on 1o January 1842. He obtained work at Parramatta Gaol as a warden and was shot and

killed by an escaping prisoner on 7 December 1842

 

BOUNTY IMMIGRANTS TO NSW 1828-1842: Henry Kingsmill Abbott Age: 35 Occupation: farm servt

BIRTHPLACE: Borris in Ossory, Queens CO Year: 1839* (*?) Ship: DUKE OF ROXBURGH Father:

Abbott, Thomas -Dead Mother: , Ellen Comments: with family

 

Henry married Martha Ann LEFROY 605,606,607,608,609,610,611,612  daughter of Judge Hugh LEFROY and Martha about 1826 in Ireland. Martha was born613,614  about 1809 in Queens County, Ireland. She died615,616  on 16 Jul 1888 in Sydney, NSW, Australia.

 

Martha emigrated617  on 1 Aug 1841 from Cork, Ireland. She immigrated618  on 10 Jan 1842 to Sydney, Australia.

 

Family history provided by Brian Abbott:

 

The 10th January, 1992 marks the 150th Anniversary of the arrival in Australia of HENRY KINGSMILL

ABBOTT and his wife, MARTHA ANNE (nee Lefroy and referred to as Ann). They sailed from Cork,

Ireland on board the “Duke of Roxburgh” on the 1st August, 1841 on a voyage to Port Jackson which

lasted 163 days.

 

Henry is listed as being an agricultural labourer by occupation, Church of England by religion and able to

read and write. His age is stated as 35 but is shown as 40 when he died 11 months later. His character

references stated he had a good state of health and was “likely to be useful”! Ann is listed as a domestic

servant, Church of England and also able to read and write. Her age is shown as 32. She was the

daughter of Captain Anthony and Martha Lefroy of which nothing else is known

 

***

 

New South Wales, Australia 1828 - 1842: Bounty Immigrants List

about Anne Abbott

Name:                 Anne Abbott

Age:    32

Birthplace:          Athlone, Ireland

Year:   1839 (???1841)

Ship:   DUKE OF ROXBURGH

Father:                Lavarey, Hugh

Mother:              , Martha Dead

Comments:         with family

 

New South Wales, Australia, Assisted Immigrant Passenger Lists, 1828-1896

about Anne Abbott

Name:                 Anne Abbott

Estimated Birth Year:         abt 1810

Age:    32

Gender:               Female

Voyage Arrival Date:          10 Jan 1842

Vessel Name:      Duke Of Roxburgh

Origin Location: Athlone, Ireland

Children's Names:               Thomas, Hugh George, William, John, Henry, Ellen, Anne

 

 

Henry and Martha had the following children:

 

+       234 M        i.  Thomas ABBOTT  was born on 4 Apr 1826. He died on 21 Aug 1883.

 

+       235 M        ii.  Hugh George ABBOTT  was born on 15 Aug 1827. He died on 2 Oct 1858.

           236 F        iii.  Ellen ABBOTT 619  was born620  on 8 Aug 1830 in Ireland. She died621  about 1910 in Rockdale, NSW, Australia.

 

Ellen emigrated622  on 1 Aug 1841 from Cork, Ireland. She immigrated623  on 10 Jan 1842 to Sydney, Australia.

Ellen married Mr REA .

           237 M       iv.  William ABBOTT 624  was born625  on 7 Dec 1832 in Borris-in-Ossory, Queens Co., Ireland.

 

William emigrated626  on 1 Aug 1841 from Cork, Ireland. He immigrated627  on 10 Jan 1842 to Sydney, Australia.

           238 M       v.  John ABBOTT 628  was born629  on 23 May 1837 in Ireland. He died630  about 1909 in Sydney, NSW, Australia.

 

John emigrated631  on 1 Aug 1841 from Cork, Ireland. He immigrated632  on 10 Jan 1842 to Sydney, Australia.

John married Unknown .

 

 

Anne emigrated635  on 1 Aug 1841 from Cork, Ireland. She immigrated636  on 10 Jan 1842 to Sydney, Australia.

           240 M      vii.  Henry ABBOTT 637  was born638  on 7 Apr 1841 in Ireland.

 

Henry emigrated639  on 1 Aug 1841 from Cork, Ireland. He immigrated640  on 10 Jan 1842 to Sydney, Australia.

 

+       241 M     viii.  Joseph ABBOTT  was born on 1 Aug 1843. He died on 15 May 1903.

 

   161. K.G., 1st Marquess of BUCKINGHAM George NUGENT-TEMPLE-GRENVILLE  (George GRENVILLE, Richard GRENVILLE, Eleanor TEMPLE, Eleanor TYRELL, Eleanor KINGSMILL, William, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born in 1753. He died in 1813.

George married Mary Elizabeth NUGENT . Mary was born in 1758. She died in 1812.

 

They had the following children:

 

+       242 M        i.  K.G.,  2nd Marquess (& 1st Duke) of BUCKINGHAM Richard TEMPLE-NUGENT-BRYDGES-CHANDOS-GRENVILLE  was born in 1776. He died in 1839.

 

   162. Mary TUCKER 641,642,643  (Martin TUCKER, Dorothy SMYTH, Dorothy BURGH, Mary KINGSMILL, William, Francis, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born644  about 1778 in Carlisle, Cheshire, England. She was christened645  on 7 Sep 1778 in Blackawton, Devon, England. She died646  after 1844 in England.

Mary married650  The Very Reverend Robert HODGSON 647,648,649  son of Robert HODGSON and Mildred PORTEUS about 1804 in Carlisle, Cheshire, England. Robert was born651  about 1766 in Congleton, Chester, Cheshire, England. He died652  in 1844 in Congleton, Chester, Cheshire, England.

 

Robert was employed as Dean of Carlisle.

 

They had the following children:

 

+       243 F          i.  Henrietta Mildred HODGSON  was born about 1796. She died in 1891.

 

   163. Thomas FORTESCUE  (Chichester FORTESCUE, Thomas FORTESCUE, Chichester FORTESCUE, Sidney KINGSMILL, William, Francis, William*, John*, John*, Richard *, Richard*) was born on 1 May 1744 in Dromiskin, County Louth, Ireland. He died on 16 Jun 1778.

 

Thomas was employed as MP on 2 Jul 1768 in Trim, Louth, Ireland.

 

 Thomas FORTESCUE of Dromisken, MP for Trim was born on 1 May 1744 in Dromiskin, County Louth. 

He died on 16 Jun 1778. M.P. for Trim 2nd July 1768

 

He was married to Mary PAKENHAM (daughter of Lord Langford PAKENHAM) on 10 Mar 1770 in St

Thomas Church, Dublin. Mary PAKENHAM died in 1775.

 

Thomas married (1) Mary PAKENHAM  daughter of Lord Langford PAKENHAM on 10 Mar 1770 in St Thomas Church, Dublin. Mary died in 1775.

 

 

Thomas and Mary had the following children:

           244 M        i.  Chichester FORTESCUE  died (died as a child).

           245 F         ii.  Elizabeth FORTESCUE  died (died as a child).

           246 F        iii.  Anna Maria FORTESCUE .

 

Thomas married (2) Mary NICHOLSON  in 1766 in Dromiskin, County Louth, Ireland.

 

They had the following children:

           247 M       iv.  Lt Col Chichester FORTESCUE .

 

Chiches